Home > Education > A good salesperson can sell anything to anybody.

A good salesperson can sell anything to anybody.

True or False - A good salesperson can sell anything to anybody. - by Thomas
I think only if Need or Value are realized by the prospect, then the skills of the presenter could sway a non-buyer into a desired prospect, but if they are convinced that neither exists for them, then they are not a candidate.

Ed - by Ed The Roofer
In my opinion, a good sales person must, not only establish need and value, but must also believe in their product or service to be able to sell it. - by MPrince
In my opinion, a good sales person must, not only establish need and value, but must also believe in their product or service to be able to sell it.
Au Contrairre Madaam.....

I do not Need to believe that a particular product that I am selling is the best for the customer.

There is a significant range of clientelle that does not demand the best service or best product is what they need to fulfill their desires.

Maybe my perspective is tainted, but as an example, a home owner calls me up and needs to put on a new roof so that his/her home can be sold on the open market for a decent going rate, rather than being discounted due to a major flaw in first impressional perception and value.

I am not even going to attemot to sell an extremely high end roofing product to that particular prospect, based on past experiences, although I will not preclude the possibility that they could for some reason or other, still choose the higher end value.

Therfor, I will still have my best product options available for them to see and choose, but will only test tread water carefully in regards to that upsell, so as not to infect that prospect with the perception that I would be too pushy for something that he/she has no intent or desire to purchase.

That customers value level is that "Good Enough, Is Good Enough", in most cases, although I have run into the exception, which is why the upper end offer still is listed and at least casually discussed, but most of the time just thrown off the table immediately.

The good thing about that throw-off, is that the medium and lower versions now look even more appealing and represent a significant deal that they now can afford.

Ed - by Ed The Roofer
Ice cubes to eskimoes.... sawdust to a woodshop... reading glasses to a blind man... is that politically incorrect?... Oh well they probably won't read it anyways.... Beltone sold me a hearing aid... and if you all aint had/have on of them things... we're talking bout $8,000 ... to a deaf man.... stcktng; What's that say about me.... I need protection.. More rules maybe... we're unregulated too much I think..

But can a good salesperson sell anything to anybody the answer on it's face is obviously no. Can a good salesperson ultimately develop a strong trust relationship with anyone is likely a more relevant question. To this my answer would be that if a salesman/woman practices...

honesty
empathy
enthusiasm
and vision

that the answer probably's closer to more likely than not.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
To this my answer would be that if a salesman/woman practices...

honesty
empathy
enthusiasm
and vision

that the answer probably's closer to more likely than not.

Aloha... :cool:
I agree. And--I would add that a good salesperson would spend much more time thinking about, and practicing, those things. - by Ace Coldiron
False False False False False

Somewhere along the line this became a definition of what successful selling is all about, but it's misdirected and incorrect. It's unrealistic to say that a great salesperson sell anything to anyone imo. - by Skip Anderson
There is a book called, "How to Sell Anything to Anybody" that was written by Joe Girard who is named in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The world's greatest salesman". What does he know that you don't? - by Houston
Just because the client is buying a cheaper product does that mean the roof is going to leak or you will not give the best service possible? Would you sell them a product that was tainted or faulty? - by MPrince
There is a book called, "How to Sell Anything to Anybody" that was written by Joe Girard who is named in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The world's greatest salesman". What does he know that you don't?
I've read his books. How comfortable are you with his closing techniques.. especially the "urgency" closes which is where I actually remember closing the book on Joe Girard.

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
I believe that a truly great salesperson can sell anybody for one reason. EVERYONE buys. Question is who do they buy from. So is it possible? yes. Is it probable? No. - by jrboyd
There is a book called, "How to Sell Anything to Anybody" that was written by Joe Girard who is named in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The world's greatest salesman". What does he know that you don't?
I've never read the book and probably won't because I am much to busy selling...but I can tell you this...I do not want to sell a product to someone if it is not what is best for them. I want to keep that client for a long time. If I force a sale the client will recognize that eventually and I have lost that business. The client and I decide together what is best for them. In my opinion the difference here is "selling to the client" or "allowing the client to buy". - by MPrince
There is a book called, "How to Sell Anything to Anybody" that was written by Joe Girard who is named in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The world's greatest salesman". What does he know that you don't?
Just because it's the title of a book doesn't mean it's true, nor does it mean it should define what salespeople should do or be expected to do!

Perhaps my next book project should be titled "Close Every Customer in 10 Minutes Or Less." Then I raise Mr. Girard's bar! - by Skip Anderson
There is a book called, "How to Sell Anything to Anybody" that was written by Joe Girard who is named in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The world's greatest salesman". What does he know that you don't?
I think he knows how to call himself the world's greatest salesman while keeping a straight face. - by Ace Coldiron
False False False False False

Somewhere along the line this became a definition of what successful selling is all about, but it's misdirected and incorrect. It's unrealistic to say that a great salesperson sell anything to anyone imo.

I completely disagree with you on this.

I have worked in door-to-door sales for about 15 years, selling just about any product or service you can think of. Everything from cable, Triple A memberships, gas/electric deregulation to window cleaning and roofs.

I have seen sales reps, who have jumped into various industry's with me, selling all of these services and products and exceled in it.

Therefore I am living proof to tell you, not only have i sold anything to anyone, but have had teams I have built that have done so too.

Check my sig, if you do not belive me.

Thanks - by Jumpman
Look at companies like AFLAC, Bankers Life, Foresters, World Financial Group, All State, Farmers, etc., etc., etc., who prey on people who have lost their jobs with teasers such as:

"You never have to worry about being passed up for a promotion. Your growth is based on your hard work and determination, with promotions given based on the work that you do. Your only competition is your will to win and your desire to make it happen."

or

"Unlimited income potential (associate managers earn $60K to $100K; top managers earn upwards of $200K)
• Competitive commissions and compensation package
• Opportunity to earn quarterly bonuses and exciting sales incentive trips
• Formal training in our nationally-recognized program
• Access to our lead generation and sales technology programs
• Freedom to be your own boss, but with the support of large corporation"


WOW, where do I sign up?

It looks like good companies can sell anything to anybody!

Unfortunately, these desperate jobless people take sales jobs outside their ken. They do sell some insurance policies or financial instruments to their friends and families but quickly discover that selling is more than following a “proven method of success” and they change “careers” again…

It’s interesting that colleges don’t have a degree curriculum in selling? The best sellers take lessons from many fields taught in colleges including psychology, philosophy, anthropology, operations research, mathematics and business to name a few. Sellers must be well rounded because they will encounter many people, businesses and situations where some familiarity will help their efforts.

I have found autodidactic people are sponges and learn from their successes, mistakes and everyone around them. EVERYTHING is a learning experience in selling; by not doing so limits your selling growth (and commissions)!

Thankfully, some people know they could never sell anything, while others test the selling waters and soon realize they can't sell anything to anybody. The salesperson that continually learns new skills will succeed.

There are many “old dogs” in this group that have learned new tricks; furthermore, it seems, from their insightful posts, that they have the best selling skills.

Enough said…


Rollie
Helping you help others…


BTW – Take off the “L” from the word “Learn” and the word’s value proposition remains, consequently, make learning a lifelong endeavor! - by rolliemerrick
It’s interesting that colleges don’t have a degree curriculum in selling? The best sellers take lessons from many fields taught in colleges including psychology, philosophy, anthropology, operations research, mathematics and business to name a few. Sellers must be well rounded because they will encounter many people, businesses and situations where some familiarity will help their efforts.

I have found autodidactic people are sponges and learn from their successes, mistakes and everyone around them. EVERYTHING is a learning experience in selling; by not doing so limits your selling growth (and commissions)!
I love what you have written in those two paragraphs, Rollie.

I have applied to selling, and my growth in that field, things that I have learned from many seemingly unrelated experiences and studies. Everything from psychology, four wall handball, chess, great mystery fiction, sailing (Isn't tacking and jibing a form of Psychocybernetics), martial arts, biographies, Sun Tzu, Myamoto Musashi, etc.

We learn from life itself, and the key is to live it, love it, and be grateful for it. - by Ace Coldiron
True or False - A good salesperson can sell anything to anybody.

But should they? A good salesman will not sell things that will not do what the customer wants it to do. - by rich34232
A good doctor can help anyone. A good minister can encourage anyone. A good teacher can teach anyone. A good salesperson CAN sell to anyone.

O.K., I’m messin’ with words here. I just like being the contrarian once in a while. Plus, this is a great topic. I’m a consultative selling guy, and this question stresses the importance of product knowledge and understanding of customer needs over so-called ‘gift-of-gab’-type selling skills.

I would probably get my butt kicked out the door if I tried selling a fleet of 787 aircraft to a foreign airline, in part because I have no expertise in that field. The customer would detect my lack of product knowledge (and probably a little klutziness) in no time. BUT……give me someone who possesses the right skills, plus hunger and drive to succeed and, yes, they could sell (eventually) anything. - by Joe Guertin
In my opinion a good sales person will not sell anything to anybody! - by MPrince
In my opinion a good sales person will not sell anything to anybody!
I agree.

Furthermore, top sales producers require that their prospects and customers determine what they want and what the value of your products or services are to them. - by JacquesWerth
A good sales person will not sell just anything they will provide the opportunity for a client to purchase a product that they believe in. They may have the skills to sell anything to anyone. However there needs to be a want or a need, an ability to complete the transaction (ie money) and a will that the potential client wants to deal with the individual.

Remember: People still buy,trade, exchange with people they like and trust. - by Jeff2155
False False False False False

Somewhere along the line this became a definition of what successful selling is all about, but it's misdirected and incorrect. It's unrealistic to say that a great salesperson sell anything to anyone.
Bang on mate!

A professional would not try to sell someone something they do not really need. And though this happens, it is not proof of anything except that there are people in our profession - and it is a profession - that are unscrupulous!

Selling is an Art. It is the art of helping someone buy that which they need/want/desire. It ceases to be an ART when the techniques of selling are employed to the benefit of the sales person only and not the buyer too.

In fact, you should have a third bottom-line outside off benefiting you the REP (profit) and the customer (people) and that is what is good for old Mother earth (the planet).

Triple bottom-line = People, Planet. Profit. If it ain';t good for them then you should not bee making a profit. And if you are a professional then you can sell any service or product that is good for the client (people) and the planet ... so why sell something that destroys the planet?

Look, if you can put the prospective client first and sell that which is good for the PLANET you can then make a profit and feel good about yourself and what you do for a living. If this does not fit what you are doing today work your way out of it and find something better for the PLANET - if you don't care what you sell to the client as long as you make money then you are not a professional at all.

Sure, my skills allow me to sell anything but my heart and head stop me from trying. Don't be unethical in any way, there is no need to.

Last comment; no matter how good you are eventually someone will not like you. Therefore it is FALSE to state that "a good salesperson can sell anything to anybody"! - by EnormousEnergy
Bang on mate!


Sure, my skills allow me to sell anything but my heart and head stop me from trying. Don't be unethical in any way, there is no need to.

Last comment; no matter how good you are eventually someone will not like you. Therefore it is FALSE to state that "a good salesperson can sell anything to anybody"!

I completely agree! Just because I can doesn't mean I should! - by MPrince
I believe that although people may have good sales ability, you still need to have industry training and knowledge. I signed up for my CNPR Certification (Certified National Pharmaceutical Representatitve) through the NAPRx (National Association of Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives) and I can already see why the companies look for specific training. - by bobbyflakes12
The selling environment and sales rep's personality type plays a role in determining the answer to the question as well.I remember some time ago early in my sales career when i was cold calling selling beverages to convenience stores and supermarkets (ugh) we had a fellow rep who was lights out. He opened up more accounts by himself than the entire sales dept combined. He had a savy personality that was very likeable and trusting. He was loud and boisterous but fun to be around. Needless to say he had some personal family problems that caused him to leave his position after a few short years.

Sometime later i was working in another sales industry for another company doing B2B sales conducting relationship type consulting sales when he was hired there.He simply could not adapt to that type of sales process.He lacked patience and commitment to follow through.

So i dont believe all salesman/reps can sell anything to anybody.A lot of factors go into the equation. - by libbycop
Au Contrairre Madaam.....

I do not Need to believe that a particular product that I am selling is the best for the customer.

There is a significant range of clientelle that does not demand the best service or best product is what they need to fulfill their desires.

Maybe my perspective is tainted, but as an example, a home owner calls me up and needs to put on a new roof so that his/her home can be sold on the open market for a decent going rate, rather than being discounted due to a major flaw in first impressional perception and value.

I am not even going to attemot to sell an extremely high end roofing product to that particular prospect, based on past experiences, although I will not preclude the possibility that they could for some reason or other, still choose the higher end value.

Therfor, I will still have my best product options available for them to see and choose, but will only test tread water carefully in regards to that upsell, so as not to infect that prospect with the perception that I would be too pushy for something that he/she has no intent or desire to purchase.

That customers value level is that "Good Enough, Is Good Enough", in most cases, although I have run into the exception, which is why the upper end offer still is listed and at least casually discussed, but most of the time just thrown off the table immediately.

The good thing about that throw-off, is that the medium and lower versions now look even more appealing and represent a significant deal that they now can afford.

Ed
I believe you're confusing "best quality" for "best solution."

As a roofer, or, advertising executive like MPrince, the job is to LISTEN and determine what the prospect wants to achieve and offer a product consistent with that desired outcome. - by Gary A Boye
IMHO......nope. If you believe so you're setting yourself up for a lot of disappointment...percentages change depending on what you're selling... the likelihood that you will walk away with a sale is increased the more you believe in the product and how it will benefit the prospect, not how it will benefit you, and how you help the prospect make that informed decision...a 'no' is merely a prospect asking for more information....give them enough to decide and it's okay not to sell everyone...as long as you know you did your best to overcome objections and answer their questions... - by hudsonvalley
..a 'no' is merely a prospect asking for more information....
That's an often parroted platitude that has been around sales lore for years, similar to another that says an objection is merely a prospect asking for more information.

Neither is correct. It is true however that a possible cause for both a "no" or an objection can be a result of the salesperson not covering information that should have been covered. If you start thinking that the prospect has the responsibility to correct your failure to cover things, you'll fail to correct your own flaws. - by Gary A Boye
We have tracked hundreds of the best sales producers in 23 industries. They are all in the top 1 percent.

That group closes an average of 74 percent of their sales opportunities. The highest we know of close 92 percent - and there are very few of them.

We believe that the average closing rates of salespeople in most industries is around 15 percent. However, we don't have accurate statistics on that. - by JacquesWerth
That's an often parroted platitude that has been around sales lore for years, similar to another that says an objection is merely a prospect asking for more information.

Neither is correct. It is true however that a possible cause for both a "no" or an objection can be a result of the salesperson not covering information that should have been covered. If you start thinking that the prospect has the responsibility to correct your failure to cover things, you'll fail to correct your own flaws.
Should not have said 'merely'...there are people that don't want what your selling...there are also those that truly can't afford it....working on a one night close, I assume the sale many times throughout my closing sequence...guess I misspoke....I have to sure...that's why I have 'no' as my more info button....appreciate the input - by hudsonvalley
Should not have said 'merely'...there are people that don't want what your selling...there are also those that truly can't afford it....working on a one night close, I assume the sale many times throughout my closing sequence...guess I misspoke....I have to sure...that's why I have 'no' as my more info button....appreciate the input
I have always been amazed that salespeople can seldom determine what they are doing that consistently works and what they are doing that seldom works. Therefore, they continuously do things that seldom work. And, they spend most of their time and resources trying to sell to prospects that will not buy.

To most prospects, "Assuming the Sale" is insulting and usually Rhetorical. It seldom works.

If you ask all your prospects whether they will spend within a certain money range, before you make an appointment, you won't waste your time on those who will not.

If you ask a prospect whether they want your product or service, and they say "No," don't give them an appointment. Spend that time finding prospects that say "Yes."

"Interested" prospects seldom buy. - by JacquesWerth
I have always been amazed that salespeople can seldom determine what they are doing that consistently works and what they are doing that seldom works. Therefore, they continuously do things that seldom work. And, they spend most of their time and resources trying to sell to prospects that will not buy.

To most prospects, "Assuming the Sale" is insulting and usually Rhetorical. It seldom works.

If you ask all your prospects whether they will spend within a certain money range, before you make an appointment, you won't waste your time on those who will not.

If you ask a prospect whether they want your product or service, and they say "No," don't give them an appointment. Spend that time finding prospects that say "Yes."

"Interested" prospects seldom buy.
Excellent points.

Rather than having high-powered sales meetings focused on theories and trading unique anecdotes that will impact no one, why not do something unusual--ask your clients and your customers what motivated them to buy from YOU.

Create a survey demanded by the "powers that be" and have your current customers and clients fill them out or respond to your questions in person.

Make up 5-10 questions that you would like answered so you can repeat what works and avoid what doesn't. If you would like a very personal question answered, bury it in 20 questions so it does not look obvious. Do this periodically and a pattern will occur. (Most often the first survey is an eyeopener)

By designing a model that gave me a general overall guide to my selling my prospects, the rest is rather irrelevant to sustain sales success.

Continue to learn of course but now you know to be highly selective. - by John Voris
For (almost) Instant Sales Improvement -

Keep statistics on all of your sales activities and the time it takes to do each one. After a few weeks you will know what is working for you and what is not.

Do more of what is working and eliminate what is not. - by JacquesWerth
There is a book called, "How to Sell Anything to Anybody" that was written by Joe Girard who is named in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The world's greatest salesman". What does he know that you don't?
He probably knows how to finagle those rocket scientists at the Guinness Book of World Records into making him "the world's greatest salesman."

Either he caught 'em napping or he sold them a Chevy. - by Gary A Boye
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.