Home > Personal Development > "Intermediacy is no road to Mastery" but....

"Intermediacy is no road to Mastery" but....

Another member said:
"Intermediacy is no road to Mastery" but mastery is not for everyone and does not have to be in order to have a successful career in sales. It's a fact of life."

I thought they would be great for discussion. I agreed with what he said, BTW.

Thoughts? - by Ace Coldiron
My opinion is that Mastery is a choice and is not required to be successful in sales. - by Houston
I strongly believe in that quote for a the simple reason that its hard to achieve complete mastery of the entire sales process. Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses. To say you can master every aspect of sales, would be you fooling yourself. I am a great closer for sales, but I know I need alot of help when it comes to phone ups. I am highly successful in my industry, yet I would not consider myself as mastering the sales process. - by jrboyd
If intermediacy is a stage, then the statement by itself is flawed. In the old days, there were many who didn't pass 6th, 7th, or even 8th grade, like my dad, who was an immigrant to America. These were "intermediate" school grades, and many of these folks went on to be highly successful business people.

I completely agree that to be successful in sales that you have to be successful in sales, and that could be because of enthusiasm and visibility, and have nothing to do with manipulation, recognition, or mastery.

Many salespeople don't speak good english, nor do many athletes, yet they make a fair living, most would say. I think intuition is an ingredient in sales too. I started my sales career selling womens shoes, a frustrating endeavor with moments of real reward, but I did learn one thing, numbers means things.

I went on to become an insurance salesman, following in the footsteps of a filipino minister, who preached life insurance amongst other things, numbers mean things.

Many sales I see daily are a result of positioning, as is the lemonade stand, the fish stand, the roadside vegetable stand, and the door to door sales guy of portuguese sweet bread. Just showing up, sometimes makes the sale, and has more to do with the sale than what I understand, and that would be ME, to be the stage of mastery.

Pharmaceutical Sales provide riches to the sales people, some of whom are my clients too, and numbers mean things. Warehouse sales of wholesale items are a manner of stocking and positioning, and these salesman and beer salesmen hardly say a word... and make handsome incomes. Snap On tools makes fortunes for their sales force by being there... so I'm not really sure what we're measuring... mastery of your time and preparation might be the most important for many sales.

Aloha... tom :cool: - by rattus58
I strongly believe in that quote for a the simple reason that its hard to achieve complete mastery of the entire sales process. Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses. To say you can master every aspect of sales, would be you fooling yourself. I am a great closer for sales, but I know I need alot of help when it comes to phone ups. I am highly successful in my industry, yet I would not consider myself as mastering the sales process.
JR, if we use the word "mastery" as it has been used in other models, comprehensive mastery is not a prerequisite. Think martial arts, fine arts, etc. One can master auto sales, financial sales, etc etc. I could teach a mastery curriculum on the sales interview/conversation area of selling, and teach it at a very high level for effectiveness. I would be hard pressed to even begin teaching account management selling, and other things. But, JR, we all have the opportunity to master what we are drawn to and brings us joy--if we choose to. - by Ace Coldiron
If intermediacy is a stage, then the statement by itself is flawed. In the old days, there were many who didn't pass 6th, 7th, or even 8th grade, like my dad, who was an immigrant to America. These were "intermediate" school grades, and many of these folks went on to be highly successful business people.

I completely agree that to be successful in sales that you have to be successful in sales, and that could be because of enthusiasm and visibility, and have nothing to do with manipulation, recognition, or mastery.

Many salespeople don't speak good english, nor do many athletes, yet they make a fair living, most would say. I think intuition is an ingredient in sales too. I started my sales career selling womens shoes, a frustrating endeavor with moments of real reward, but I did learn one thing, numbers means things.

I went on to become an insurance salesman, following in the footsteps of a filipino minister, who preached life insurance amongst other things, numbers mean things.

Many sales I see daily are a result of positioning, as is the lemonade stand, the fish stand, the roadside vegetable stand, and the door to door sales guy of portuguese sweet bread. Just showing up, sometimes makes the sale, and has more to do with the sale than what I understand, and that would be ME, to be the stage of mastery.

Pharmaceutical Sales provide riches to the sales people, some of whom are my clients too, and numbers mean things. Warehouse sales of wholesale items are a manner of stocking and positioning, and these salesman and beer salesmen hardly say a word... and make handsome incomes. Snap On tools makes fortunes for their sales force by being there... so I'm not really sure what we're measuring... mastery of your time and preparation might be the most important for many sales.

Aloha... tom :cool:
ALL very good and insightful points, much of which I can relate to personally. - by Ace Coldiron
Whew, this thread is going fast. I'll try to keep up with posting but it's a busy morning here at the office.

What’s my point: By “a fact of life” I mean, if one doesn’t realize that ‘mastery is not for everyone,’ as a sales manager you will suffer greatly when managing a real life sales team. As a salesman you will suffer stress and possibly self-esteem, let alone production etc.