Home > Personal Development > Are some people just not cut out for sales?

Are some people just not cut out for sales?

We often here about the "born salesperson" whether you believe in it or not. What about its polar opposite? Are some people just not right for selling?

I'll start. Although I am not entirely convinced of the idea of "born salesperson", I do believe that some people have very slim chances of ever being successful in sales, and would be better off pursuing other lines of work.

I have my own thoughts on what they inherently lack, but let's hear other opinions. - by Ace Coldiron
Some people are born athlete's, and have a natural talent for such, so why is it hard to believe that some people are born salespeople. I do believe that some people are naturally more comfortable with dealing with people. Now as far as being successful, it depends in your definition of success. If you are talking about a sales superstar than it would be very hard without natural born talent. If your talking about above average then I believe that anyone can achieve that. It just will take alot more work than some one more adapt to dealing with the public. - by jrboyd
Ace Coldiron
Some people have natural behaviour and ambition that lends itself to sales, others don't have the correct behaviours but as long as they have the drive and ambition can acquire them. - by marky
Ace Coldiron
Some people have natural behaviour and ambition that lends itself to sales, others don't have the correct behaviours but as long as they have the drive and ambition can acquire them.
Just to keep the ball rolling on this--then would you say that if they lack drive and/or ambition, it would be safe to say they are NOT cut out for sales? - by Ace Coldiron
Just to keep the ball rolling on this--then would you say that if they lack drive and/or ambition, it would be safe to say they are NOT cut out for sales?
So your asking if a lazy person is cut for sales? Then answer is no. - by jrboyd
So your asking if a lazy person is cut for sales? Then answer is no.
Yes, certainly lazy people would not seem to be cut out for sales. But, JR..its almost too easy to stop there. What about other possible reasons? - by Ace Coldiron
I've started my sales doing door to door, and made it to management where I was running my own regional office. I found that I can show anyone how to be proficient in sales if they had 2 simple charactaristics.
1) Student Mentality
2) Ambition/Hardwork
If you give me anyone with those two traits, they can be trained to sale. Will they be a superstar? Probably not, but the will be average to above average. Because if you look at sales, everything else about the sales, is something you can teach. - by jrboyd
I've started my sales doing door to door, and made it to management where I was running my own regional office. I found that I can show anyone how to be proficient in sales if they had 2 simple charactaristics.
1) Student Mentality
2) Ambition/Hardwork
If you give me anyone with those two traits, they can be trained to sale. Will they be a superstar? Probably not, but the will be average to above average. Because if you look at sales, everything else about the sales, is something you can teach.
Is average worth it though, JR? Maybe straying from the topic, but the question almost belongs here. - by Ace Coldiron
So your asking if a lazy person is cut for sales? Then answer is no.
I am one of the laziest people you will ever meet, that is the reason why I love selling, it is perfectly matched for fat, over weight, lazy people like me.

A bit of humor - seriously, I do qualify as one who would like to get through life the easy way. That was my Dad's pitch when I went to work instead of University ... it appears to have been the thought process that spawned Robert Kiyosaki's book "If you want your kids to be rich and happy, don't send them to school?" (please note and recognize the need to a question mark not an exclamation mark in that book title)

Since, through sales, I can make much more money than the great majority of my friends who are not in our industry, having done so without going to University - not needing a degree (everyone needs a degree at SCREW U - the school of hard knocks), I believe it is the lazy man's approach to wealth. And I thought my personal point of view, though controversial, might help this thread.

It is not that I directly appose jrboyd ... it is that I was not voted most likely to succeed in school (not even close), but look where I am now (and how little I need to do today to be wealthy)!

When I have time I will add to this thread. There is a psychological reason why people are not suited to sales that ties into core values - beleive it or not, who their parents and friends are/were has to do with IF they should get into sales.


I am not just a student of sales, I am, without doubt, a contrarian (in more ways than one). - by Gold Calling
Is average worth it though, JR? Maybe straying from the topic, but the question almost belongs here.
That's up for the person to decide for themselves. Honestly I don't do sales because of the money. Sounds bad, but to me I see each customer as a challenge or a game. I love challenges and I love talking to people, so that's the main reason I do it. If you don't like sales, and you are only wanting an average paycheck, then sales probably isn't the job choice for you. Why would you work the hours we do in sales, just to get minimum wage? - by jrboyd
That's up for the person to decide for themselves. Honestly I don't do sales because of the money. Sounds bad, but to me I see each customer as a challenge or a game. I love challenges and I love talking to people, so that's the main reason I do it. If you don't like sales, and you are only wanting an average paycheck, then sales probably isn't the job choice for you. Why would you work the hours we do in sales, just to get minimum wage?
You're using yourself as an example. Having read your posts with a discerning eye, I don't believe you are an example of average ( a relative term). You know your specific area of sales and you know it well. SO--would YOU settle for less? I doubt it. - by Ace Coldiron
I'll post my view but I'm hesitant to post my underlying reasons for my view completely.

I believe that some people are NOT cut out for sales. I believe that there are three areas of thinking that will permanantly obstruct their chances of being successful in sales. They are three areas that are never discussed here on this forum and I'm not inclined to bring them up now, because they would provide no defining moment for anybody deficient in those areas of thinking. - by Ace Coldiron
Whoops!

Somebody just gave me a negative reputation ding on that last post--I wonder who.

I hate to think it that anybody here is using the reputation feature on the forum to post a comment that belongs here on the thread.

In any event I choose to not elaborate on my above post--as I stated--perhaps much to the reputation dinger's chagrin. - by Ace Coldiron
You're using yourself as an example. Having read your posts with a discerning eye, I don't believe you are an example of average ( a relative term). You know your specific area of sales and you know it well. SO--would YOU settle for less? I doubt it.
Settle for less? I not sure on that honestly. I'm fortunate enough to love my job, and key thing with this business is if you do truly love it then you make money. Can't say the money isn't helpful, but I also wouldn't say it's my primary motivation. Give me a puzzle or an equation and I won't rest till I solve it. The real question is do I love my job because of the money or I make money because I love my job? And I can't answer it because I've always had both so... not sure 0,o - by jrboyd
Settle for less? I not sure on that honestly. I'm fortunate enough to love my job, and key thing with this business is if you do truly love it then you make money. Can't say the money isn't helpful, but I also wouldn't say it's my primary motivation. Give me a puzzle or an equation and I won't rest till I solve it. The real question is do I love my job because of the money or I make money because I love my job? And I can't answer it because I've always had both so... not sure 0,o
Less is a relative term too, JR. I don't know you but from your posts I admire you.

"Less"? Years ago I shocked people in my trade by turning down a job offer that would have taken me to the very top of my industry--God willing. People thought I was crazy--maybe I was. I pursued a different path, entirely bent on sales and my own entreprenuerial spirit. Less? More? Who knows. I have no regrets. - by Ace Coldiron
WOW, for the first time on this site, I agree with SOME of what AC said bgwnk;

Inherently lazy would describe me.

A few years ago, my mindset was altered from my fathers

'you need to work hard to make money'

to

'money comes easily and regularily'

These days, I physically spend 16-25 hours per week at work and make double what my co-workers make in 40-60 hours.

It took several years to perfect and several of my staff have asked me 'how' I do it. One has asked me to show him.

I would class him as the 'only' bloke I work with who is cut out for sales. - by PiJiL
These days, I physically spend 16-25 hours per week at work and make double what my co-workers make in 40-60 hours.
Par for the course for the simple reason that success in selling rarely exists without inordinacy. If you were to say you are successful, I would expect that you could produce ratios or comparisons like that. My nephew accounts for 65 percent of all the written business in his office of twelve salespeople. My own best example was 57 percent of all the annual business among an entire sales force of twenty three people--two years running. That was back a few years before I launched my own businesses. We can brag but so what--it's what success in selling looks like.

But whether you're bragging--or I am--it's off topic. Back to "Are some people just not cut out for sales?" So far an embryo of consensus that some people are not. - by Ace Coldiron
Hmmmm interesting questions and more interesting about the born natural athlete. Let us look at the naturally born athlete. They may run the fastest, they may have the physical build to withstand the natural beating however it is the nurturing that allows the athlete to become the very best they can become.
Let us look at Michael Jordan who did not make his high school basketball team. We would consider him to be the ultimate athlete today. In some circles they may even claim that he was the best to ever play the game.
Without the proper nurturing, and coaching I might not be using him as an example in this thread. There is a saying that Dean Smith was the only person to hold Jordan below thirty points a game. Dean Smith taught him that it takes a team to have a winning attitude it takes a team to be successful as a unit.
It does not matter if you have natural born talents or learned talents it is the environment that makes the person and their ideals. What takes control next is that person desire and drive to become the very best they want to become. We are stopped by ourselves not our competition. We stop ourselves by accepting our limitations. - by rich34232
This is actually a question I've asked often lately. My job transitioned to commission only about a month ago, and the sales aren't happening. I have felt for some time that I need to re-examine if I should continue in this venture. I received a base salary during the initial couple of months of my tenure--"training period". Another question I've had is do I need to feel obligated to the employer b/c of this time period when I was paid, or do I just have an honest conversation with my supervisor, ensure I leave them with all of my documentation/records, and move on? Thanks for your input! - by rgrider
I believe that if you don't have the stick-toit-iveness, the drive to be in sales, you're not going to be happy. If you are under pressure to earn a living... you may not make it either because you get distracted. If you don't believe in your product, you won't make it.

On the other hand, if you drive yourself with a belief system and enthusiasm with an objective of succeeding in this endeavor, you will in fact succeed. It's been said that you need to commit for 21 days in order to change your behavior, and I've found this to be entirely accurate, and probably because if you decide to do it, you'll do it even after one day, but 21 gives you a habit of succeeding that is difficult to overcome.

Aloha... Tom shds; - by rattus58
... do I just have an honest conversation with my supervisor, ensure I leave them with all of my documentation/records, and move on? Thanks for your input!
What you are not is an indentured slave, you can quit at any time without obligation but should you?

The truth is that no one here can advise you. We do not know how well you were trained, what basics you have on sales skills, what mastery to date you have achieved or anything about you personally.

It would be ludicrous for any here to try. I can only suggest a phone conversation with a coach to see if you are well suited.

On the other hand, if you drive yourself with a belief system and enthusiasm with an objective of succeeding in this endeavor, you will in fact succeed. It's been said that you need to commit for 21 days in order to change your behavior, and I've found this to be entirely accurate ....
We all know what you mean Tom but, though good advice in general, I don't believe it is applicable to the question posed by this thread, which - if you will humor me - I will attempt to explain another point of view, at least to some degree.

Can you learn sales in 21 days?

Maybe a better question is; can everyone change their ingrained mental habits in just 21 days? I would suggest that in three weeks or a month, a person could in fact make it on the road to recovery if suffering from "stinking thinking" or any number of things that people go through psychologically but also in many cases not be able to turn around a mental situation that precludes them from being in sales, if they suffered from such. To me, it just isn't that simple.

Clearly, deep emotional scars from being raped or anything extreme may preclude such a poor unfortunate person from being capable of carrying on normally in a business that requires a high degree of personal interaction. While they might make an excellent and poignant writer they may not be suited to selling now or maybe even ever.

But that is an extreme example. I do not think we need to go to such lengths like traumatic experiences or mental illness to prove that even the best self help guru material in the world would not prepare everyone to succeed in sales - not in the short term anyway.

Never mind that a person cannot master even the rudiments of selling in that time, not that this is a prerequisite to being "cut out for sales". There are reasons inherent in personality and core values that should interfere with the choice of selling as a profession.

When we talk of personality and a person's values, if anyone could be said at any given point in their life to have a "crap-py one" ... they would likely take years to correct that enough to be able to "be liked" the majority of the time in sophisticated and even unsophisticated selling situations.

In 21 days you could adopt habits that result in the needed change but this could take a long time, even though you adopted a general "positive mental attitude". But even this is not a sufficient example of what I am trying to convey (I realize that!).

What point is effective in translating the considerations or reasons why a person is or is NOT cut out for what we do?

The gurus of self help do tell us that this habit reforming, to have a "positive mental attitude", is possible in this period. In many individuals cases, I don't disagree. But THAT DOES NOT MEANT THAT EVERYONE CAN BE GOOD IN SALES or even that everyone can accomplish this turn around.

The reason why is simple; this rule does not apply to everyone. If it takes a life time to; (A) develop a crap-py personality, or; (B) to develop a dislike for selling and sales people - do you really believe that in 3 weeks this ideology or lack there of can be turned around enough to succeed in our profession?

If the answer is yes I would argue that selling is easier than perceived to be and that means that top pay in the form of commissions would not be available, as we could be paid more like WAL-MART employees ... instead of having the potential of earning a half a million or more a year!

If you took a lifetime of bad thinking and wanted to change it, depending on how much damage you caused yourself, you might take 5 years to accomplish that.

Take a close look a rehab. At three months these people are released and have to go on serious outreach programs to maintain. Why? Because it takes longer than three weeks to accomplish effective change.

It take a couple of years to master sales that's IF you have a good coach and/or good training information and if you are willing to pay the price, studying in your spare time as well as attending sales meetings and taking a leading role. And, no, typing in a forum does not help you master sales, only role playing works in terms of practice.

Great sales people pay a huge price to become great.

In truth, those who become nice people take years to do so too, finishing that job with loving care.

While I would not belittle RAT's post, I just do not think we can use the self help guru dogma - designed for effect to reach those who can be helped - as an argument to say everyone can do this. In my opinion, it takes more than attitude and intelligence plus stick-with-it-ness or perseverance to win in our game. - by Gold Calling
I'm not believing it being belittling....

I was not referring to his learning sales. I'm not sure I was saying that at all, actually, more of one changing ones behavior. Personally I have a hard time selling something I'm not enthused about, but I have changed my attitude.

I'm not sure, but I think it was Mark Victor Hansen said you can change your behavior in 21 days. If you can "believe you can achieve" I think was also his... but that is irrelevant... what I was getting at, is that if you do things for 21 days, the experts say and I have myself kicked smoking, drinking, and weight, proven to myself that this works. As I ALSO SAID, if you want to do something and set your mind to it, you'll probably do it in a day, its just that 21 days helps you develop a habit of succeeding.

I'm not sure I mentioned sales in this at all Gold, and it seemed to me that this gentleman is wrestling with even staying in the business. Teach him all you want, personally, if he's not motivated, I feel that one would have a hard time sticking to it without wanting to. - by rattus58
Your attitude affects your altitude :-) - by PiJiL
Your attitude affects your altitude :-)
I'm sittin in yer co-pilots seat on this flight... yup.... thmbp2; - by rattus58
I'm not sure I mentioned sales in this at all Gold, and it seemed to me that this gentleman is wrestling with even staying in the business. Teach him all you want, personally, if he's not motivated, I feel that one would have a hard time sticking to it without wanting to.
Hansen is certainly right to "sell" change (if we can reach just one person, it was worth it), if I was in that business I would do the same as him and many others (Rohn is my favorite). Attitudes can be adjusted but not everyone's can in that time frame. In context with the thread's topic, I felt that I needed to take minor exception.

My use of your post in this thread was not directed at you but other readers (you too of course). Again, I stand by the fact that not everyone can succeed in sales, not without paying the price. This applies to entrepreneurship too.

And the price you might have to pay, depending on who you are today, could be far greater than three weeks or even three months. - by Gold Calling
And the price you might have to pay, depending on who you are today, could be far greater than three weeks or even three months.
Interesting thought GC..................

Could you elaborate please? ;sm - by PiJiL

My use of your post in this thread was not directed at you but other readers (you too of course). ;st Again, I stand by the fact that not everyone can succeed in sales, not without paying the price. This applies to entrepreneurship too.
Succeeding at sales has a lot of pieces and I've witnessed many who have failed, despite my best efforts...;bg Kidding, I'm not in training except for my own kids, and it is difficult to get the message right sometimes.

My personal belief is that you have to keep it simple. You have to keep the message focused. You have have enthusiasm, which comes from a belief system of success.

Personally, that would be IN MY OPINION.... an opinion of one, without credential, my perceptions of success are it doesn't matter the skill if you don't have the motivation. On the other hand, I am witness that one can sell without skill....sn;

My only gripe, Gold, is that you right too long. Break things down into smaller pieces... more bitesized. This is MY gripe... not the rest here, because I can't concentrate that long...

Aloha.... Tom shds; - by rattus58
Your attitude affects your altitude :-)
Yes, to soar with the eagles you need to ditch the circle jerk with the turkeys.

You can lead a horse to water... you can't make him drink but you can make him thirsty. Having a good mentor or manager to train them correctly is key.

Even though I may not have approved of underachievers lackluster performances I would not say that they we're not cut out for sales.

There are many styles of selling and I have found that when the less flexible types are shown, or figure out how to accommodate their style, they start to realize some success. How much success however, is dependant on many other factors.

Given a long enough time line and in a good economy where it's harder to find qualified candidates, even an under performer can outlast a high maintenance inconsistent High Flyer.

So to stict to the topic; yes and no, depending on the time line and available talent. :) - by Tony_B
I held back on posting my complete thoughts on a topic I started, but obviously I have shed my "hold back" pattern. I'll give my thoughts, and I'm not looking for agreement on this. But I WILL say that they come from many, many years of observing the selling scene and the people in it--and observing myself as objectively as I could. Also--reading most of the posts by most of the people on this forum has been a study that reinforces my beliefs.

I want to take training or education out of the picture, and address the raw material.

Some people, for whatever reasons, lack the ability to RECOGNIZE the real meanings of common speech or language patterns. They would be hard pressed to have any success in selling, simply because they would not be able to filter the information coming from a selling conversation, and in turn respond in a way that would bring success.

There have been examples of that here in discussions which explore correct responses to prospects' statements. That, by the way, is one of the reasons that it is difficult for a truly advanced person to connect with some others in an attempt to help them. There is a language barrier AND a meaning barrier.

Second, and I know this will draw opinions to the contrary, intermediacy is a MYTH in selling. The term is usually used to point to time on the job--not to effectiveness. Intermediacy is not the road to mastery. The road to mastery is a quantum leap directly from novice. AND--by "novice" I point to those who would call themselves intermediate as well. They are in fact daily making many more mistakes than "novice-beginners", because time on the job exposes them to more opportunities to make the same mistakes--over and over again.

To those that think that's ugly news, it's not. You can take the quantum leap TODAY. Just think of yourself differently. And DROP the word, Intermediate. If you take solace in that counterfeit label, you are not cut out for sales.

Lastly, people who dwell in the middle ground between "yes" and "no" and take false comfort in "maybe" are not cut out for sales. Selling is taught in a linear way, but it is too often mistaken for a linear process when sometimes it is not. Great salespeople do not create YES--they SEE it where others don't. - by Ace Coldiron
Some people are not cut out for sales. I agree. To disagree would be equal to expressing that everyone can play baseball. The sad truth everyone can play baseball. Only a few can become exceptional .There are far more that are fair at the game, even a greater number that are good. A trainer can take a good ballplayer and make them great. A trainer can take a great ballplayer and make then exceptional. To stay at exceptional takes mental ability to endure and keep on striving to stay at the top of the game.

I think a good and great sales professional has inherit born traits that there environment develops. The ability to communicate, relates, understand, learn, listen, motivation, attitude are gifts that we build upon to transition to exceptional. Personality and appearance can also be altered with help. Once we gain help and we implement what help we receive we can eventually become exceptional in our field.

I do believe that anyone can develop into exceptional sales professionals. I agree with the cost to you statement. What are you willing to pay to become and stay exceptional? What are you willing to do to reach your goals? When you decide to take action towards becoming exceptional you may. - by rich34232
On the language part, I would qualify that these people we are talking about are not disabled by some mental or physical handicap.

Having said that, have you ever seen that movie with Peter Sellers, Being There How appropriate, a movie by Peter "Sellers" LOL

"Chance, (pronounced Chaun-cey) a simple gardener, has never left the estate until his employer dies. His simple TV-informed utterances are mistaken for profundity."

Ever seen a superstar talk themselves out of a sale. Sure the mediocre salesman cost you in lost sales but saying they are not cut out for it is a bit extreme. They might be the only ones to have the patience sort certain types of customers.

"Intermediacy is no road to Mastery" but mastery is not for everyone and does not have to be in order to have a successful career in sales. It's a fact of life.

As a Sales Manager it's hard not to project ones high expectations on mediocre salesmen but you must not but rather trust in their ability to adapt to your accurate assessment and nurturing over time. I know... this is your point... they just don't get it and that's it. As a Sales Manager you Get Better People or Get People Better and having high turn around and instability negatively affects a teams productivity. I guess they are two schools of though or styles of managing.

I would say either a disability or enjoyableness would make someone not cut out for sales. But average/mediocre does not make it an unworthy pursuit. - by Tony_B
Tony, your points are valid and well expressed. However I never mentioned "mediocre" or "average" in my post. Those are your words that describe a relative level of efficiency and/or results.

I said "Intermediacy" and "Intermediate", terms that are used to describe a stage of development. I expressed my view about that stage when I referred to the stage as a myth.

However, where I erred in my post was when I assumed most salespeople would welcome a road to sales mastery. As you pointed out, that is probably not true.

However, we are talking about two different things, and I would not want that to influence readers' perception of the three areas I discussed which I have given much thought to. A lot of thought, a lot of substantiated beliefs, go into posts by myself and some others. I have encouraged a lot of people in my arena by merely asking them to think. I try to think hard about what other contributors are really saying in turn.

You said: "Intermediacy is no road to Mastery" but mastery is not for everyone and does not have to be in order to have a successful career in sales. It's a fact of life."

I agree. It might make an interesting new topic for the forum. - by Ace Coldiron
And the price you might have to pay, depending on who you are today, could be far greater than three weeks or even three months.
Interesting thought GC..................

Could you elaborate please?
Yes, but my reply might be too long for RAT … :) ...!

Seriously, I will try to find time tonight to express some more on that topic.

My only gripe, Gold, is that you right too long. Break things down into smaller pieces... more bite sized. This is MY gripe... not the rest here, because I can't concentrate that long
IN the movie Amedeus, after a musical on opening night, the great composer turned in wonder to see what the King thought of the performance. The Venetian King, not being too musically inclined, turned to his Court Musician, Salieri (18 August 1750 – 7 May 1825), to speak for him. And he indicated in some way that it was not great. “Too many notes” was the quote that stuck in my mind. And Mozart’s answer;

“But I used no more or less notes than I required!”

Great post by Ace … love a few of your points, including but not limited to;

There is a language barrier AND a meaning barrier.

… intermediacy is a MYTH in selling. …DROP the word; Intermediate. If you take solace in that counterfeit label, you are not cut out for sales.

… There is a language barrier AND a meaning barrier.

… Great salespeople do not create YES--they SEE it where others don't.

Amen brother! - by Gold Calling
Steven, I loved that scene.."Too many notes".

The other scene which stuck in my mind is right out of Steven Covey, who said "Seek first to understand, and then to be understood."

The king asked Mozart to listen to Salieri's composition while Salieri is standing there in apprehension. Mozart listens to the whole thing, sits down at the piano, and plays the whole thing from memory, refusing notes, pausing at one part to uttter..."Hmmm...not quite right, is it?"...and then improves upon it as Salieri, his jealous and pompous rival cowers. Mozart, a simple honest genius meant no malice--just searched for the truth. But he listened first. - by Ace Coldiron
It is my opinion that some people are more naturally suited for sales than others both mentally and physically much in the same way that Michael Phelps is more naturally suited for swimming than a 300 lb four foot tall woman. - by Houston
I clicked the submit button before I got to compliment you on these pearls of wisdom. ;sm

Ace Coldiron Quote “To those that think that's ugly news, it's not. You can take the quantum leap TODAY. Just think of yourself differently. And DROP the word, Intermediate. If you take solace in that counterfeit label, you are not cut out for sales.

Lastly, people who dwell in the middle ground between "yes" and "no" and take false comfort in "maybe" are not cut out for sales. Selling is taught in a linear way, but it is too often mistaken for a linear process when sometimes it is not. Great salespeople do not create YES--they SEE it where others don't.”


And of course Gold Callings reference to these outstanding Ace Coldiron quotes;
… There is a language barrier AND a meaning barrier.

… Great salespeople do not create YES--they SEE it where others don't.

:thu
...I said "Intermediacy" and "Intermediate", terms that are used to describe a stage of development. I expressed my view about that stage when I referred to the stage as a myth...
I took intermediacy as a stage of development that has been paused indefinitely.

Merriams: Intermediacy = “the quality or state of being intermediate” … or (One that is in a middle position or state.)

If you are stating that this is a myth then maybe you bring up a paradigm with a completely different set of ramifications of which I would want to explore from that perspective without hijacking this thread; A topic of defining mastery and its practicable applications.

I can see this is going to be a stimulating forum. Thanks for the insight. ;sm - by Tony_B
And thanks for your great insight as well, Tony.

Yes--a good thread. - by Ace Coldiron
Some say this easiest hard hard work there is.................

Mental framing is really the key to being successful in sales, we can express that in many different ways

My experience is that those that dwell on negative relations/experience do very poorly in sales. Unfortunately these same types try to torpedo other peoples sales to make themselves look better while at the same time creating some sort of personal victory.

The others that don't fair so well is because they are without a plan. Without a plan to succeed in sales you might as well start trying to row upstream without a paddle. Sales is an entrepreneurship venture just like a business. Personal & professional success is being self reliant with a goal, and without that goal to succeed.... placate yourself to flipping burgers and serving fries. - by DIAMONDSTAR
At one point I was told I was not cut out for sales. Good thing I did not listen to them. I had to be self made and not rely on any "talent" I thought I may have been born with. And at the end of the day who knows if I was actually born with the talent or not BUT thinking I had none made me work that much harder to gain skill, technique, strategy... and even personality!!


So I believe that if a person WANTS to do sales... they can. If they don't then they should find something else they want to do or are good at. - by Andrea
I believe EVERYONE is cut out for sales.

Now, listen just a moment before you dash off a quick and hasty response to what I'm saying here. This will only take a minute.

Everyone sells every day. You sell based on your attitude, your "abilities", your perceived strengths and weaknesses. Even if you are NOT "in sales", you are still putting forth to your bosses, your co-workers, your families, and your friends what you feel you can and cannot do.

Most people sell themselves WAY short and think they are less capable than they are. You think you can't do something and you’re right. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. You would be shocked if I told you the number of people I've talked with who tell me they can't do this or they can't do that. When I ask them the simple question "WHY?", they get flustered.

They can't seem to answer that question. It's as if they have hit a brick wall. Most people who are in sales and struggle in sales seem to take joy in the struggle! You may be saying “I don’t take joy in my struggle.” You may not take joy in it, but it's something you identify with. It becomes a part of you. Small children are great salespeople. Ask a young child why they love their favorite food, and they will immediately tell you many reasons why it’s their favorite.

If you are struggling in the sales presentation, you need to ask yourself what you can do to improve your chances of success. We live in a day and age where a person can learn anything they set their mind to. There are more books and seminars and trainings to teach you to be a better sales professional than any time in this planet’s history!

When someone turns you down at a presentation, many people immediately start to blame. You blame yourself. You blame your prospect. You blame external events.

Why? Blaming is easier! It’s easier than trying to figure out WHAT REALLY HAPPENED. If you think you’re doing poorly in your sales job, do more studying and practicing and learning. Maybe one small technique you haven’t learned that you could learn might impact your success rate in the business exponentially. You never know until you try, and EVERYONE has room to improve. It’s really that simple.

Mike Mangus - by mikemangus
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