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Need assistance with my sales presentation.

Hello, first of all my name is David Young. I am brand new to this forum and I would like to introduce myself. I am currently 20 years old, I've been in sales for over 4 years now, and I just recently got a new job with an advertising company. I've worked here for a week and a day, my first week I climbed from being absolutely nothing to a ranking of 13th place with about 35 sales reps on the floor. Now many people would find this acceptable however the top salesman as of right now made 5x more than me in that one week. I want to increase my sales to a point where I feel content.

The company I work for markets and advertises timeshares to companies and corporations that use them for annual conventions. My job is to call owners of timeshares and have them advertise with us.

Here is the script I've been using thus far and I have almost memorized it. However, as soon as I end the presentation and ask for the sale, I get the "Ehhhh, I need a little more time to think about it" and/or "I need to talk to my significant other before we continue". I would like help with the approach I'm using, any suggestions, criticisms, help is much appreciated.

Script-
Hello, may I speak with a Prospect. (if it is the Prospect ont he phone) Great my name is David Young, I am a portfolio manager at My Company. The reason I'm calling is because we're interested in your timeshare with the Resort that they own and I wanted to know if you would be interested in renting out or selling your property at a profit? (yes) Fantastic, I would love to help you out with that. I'll tell you what why don't you grab a pen and a piece of paper and we can find out together how much your property is worth. (O.K.)

(At this point I will get information from them regarding their property and give them a quote on the selling or rental price)

Now would this amount get you out of the market? (yes) Wonderful, now I'm going to tell you about our company. In essence what we do is market and advertise for the rental and sale of timeshares to companies and corporations that use them for annual conventions. The way it works is you maintain full control of your property. These companies and corporations will contact you directly with all their offers, you have the option to accept, decline, or negotiate offer. So for example one of these companies will call you and say "Mr/Mrs. Prospect, I want to buy/rent your timeshare for blank amount of money". What ever offer you accept is exactly what your receive. There are no commissions or broker fees at the point of rental or sale and once you have an offer that's acceptable to you, your job is done. Are you with me so far? (yes I'm with you)
Now the way we advertise is through classified ads with the USA Today. Last time I check they had over 5 million subscribers nationwide and 25 million internet viewers. We own and operate our own website which markets your property 24 hours a day 7 days a week globally. We hold over 35 conventions and trade shows every year. We advertise on cable television on such channels as TLC, A&E, Bravo, Lifetime, and the Travel Channel. We are a member of the BBB and have been for the past 7 years with no customer complaints as well as the American Resort Development Association. Now, I'd love to have your property listed within the next 24 to 48 hours so we can both make a profit. Does this make sense? (yes) Fantastic, let's get this deal done!

Now, we used to provide our services for free because that's how confident we are that we'll get your property sold/rented. But, what started happening was after we would list and market their property they would call us back once they started receiving offers and tell us out of the blue "You know what David, we want to keep our property as of right now". So we spent all that money to advertise their timeshare only to have it backfire on us and we ended up losing money for nothing. Does this make sense? (yes, that's terrible) So we do charge a one-time non-recurring marketing fee. However, we do provide a gift for you of equal more or less value as well as a money back guarantee. It is a vacation of your choice you can choose from anything between a cruise for two, a fly away destination for 2, or a resort of your choice. Everything is fully paid for meals, expenses, travel, everything. It is an open voucher, so if you don't have the time to take a vacation at this moment you can give it to a friend or family member, or even sell it for 100% profit to cover the upfront cost to market your property with us. Does that make sense? (yes) O.K. now which vacation were you more interested in the fly away destination for 2, the cruise for 2, or a resort of your choice?

(At this point most prospects will choose from the 3 mentioned above or they will say something along the lines of not being interested in a vacation or they start questioning how much the upfront cost is. If they tell me a vacation choice I will than list more benefits and locations of their particular choice and go to this....)

Now as I've said this vacation is absolutely free of charge and I can turn your property around within 30-50 days for the price of Quoted Price in the beginning of presentation, in your pocket within 30-50 days. This is the best part you have a choice between a Bronze, Silver or Gold package. The only difference between these packages is the amount of dedication and time we will put into turning your property around. The Bronze package is $699, the Silver is $899, and the Gold is $1299. Which package would you like to proceed with?

(End of presentation. After I ask which package to proceed with is when I start getting "Ehhh, I need to think this over" "I need to talk with the family first" "I need to talk to my significant other" "I have your phone number, I will give you a call")

How can I get the sale right than and there without having to deal with callbacks or "think it overs". I've told them every benefit, all the information, built up as much value in our service as humanly possible and I can't seem to close. Any guidance is very much appreciated. This has only been my first day using this script that I've created so maybe I'm thinking too much of it and just need to be persistant. However, I felt as though I should have closed these clients and I feel a little frustrated for not doing so. I am calling them back but, I'm not sure my presentation will be as strong the second time around. Any guidance/help is much appreciated. Thank you for your time.

Oh, and I'd like to add that throughout my presentation I keep a calm confident tone especially during the close and I answer any questions they may have throughout the conversation. The above example is just that, an example of a typical presentation.

Are you with me? - by Are You With Me
We all have had a customer that seemed to reject nearly everything that was presented Research on the customer's buying decisions has revealed that a customer's resistance may not be caused by what you present. It could be the sequence of your presentation.

Our research has shown 76% of sales presentations are out of sync with buying decisions. When making a major purchase decision, your customer goes through a process of five sequential decisions.

1. SALESPERSON. Customers decide if they like and can trust you.
2. COMPANY. What is your company's reputation? Is your company a good match for them?
3. PRODUCT. Is your product the right solution for their needs?
4. PRICE. Is your solution competitively priced? Is it a good value?
5. TIME TO BUY. Is now a good time for them to move forward with the purchase?

These decisions are always made in the same order. Only after the first two decisions are made will the customer seriously consider whether to buy your products.

This means that you need to sell yourself to the customer—by building rapport while conducting a good needs assessment—before you begin to sell your company and its capabilities. Not coincidentally, that needs assessment will also allow you to sell your company far more successfully. Why? Because you must first understand your customer’s needs, before you can answer the customer’s most important question about your company.
You must understand the customer’s needs before you can effectively sell your company.

In deciding whether to do business with you, customers have three basic questions about your company:

What does it do?
What is it known for?
Is your company a good match for mine?

The first two questions usually can be answered with a rehearsed sales presentation that explains what your company does and the benefits that other clients have gained from doing business with you.

The third question is most important, however, and you cannot answer it with a generic presentation that relies on standard information. To persuade customers that your company is a good match for theirs, you must tailor your answer to their specific needs.

The best way to do this is to tie your company presentation directly to needs that you uncovered earlier in the sales call. You thus are able to present your company’s capabilities as solutions to the customer’s key problems and opportunities.

For Example:

“You told me earlier that service from your current supplier is taking more than 24 hours and that this causes you problems meeting your production goals. We would be a good match for you because our service response averages less than four hours. With our company handling your service you will find it far easier to achieve your goals.”

“Are we a good match?” is every customer’s most important question about your company. You cannot answer it before you have uncovered, understood, and agreed upon the customer’s needs. “Sell yourself” first by demonstrating that you care about those needs. You’ll be amazed at how much more effectively you can then sell your company. - by SalesTraining2
Thanks for your response. I have a question in regards to what you've said. How do I go about "selling myself" to the customer (you stated that of course you build rapport, is there anything else I should be aware of?) and are there any basic questions that work for all areas of sales that I can ask to find the needs of my potential clients?

Also, I've noticed that in my script I basically ask for the big sale at the very end and force my prospect into making a buying decision, however what I've seen work better is to closing the prospect throughout the presentation instead of asking for a big sale at the end. How do I go about closing my prospects throughout the conversation instead of making them jump through a hoop once I ask them for the sale at the end? - by Are You With Me
Most salespeople devote the majority of their selling time to "pitching" their products or services. Here's the problem: Whether prospects realize it or not, the first thing they decide is whether they like and trust you. If you bury your prospect beneath a mountain of product features while they are making the salesperson decision, you're probably in deep trouble.

If prospects make the salesperson decision while you're droning on about product features, their answer will be "No!" When prospects like and trust you, everything else about the sales process becomes much easier. So how can you sell yourself better? Here are a few ideas:

Demonstrate your interest. Quit trying so hard to be interesting. Be interested instead. Ask open-ended questions to learn about the prospect. Don't talk too much about yourself.

Show that you understand. People have a strong need to feel understood. Ask open-ended questions, listen and make sure you understand your prospect's needs. Restate the prospect's needs so they know you understand. But merely asking questions isn't enough. You need to ask "The Best Questions." For example, asking questions that draw out your customer's needs that your product's strengths can fill. This will position you as the best or only solution for the customer's needs.

As you ask open-ended questions to investigate a customer's needs, you will come upon some needs that seem to have a particular urgency. Whenever you suspect this is the case, ask a leverage question to confirm your hunch and clarify the situation. Examples of leverage questions: "How has this problem affected you or your company?" "What are the consequences if the problem continues?" "How are others affected?" "What opportunities does this situation represent for you or your company?" Good leverage questions identify what's at stake for the buyer, but the very best ones aim at discovering the customer's personal hot buttons or gut issues. Here's a gut issue: "How will I be better off if I bring this solution? Will I look like a genius? Will I get a promotion? A bonus? Some recognition I crave?"

By clarifying what's really at stake with a business problem or opportunity, leverage questions increase the customer's desire for a solution. And they let the salesperson know how to present a product as the right solution to the right issues.

Use an organized procedure for sales calls. Something like the Action Selling Process. This step-by-step procedure will keep you on track and help you appear methodical, thorough and professional. Your professional approach will sell you.

Prospects 'buy' the salesperson during every sales call - or they don't. The other buying decisions the prospect makes are far more likely to go in your favor when you are effective at selling yourself.

Hope this helps. - by SalesTraining2
Here's another hint:

Salespeople are commonly told to sell “solutions” and “value” rather than just product features. But when the time comes to present their products, they fall back on generic scripts with no direct connection to any specific needs the customer has revealed. The customer winds up in a one-sided conversation, listening to the salesperson present too many low-priority capabilities.

What salespeople lack is a structure for presenting products in a way that ties features and benefits directly to the customer’s expressed needs. Lack of structure in a sales presentation is a prescription for lack of perceived value.

There is such a structure—Action Selling’s TFBR method (for Tie-Back, Feature, Benefit, Reaction). It lets you create sales presentations that communicate a compelling reason to move forward by connecting product features to actual needs the customer has already agreed upon. In other words, TFBR provides the answer to, “How do I sell solutions?”

Solution: To present your product as a solution, tie a specific need the customer has expressed to a feature of your product. Tie Back by restating the need, then describe the corresponding Feature.

Value: Demonstrate the feature’s value to the customer by explaining its Benefit, again in terms of the customer’s expressed need.

Confirm: Cement together the solution and value by asking for the customer’s Reaction. This tells you if what you have presented is, indeed, perceived as a valuable solution.

Here is an example:

Tie Back: “You said you were dissatisfied with the unnatural light of your fiber-optic unit.”

Feature: “Our Model 2000 uses a color-correcting system that delivers perfectly white light.”

Benefit: “This improves the visual sharpness and reduces eye strain and fatigue."

Reaction: “How would a sharper image help with your work?”

When you structure your presentation using the TFBR format for each product feature you discuss, you have a self-correcting method to ensure that what you are presenting is a valuable solution that hits all the right targets.

Of course you would need to structure this with your own product. Take some time and re-outline/re-structure your presentation.

Hope this helps - by SalesTraining2

Here is an example:

Tie Back: “You said you were dissatisfied with the unnatural light of your fiber-optic unit.”

Feature: “Our Model 2000 uses a color-correcting system that delivers perfectly white light.”

Benefit: “This improves the visual sharpness and reduces eye strain and fatigue."

Reaction: “How would a sharper image help with your work?”

When you structure your presentation using the TFBR format for each product feature you discuss, you have a self-correcting method to ensure that what you are presenting is a valuable solution that hits all the right targets.

Of course you would need to structure this with your own product. Take some time and re-outline/re-structure your presentation. Hope this helps
I'm not arguing with you here, I like Action Selling, but TFBR by itself is not the complete format as it may, of being structured. Action Selling is though. Why I like Action Selling, and how it's helped me, is that though I consider it hokey.... it is a process that is simple to follow. THAT'S FOR ME! Yup.... I learned a lot from Action Selling.... although I'm sure most of the rest of the processes would disdain it for it's simplicity.

The idea of questioning, for example is discussed here at length. There are all sorts of tag's applied to questions, where action selling calls suggests that you ask the "best" questions. Maybe that is simplistic (REPRESENTS ME) but when a process says, "go to a meeting with a plan to get commitment" Go to a meeting with specific questions in mind that will bring out needs that might represent solutions that I offer and offer a template for this. Simple (God Bless Simple People.... and the rest too... but..).

The TFBR is tied to the questioning. Specific Questioning that uncover needs and then agreement on needs uncovered that your products satisfy.... TFBR takes a feature that solves a need... that's the benefit. Do several of these, and ask... any questions.. ? Would you like to move forward with this then? You hope for a "how much" but if you get a stall, then you're back to TFBR with another feature... or back to questioning.... process, process, process.... and a hokey storybook ending.... this is for me... however... something simple... something I'm trying to present for my kids. - by rattus58
Lets make it easy for you. You know who the top sales consultants are. We can give you a general idea on what you can do different, and listen to what most people say here. But try this. Hang out with this top sales person who has 5x the sales you do. Mimic him and do what he does. Do this and guess what will happen... - by jrboyd
Here are your first three sentences:

Sentence 1: My name is David Young;
Sentence 2: I am a portfolio manager at My Company.
Sentence 3: The reason I'm calling is because we're interested in your timeshare with the Resort that they own and I wanted to know if you would be interested in renting out or selling your property at a profit? [/quote]

The main problem I see with this is that you're trying to close the sale in the third sentence of your call. How many times have you agreed to buy something after the third sentence when someone cold calls you?

Probably never.

So don't try to close a deal up front. Try to get permission to have a conversation. Sentences one and two are fine. Try this for sentence 3:

"The reason I'm calling is that we might possibly be interested in your timeshare with XYZ Resorts. If we're interested, we would rent out or sell your property providing you with a profit. Would you possibly like to spend a couple minutes exploring this idea with me on the phone?"

If the prospect says "yes", now you have a prospect who's most likely actively involved in the process (engaged!).

I think the phrase "might possibly" is a killer sales phrase. It helps take the edge off of many sales situations. Never use it for closing, of course, but use it often for opening up conversations.

I hope that is helpful to you.

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Oh, wow thank you Skip, it makes so much sense. It's amazing how a couple changes can make part of a presentation so much more powerful. I had much more success with this opening today. This is actually kind of frustrating, I see now how inexperienced I am compared real professionals.

I'm reading Advanced Selling Strategies by Brian Tracy right now, are there any materials, books, courses I can take to improve my sales performance and knowledge? - by Are You With Me
Oh, wow thank you Skip, it makes so much sense. It's amazing how a couple changes can make part of a presentation so much more powerful. I had much more success with this opening today. This is actually kind of frustrating, I see now how inexperienced I am compared real professionals.

I'm reading Advanced Selling Strategies by Brian Tracy right now, are there any materials, books, courses I can take to improve my sales performance and knowledge?
You're welcome.

Don't get frustrated! You're doing the right thing by identifying your opportunities for improvement and then pursuing avenues that will allow you to achieve a new level of success. Bravo to you!

I highly recommend Brian Tracy's work, so you're starting at a good place. There's a lot of good stuff out there, and certainly, a lot of good stuff here at SalesPractice. Also trainers that participate here have good information. Keep searching and learning.

You'll find several threads here at SP with books that SP participants have recommended, too.

All the best,

Skip - by Skip Anderson
It's NOT about you or what you are selling - it's always about them.

"Little i - BIG U"

Go back and count the times you used "I" or "we" in you sales call or presentation. I'm sure it will be telling...

As a buyer, do I really care about you or your company? I think NOT. Tell me how your service will HELP me solve a problem I am experiencing (or soon will experience) and I will be more apt to listen...

Selling is now moving into a third stage. The first stage of selling was PRODUCT. My broom (or buggy whip) is great!” or “Here is your phone; I hope you like black…” The second stage, the rage today, is solution selling. Figure out what problems the prospect is having and solve them with your solution. Notice the move away from product to the solution because PRODUCTS DON’T SELL.

In the 2nd "solution selling" stage, the problems your products solve is what sells. Look at it this way… It is not if they want to use your advertising service to sell their timeshare; it’s what are the IMPACTS the client is suffering because the own a timeshare. If all the impacts are positive - they will keep it forever; however, if you can surmise the negative impacts they are suffering (not using, costs, too far away, too old or infirm to travel, etc.) from owning a timeshare – they will listen to what you have to say because you may have a SOLUTION to their problems. I earned a lot of commissions using solution selling techniques and so can you!

The third stage of selling is moving towards – “TEACH ME!” Executives don’t have time to teach YOU about their problems, but they do want to be taught what you know that may help them today or with a problem that is coming. Early warnings are always appreciated! You don’t get prepared to climb Mount Everest when you are at the base of the mountain. Teach people something and selling gets a whole lot easier!

Make learning a life long quest - if you take off the "L" in the word LEARN; what you have left is the word's value proposition!

Good luck!

Rollie
Helping you help others… - by rolliemerrick
Hi Are you with me.

I agree with Skip bravo to you that you have taken the time to ask questions..and more importantly listen and implement the answers.

Build the relationships first this must always be your number one priority that way you are likely to have a customer for life rather than one sale.

Remember as well there is tons of evidence out there that suggests prospects need anywhere between 5-7 interactions with you before they are "warm" and buying can take place.

Another great question by the way is to ask What is important to them about x y or z. This will get to the core of peoples true motivations.

Something else you could also do is sit down with a sheet of paper and write out what you know about your prospects and what you think might be important to them .
What is it they want in their life?

What are their fears?

What are the conversations going on in their head?

Then you can think through what difference having this information will do for you in your approach.

You seem to have a great attitude and that is everything in sales.

Also you are having a go and testing things out which is excellent a lot of folks can't be bothered.

Remember when you were first riding a bike you fell of a few times no doubt?? ..and you got back on and mastered it.

Take this attitude with you and you will find it will have the same effect in your work life.

Best Wishes

Managers Coachthmbp2; - by ManagersCoach
I don't know a thing about phone sales, but these are the reasons I would hang up the phone before you finish your pitch.

Do people really cough up $1300 over the phone without building more trust and providing more information, proof that your company is legitimate, etc.

I think you use too many words. You can remove the words stating your company owns, operates, and run the company's web site 7 days a week. Everyone already knows how web sites work. Talk about how many hits your site gets and how many people have sold or their time shares through the site. You can talk about how many time shares are rented, sold, and how fast they move through your newspaper ads. Tell how long the company has been in business, how many employees, where you are located, etc.

Why do you say you are a portfolio manager? I get about three sleazy calls every day from portfolio managers selling stock. I immediately hang up the phone. Most people are aware of phony titles and I like someone to be honest and tell me they are a sales rep from XYZ company.

I don't like the offering of three different packages. You should be representing my best interest all the time and then you complicate and confuse me by asking me to make several choices. First, I have to decide if I want to do business with you at all and then I have to decide from three different services. The offering of different services makes me thing you are only fishing for an amount I am willing to part with without further investigation.

I would ask you how much of my money is going to be used to advertise my time share, how much of my money is used to purchase the vacation that I am paying for anyway, and is my vacation just a booklet of coupons that require me to make other purchases, and do you have proof that the proper amounts will be applied to each. Maybe you could sell your customer by answering these questions before they start an answer and question battle. - by pcplumber
Thanks for your response. I have a question in regards to what you've said. How do I go about "selling myself" to the customer (you stated that of course you build rapport, is there anything else I should be aware of?) and are there any basic questions that work for all areas of sales that I can ask to find the needs of my potential clients?

Also, I've noticed that in my script I basically ask for the big sale at the very end and force my prospect into making a buying decision, however what I've seen work better is to closing the prospect throughout the presentation instead of asking for a big sale at the end. How do I go about closing my prospects throughout the conversation instead of making them jump through a hoop once I ask them for the sale at the end?
Hello Are You With Me

I agree with this. Ask closing questions all through your presentation. I personally would be offended if I was forced to listen to all of your presentation and then find out it was more than I could afford or you were going to ask for a fee. In my opinion I think you should start preparing your prospect for the close all the way through the presentation. By doing this there is no sticker shock at the end. It will also save you alot of time and call backs. I need to look at your presentation again; then I will give you my suggestions.

Martha - by MPrince
Hello Are You With Me...take a look at this and see if this might help.


Hello, Timshare Prospect, my name is David Young, I am a portfolio manager at My Company. The reason I'm calling is to let you know we rent/sale timeshare with your Resort and I would like to give you a chance to be involved if this is something you would be interested in. Have you thought about renting or selling your property at a profit? (Slow down and let the client talk and listen) if this is something you are interested in I would love to help you out with that. Is this a good time to talk about money? If so we can determine what your property is worth and exactly how much it will cost you. (this is the time to start talking to him about your fee nothing else is important until he knows that).

Remember to slow down and listen to what the owner is saying. Let them talk. This is how you build repoire with the prospect.

Understand there is nothing wrong with a husband or a wife asking you for the time to talk to their spouse over such a large decision. so there are always going to be times when you will have call backs.


Hope this helps.

Warmest Regards - by MPrince


Hello, Timshare Prospect, my name is David Young, I am a portfolio manager at My Company. The reason I'm calling is to let you know we rent/sale timeshare with your Resort and I would like to give you a chance to be involved if this is something you would be interested in. Have you thought about renting or selling your property at a profit? (Slow down and let the client talk and listen) if this is something you are interested in I would love to help you out with that. Is this a good time to talk about money? If so we can determine what your property is worth and exactly how much it will cost you. (this is the time to start talking to him about your fee nothing else is important until he knows that).
With all due respect, I have a problem with this strategy.

"Have you thought about renting or selling your property at a profit?"

My opinion: This is a closed question. Closed questions are poor at promoting conversation. And, does it matter if the prospect has thought about this? No. So why would one ask this? What if the prospect said "no?" Where do you go from there? Then the salesperson has to recover from a negative response. What is important is that the prospect is going to think about it right now while the salesperson is talking to him/her.

"What do you think about this concept" or something similar would be a much better question, imo. This is open-ended which means the prospect is free to contribute whatever is on their mind at that time.

The primary goal on a call like this is to engage the prospect. Once they're engaged, and the salesperson can judge their interest, the salesperson can proceed to qualify the prospect and move the sales process forward.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Skip...what is wrong with a no at this point? That is a great time to hear a no because that opens the door for you to begin the sales dialog. That is the time to begin to tell why he "should" be thinking of renting or selling. It is not, no I am not going to buy from you it is, no I haven't thought of it yet.

Skip I must admit you are the pro when it comes to B2C and this is simply my opinion; but I believe sales people are way to afraid of hearing "NO". In my opinion no's are often a way to get to a YES!

Martha - by MPrince
Skip...what is wrong with a no at this point? That is a great time to hear a no because that opens the door for you to begin the sales dialog. That is the time to begin to tell why he "should" be thinking of renting or selling. It is not, no I am not going to buy from you it is, no I haven't thought of it yet.

Skip I must admit you are the pro when it comes to B2C and this is simply my opinion; but I believe sales people are way to afraid of hearing "NO". In my opinion no's are often a way to get to a YES!

Martha
I am on a mission to delete wasted words from sales dialog. "Have you ever considered blah blah blah blah" as an opening in a sales conversation is wasted words. The answer doesn't matter whether it's yes or no; if the answer doesn't matter, the question doesn't matter.

If salespeople would just learn the art of asking good questions, they'd find they'd get good information in return. But so many salespeople are just looking for an opportunity to PITCH, not an opportunity to UNDERSTAND. Our real opportunity to serve our prospects (and engage them) is in the UNDERSTANDING part of the equation not the PITCHING part of the equation, in my opinion. - by Skip Anderson
I am on a mission to delete wasted words from sales dialog. "Have you ever considered blah blah blah blah" as an opening in a sales conversation is wasted words. The answer doesn't matter whether it's yes or no; if the answer doesn't matter, the question doesn't matter.

If salespeople would just learn the art of asking good questions, they'd find they'd get good information in return. But so many salespeople are just looking for an opportunity to PITCH, not an opportunity to UNDERSTAND. Our real opportunity to serve our prospects (and engage them) is in the UNDERSTANDING part of the equation not the PITCHING part of the equation, in my opinion.
Skip...somehow I don't believe a customer saying, "no I haven't thought of that" will retard your mission at all. - by MPrince
I'm kinda on the same wave here... how does "have you considered" detract from the sale. Have you considered Disability Insurance as an alternative to paying for time off from work from your savings?

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Sales is a hurt them and rescue them proposition. Where is the pain in "have you considered?"

Skip is correct in asking questions as long as one is searching for the pain or the impact the prospect, their family or company is experiencing because of the pain.

No Pain - No Change

"I have been working with timeshare owners for the past 4 years and found they are totally frustrated making payment for a beautiful vacation spot they never use. I have helped owners like you solve this problem and would like an opportunity to tell you how..."

The pain is shelling out cash for something they are not using and the rescue is the service being sold. If you hit on a pain the prospect is experiencing, the response typically is: "I have that same problem" or "tell me more." As Skip says, you can then use "good questions" to discover how bad they are suffering, the impact and what is their vision of a solution.

This discovery must all be done before your "product" comes out of your pocket because if you don't fully understand the pain; how can you ever prove the value of your product or service? If they have a $5k pain and the cost of your service is $10k; will they ever buy?

Pain is always the most important factor in a sale. "Good questions" qualify the opportunity in the prospects mind and helps you decide if the prospect is worth pursuing.

"Have you considered..." is a fishing expedition; conversely, nailing them with a pain you know they probably have (learned from talking to hundreds or other prospects) gets directly to the point. If they don't bite on the first pain, have a couple others to try. If none of your pain probing works; they don't have a problem you helped others solve. Disengage because you're wasting valuable prospecting time; however, ask for referrals and keep them "on-the-line" with something like:

"Thank you for this opportunity, you don't have any of the problems I/we have helped our clients solve; however, in the future these issues may come up... If you don't mind, every once in a while, I will send you an article or insider information on timeshares. I promise NOT to spam you but knowing what is happening in the timeshare marketplace could be very valuable information to you as time passes. My I have your e-mail address?"

Make the next call, search for pain, ask good questions and prosper!

Rollie
Helping you help others...
- by rolliemerrick
Thank you for your input Rollie...it is always good to hear from someone that works in the industry to get a clear understanding of what the prospect may be feeling. So what you are saying is that in your opinion it is okay to ask, "have you thought about" or "have you considered" when you are in that situation? Is that what I am reading from your post?

Warmest Regards - by MPrince
If you have time for "fishing" asking "have you thought about" or "have you considered" may work because it does start a discussion. Does a salesperson have that much time when prospecting? My experience is 20 seconds on the first call...

Credibility is critical when prospecting and one gains credibility by the inch and loses it by the mile. Since the salesperson has spoken to (hopefully) hundreds of prospects they know what pains their prospects are experiencing and if their product or service solves them.

Make them feel the pain that others have experienced by owning a timeshare. I am not in the timeshare business, but, in my opinion there are only a few "bleeding neck wounds" that would make it urgent enough for the prospect to act NOW.

I can live with a pimple on my cheek by rolling over to the other cheek (or put make-up on it depending on the cheek we are talking about - LOL) but I cannot live with a bleeding neck wound. If the pain isn't great enough for immediate action - "no decision" or "let me think about it" will be the ultimate winner. If the prospects pain is a bleeding neck wound, they will pay for a "care flight to the hospital" to get it fixed!

Concentrate on the pain and expand it to others in the family (or company) because pain is felt by everybody. Example, that $4k/year they are spending on a timeshare could be used to buy a better education for their child or a hearing aid for Mom to improve her quality of life or Grand Pa could get a GPS monitor so when he walks away he could be tracked...

The faster pain is "discovered" (the salesperson should know what pains their products solve) the better chance of a sale. Until the pain is quantified, a salesperson shouldn't talk about a product because PRODUCTS DON'T SELL. Hurt them with the IMPACTS felt of NOT having the product and selling gets easier. That's the impact of a pimple compared to a neck wound. Find the bleeding neck wounds and then PROVE with your product that you can solve the problem and they will quickly sign the contract.

No pain - No change!

Rollie
Helping you help others... - by rolliemerrick
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