Home > Resistance > How would you respond to, 'If it's meant to be'?

How would you respond to, 'If it's meant to be'?

I showed a home last night to a guy who wanted to think it over and said, "If it's meant to be". He came back today and the home had sold. How would you respond to, 'If it's meant to be'? - by Thomas
So what your saying is this is not your dream house, am I right?

If the answer is yes, there is no buying motivation and you need to ask some more questions to find out what the buyer is really looking for.

If the answer is anything that indicates it is the dream house, then tell a story about someone you know that put off making a decision and was devastated when they found out another offer was made and accepted. - by jdedwa11
"Mr. Customer, in my past experiences, I have found that consumers are leary of making big decisions such as this, and would rather leave it up to fate or chance. People are always afraid of making a bad decision that they may regret later on. The most important part of my job is to ensure that whatever (product) you pursue for purchase is the (product) that you do like. Now, this product has ________, __________, and ________ that you had expressed to be important to you, right? And it does seem to be the approximate price range you were looking at for investing, right? Well since this (product) seems to be what you are looking for, and is in the investment range you were looking at, my I make a suggestion based on my past experiences in sales? Instead of depending on the hope system or fate or chance, why don't we go ahead and proceed to the next step? I've seen many customers decide to wait and see, only to have the (product) sold to someone else. Since this does seem to fit your buying criteria, lets go ahead and continue with the process, and at anytime if you feel that this isn't the (product) for you, by all means we can withdraw our offer. I'm not here to make you this one sell today, I'm here to take care of you and ensure that you are satisfied, that way the next time you, your family or your friends, are intrested in purchasing a (product) I will be the first one you think off. So let's go ahead and get this started, and I like I said, if you feel this isn't the (product) for you at anytime during the negotiations we can withdraw the offer. Sound resonable to you?" - by jrboyd
How would you respond to, 'If it's meant to be'?
Sounds like an excuse..........

Trial closing may have cleaned it up, perhaps braking the pact........... - by PiJiL
This person is probably one of the same people who thought "The Secret" was about sitting on your couch visualizing all day.

Well, I've got news for him, you have to take action or they'll take your furniture away.

I agree this is nothing more than an objection and you have to get to the bottom of the objection. - by Jim Klein
"If it's meant to be.." is almost always used to diffuse a perceived attempt by the salesperson to get the sale "now". It is quite often reflective of a prospect's discomfort or annoyance with the saleperson's attempt.

Although it often follows the delaying "Think it over..", it's not the same, and every attempt should be made to put the prospect at ease. This is NOT a time for rebuttal, or another closing attempt.

"Pressure" is one thing. "Perceived pressure" can lose a saleable sale. - by Ace Coldiron
I showed a home last night to a guy who wanted to think it over and said, "If it's meant to be". He came back today and the home had sold. How would you respond to, 'If it's meant to be'?
By the time you have gotten to this point, you should know HOW LONG has he been looking and how many homes he has actually looked at and how much frustration he is feeling because so many have not met his criteria to be in the 'dream home' category and HOW urgent it is for him to find a home, at this time. Keep in mind that if he hasn't been looking for a long time or been disappointed with his lack of success in finding a home, or under little stress to move, this may not work. But then you may not have a very motivated buyer either.

How about "Mr. Jones, when I have met with people who have been looking for awhile like yourself and been unsuccessful in finding the right home, yet need to be out of their current living situation and they come upon the RIGHT house, if they don't put in a bid on it and instead take the chance of waiting even one day, it often isn't available when they call me up the next day. Is that really the chance you want to take." - by Paulette Halpern
By the time you have gotten to this point, you should know HOW LONG has he been looking and how many homes he has actually looked at and how much frustration he is feeling because so many have not met his criteria to be in the 'dream home' category and HOW urgent it is for him to find a home, at this time. Keep in mind that if he hasn't been looking for a long time or been disappointed with his lack of success in finding a home, or under little stress to move, this may not work. But then you may not have a very motivated buyer either.
What should a salesperson do when the prospect is just now starting to look and you are the first person the prospect has talked to and these are the first homes the prospect has looked at? - by Thomas
What should a salesperson do when the prospect is just now starting to look and you are the first person the prospect has talked to and these are the first homes the prospect has looked at?
WHY is he looking? Must he move? Is he seeing all of his friends move into bigger homes by taking advantage of the housing market, is he just trying to do the same; or does he have to find a different house for a specific reason -- what problems will he have if he DOESN'T find a new home? Ask him what he does for a living and make a comparison to his world and how does he feel when people 'spend his time', but don't end up following through on a 'project decision'. Ask him 'what process will he go through to DECIDE on the homes he sees?

Maybe you just have a looker, not a buyer; "Mr. Buyer, I love to show people homes to enhance their life, but by what date do you see yourself in your new home? I will be very committed to you, but will you be loyal to me as YOUR personal real estate agent"

Just some thoughts for questions before you run out the door, and run around town. - by Paulette Halpern
What should a salesperson do when the prospect is just now starting to look and you are the first person the prospect has talked to and these are the first homes the prospect has looked at?
Half (or more) of the prospects who say they're just now starting to look and you're the first person the prospect has talked to are lying. Chances are they've looked and they've talked to other people.

How do I know this? From hearing that hundreds of times from customers, but then creating rapport and trust, doing an excellent job of needs investigation, and then asking them later what else they've looked at that they kind of like or kind of don't like.

So the important part here is to realize that they may not be telling the truth, and to proceed with a well-conceived and effective selling strategy.

Questions to ask:
What made you want to start looking at homes today?
Even though you haven't looked at anything yet, what do you have in mind?
If I could make the perfect home for you, what three features would be important to you?
How will you know when you've found the "right home?"
etc. - by Skip Anderson
The real goal should be to prevent this statement in the first place. How does one do that? Build incredible sales momentum using a selling process that leverages your sales skills.

Having said that, here are a couple tactics:

1. "I know what you mean, Bob, I've heard customers say that many times over the years, so thanks for sharing that thought with me. What I've learned is that when people tell me that, they're really telling me one of two things: (1) this isn't the right house for them, or (2) they'll having trouble with the price. In your case, which one is it?"

2. "Oh, Bob, quit kidding around (always said with a smile). You told me you love this home and it was the perfect size and it had everything you were looking for. So let's take fate out of the equation and make a decision today. Bob, is there something you didn't tell me about how you feel about this home, or is it the money?"

Best,

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Build incredible sales momentum using a selling process that leverages your sales skills.
What does that look like? - by Thomas
I have a much different take on this then the majority have indicated. My take what was the client in search of? Why were they not shown homes that interested them?Why take a client to a home that was not part of their dream home perception?

If the client wanted a 3 bath home with 4 bedrooms and a large kitchen with 2 acreas of land and in an rural setting,showing them a home less then this is a waste of their time and yours. The loss of trust and value in the sales persons judgement.

My take not enough homework done prior to the actual house shopping. Having a visual image of what they are in search of allows you to answer the question if it is meant to be.

Ask questions about each detail they wanted and find out why they object. Perhaps the street was to busy for kids? to many kids in the neighborhood. - by rich34232
I think that right off, I'd have to ask what "If it's meant to be" really mean.

I learned in writing class that a story had to have who, what, when, and where, and whatelse in order to be accurate. Professional sales is no less complex.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
I think that right off, I'd have to ask what "If it's meant to be" really mean.

I learned in writing class that a story had to have who, what, when, and where, and whatelse in order to be accurate. Professional sales is no less complex.

Aloha... :cool:
Oh so true. It isn't easy communicating when you're talking apples and oranges. - by Thomas
...

2. "Oh, Bob, quit kidding around (always said with a smile). You told me you love this home and it was the perfect size and it had everything you were looking for. So let's take fate out of the equation and make a decision today. Bob, is there something you didn't tell me about how you feel about this home, or is it the money?"...
Great answers and I'd like to add to some ideas to this great script.

Sometimes a buyer (deceptively) tries to control the the negotiation through the agent using this tactic. We recently closed an apartment building with a client like this. He lied a lot and lost a lot of credibility and sometimes this is SOP for high powered execs in this fast paced Silicon Valley.

Skip's script IMHO is one excellent choice for this situation as was a few takeaway closes that we used to put this specific one to bed in the end. - by Tony_B
Are you looking for a sign? How will you know if this is meant to be? - by Houston
Curious about something on this topic, and my curiosity is triggered by my own previous post, and what Skip had to say also.

In your own respective selling histories, approximately how many times have you had someone say to you "If it's meant to be..."?

It seems to me that answers on this thread would becoming from different references of experience, namely: Those that have heard it alot, those who have heard it once or twice, and those who have never heard it,--in selling situations. - by Ace Coldiron
In your own respective selling histories, approximately how many times have you had someone say to you "If it's meant to be..."?
I have been in sales over 25 years, and been a sales trainer many of those, both internally in a corporation and as a Sandler Trainer, I haven't heard it once, that I can remember. I don't remember one of my clients even using that as a problem for them to overcome. - by Paulette Halpern
The closest i have had is the God excuse

'We need to pray about it overnight' - by PiJiL
The closest i have had is the God excuse

'We need to pray about it overnight'
I have had that happen once, but they also asked for references which was a welcome sign. I got the contract the next day.

You said "closest". Do you believe it has the same or similar intent as when a prospect would say "If it's meant to be"? - by Ace Coldiron
I suppose so............... - by PiJiL
I suppose so...............
I don't. I may not have ever gotten the sale if the prospect said "If it's meant to be.." But then again people don't say that to me because I don't do things that would invite that "back off" hint.

But I have witnessed it where I observed another salesperson, and I cringed.

About six weeks ago, I closed a fairly large sale to a Baptist church. Praying was a very real and open part of their buying process. I was tuned in to how they went about things and "God excuse" never crossed my mind.

I think there is a major difference between "terms" and "excuse" or for that matter, ways to politely say "back off." - by Ace Coldiron
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