Home > Closing > Assumptive Transition vs Overview, Benifit, Permission Transition

Assumptive Transition vs Overview, Benifit, Permission Transition

Curious to see which you guys prefer.

Assumptive Transition is pretty much assuming the sale. I use it alot in my car sales. Pretty much set up with a yes set close technique, then move into an assumptive transition.

Ex. "Now Mr. Customer, this was the color you wanted right? And this does have the sun-roof like you wanted right? You did say you wanted the dual climate control as well, didn't you? So if we can agree to agree on figures, this is the vehicle your looking at taking home today right? Perfect! Follow me."

Overview Benifit Permission Transition is very similiar to the assumptive transition except for one minor difference. You ask the customer's permission to continue with the sale.

Ex. "Now Mr. Customer, this was the color you wanted right? And this does have the sun-roof like you wanted right? You did say you wanted the dual climate control as well, didn't you? So if we can agree to agree on figures, this is the vehicle your looking at taking home today right? Great! What I would like to do is show you a couple different financing options available that will help you own this new vehicle, that alright with you?"

Each has pro's and con's and certain sitituations you may have to use one vs. the other, but which of the two do you prefer to use most of the time? - by jrboyd
yer getting to complicated here for me....

I'm not sure I'm capable of distinguishing the nuances of your examples.

Aloha... :cool: shds; - by rattus58
Only difference, is for the overview, benifit, permission transition, you ask customer's permission to continue, instead of assuming they want to continue. - by jrboyd
I try to envision that whoever sees me wants what I'm selling... thmbp2; ;bg - by rattus58
I would use neither as per your examples.

However, athough I would not endorse it, the Overview, Benefit, Permission transition seems better. - by Ace Coldiron
I would use neither as per your examples.

I agree with Ace. There are very few occasions when you actually over-control conversation, as in your two examples. None that are used when the process is one that involves a co-operative buyer.

There are several closes that use closed probes this way. But they are all in situations where you are "loosing" not in any where you are or appear to be "winning".

This is 1000% better;

"_____________ (you should be on a first name basis by now), you agreed that the color of this vehicle is one you like [don't pause for an answer!] and the sun-roof is a great feature that will allow you to enjoy driving on sunny days [don't pause], and the dual climate control is a perfect option, which gives you _____________ [whatever the benefit is], that leaves me with one question [don't pause]. If I was able to influence the dealer to arrange a great price for you, would that be enough incentive for you to be going home today as the proud new owner of this awesome ____________ (car/truck/van/SUV)?"

And, for God's sake, shut up after that question. The process is restating the benefits, then "any question the answer to which confirms they bought."

If the answer is no, your reply is; "Oh? why not?"

The repeated closed probes is only used when the person has said no and you are not sure why. And, the way you use the statement of features, there is no benefit to them - no reminder of why they love them or will ... use word pictures, it is one of the most powerful techniques in selling. - by Gold Calling
I see how the examples I have aren't the best, and the one you use there G.C. is perfect example of the overview benifit permission transition, because you are asking the customer to proceed with the sale. This is very similiar to a condition close. - by jrboyd
I see how the examples I have aren't the best, and the one you use there G.C. is perfect example of the overview benifit permission transition, because you are asking the customer to proceed with the sale. This is very similiar to a condition close.
I read GCs example over and over, literally projecting myself into his role while "feeling" my own manner of expressing and expressions. Doing that, I was 100% in synch.

A side note: I often do that here because I filter posts through a lens that asks "Is this real sales or sales fiction"?

Good topic, JR. - by Ace Coldiron
I mentioned expressing, and expressions, it would be my style to say "If I was able to influence the dealer to arrange a great price for you, would that be..." in this way:

"If I was able to influence the dealer to arrange a great price for you, and I think I can, would that be... "

The addition of those five words serves to put the prospect on my team, knowing that I am on his, and appeal to his/her better nature. He/she doesn't want me to fail nor be the one that decides I have.

Simply a finesse, but a long-tested one with me. I have used it many times, and on some very large complex sales.

Prospects don't want to tell you that you have failed them when you are showing that you are acting on their behalf. There is a very bright side to human nature. - by Ace Coldiron
I like Gold's choice of words here..." If I was able to influence the dealer to arrange a great price for you, would that be enough incentive for you to be going home today as the proud new owner of this awesome ____________ (car/truck/van/SUV)?"

If I was able to influence is a nice way of coming across if they trust you.
...

JR, your examples at the beginning of your thread are both summary closes with either a would-you-take (WYT) or framing with permission ending.

I need to make the distinction that these are what I call the transition close because you are not closing the deal here. Technically, you are transitioning to the write-up and then to the close. It's an important distinction because it's not IMHO a good place to WYT a person on price (old school) because you are setting up expectations which you are unable to control and you're talking price on your feet. A Major pet peeve of mine since you talk price on your seat, especially if you don't control the price or use the "Higher Authority Close" anyway.


The transition close is one of my favorite specialties and I enjoyed them immensely but you had to line it properly throughout the sale by not talking about price and sticking to the basics of investigating for hot buttons and doing a proper presentation.

When I was lining on the lot I typically used the Minor Point Close ala Joe Verde or many before him. You can do the summary prior but not necessary if you did a great presentation and test drive. Also, my summary is casual conversation with customer involvement which includes yes momentum of them replying to your rhetorical summary questions. I skip the summary and go right into the Minor Point Close here;

Sounds like we found the perfect vehicle. Let’s wrap this up. Did you want a coffee or something cold to drink while I take care of the paperwork?

This is an assumptive close without permission and is easy on the anxiety meter for both parties :)

It's script #99 on Track 5 of my PowerScripts Interactive Audio Sales Training CD for Car Sales Professionals. Just one of 7 examples.

As for a Permission style Framing technique here, I would probably not do it because I would do that long before this pivotal transition point in the sale. I would discuss it near the beginning. In fact this technique has many aspects and deserves its own thread IMO. :)

But just to give an example for this thread I'll add PowerScript #238 on Track 18; (let's assume they had a trade-in for this one)

Before we go over the figures today, what I’d like to do is write down a few details on your trade so we get the best price possible for it. And then if you’d allow me, I’ll put together the paperwork so we can go over how you’d like to pay for the vehicle. Fair enough?

These scripts are great to transition to the write-up and you want to expect objections here so that you are ready to handle them with the basic Handling Objections steps of Clarify, Agree, Isolate, Confirm, and Commit. This Exact technique is available on my Youtube through my websites. It's the Track #11 Sample.

Hope this helps :) - by Tony_B

Sounds like we found the perfect vehicle. Let’s wrap this up. Did you want a coffee or something cold to drink while I take care of the paperwork?

Before we go over the figures today, what I’d like to do is write down a few details on your trade so we get the best price possible for it. And then if you’d allow me, I’ll put together the paperwork so we can go over how you’d like to pay for the vehicle. Fair enough?

:)
Those are two great examples of both an assumptive transition and an overview, benifit, permission transition.

I personally call these mini-closes in the deal, transitions and I do apologize if it causes any one any confusion. These transitions, or mini-closes are getting you one step closer to the final close for the sale. You guys have been giving great examples of the two, but question still remains, which do you prefer to use? I am aware that you may have to use one or another in certain situations, but which of them do you use more frequently?

**One thing to note though is in the permission transition, noted above, Notice that there still is an assumptive transition used in it.

Before we go over the figures today...
So as you see you will almost always be using an assumptive transition regardless of which you prefer. - by jrboyd
JR,

Good point, technically that is assumptive so let’s change the words around a bit to create a better example for this thread.

What I’d like to do now if you’d allow me, is I’ll write down a few details on your old car so we can have the manager give us the best possible price for it and we can continue by sitting down together so I can explain the different financing options available to you. Would you like that?

OR a more simplified and slightly assumptive leaning example,

What I’d like to do now if it’s OK with you, is continue by sitting down together so we can go over your options and how you’d like to pay for the vehicle. Fair enough?

As to which way to I prefer, assumptive or permission tactic I would say that it depends on the customer and how you line up the sale. Since these are sort of opposite in a sense, I wouldn’t change tactics at the transition from the lot to the office.

Also, if during the beginning parts of the sale the customer is not responding to one, they might respond better to the other.

So to pick one favorite over the other… for this poll and my qualifier, I would lean to the assumptive. - by Tony_B
I would like to add a couple more points.

I find most customers respond well to assumptive statements especially if you have not skipped the basic steps of the sale and have done a proper evaluation and presentation.

For the customers that are more sensitive or the aggressive salesman, the permission technique can be more 'neutrally charged' as we call it.

When you find yourself being too assertive, aggressive or over assumptive you may find that you are projecting your fear and anxiety towards the customer. You can hear and feel that in statements and it can even come across as weak, needy or begging.

For this reason it is important to be aware of not only what you say but how you say it, so that your words come across as neutrally charged as well as technically persuasive. - by Tony_B
This is a LEGITIMATE question...

I understand that we can disect a sentence, a phrase, and a close or process. Other than for clinical reasons, and other than the fact that I didn't understand the terms you've advanced here right away (even though I've heard of an assumptive close for example) please enlighten me as to why we have reams of books on the various styles of selling when in MY reality being that a picture being worth a thousands words.... an example is worth a thousand words to me as well.

Personally AND THIS MY OPINION, I don't really care what you call something... for example gray.... you can have a myriad example of gray by having adjustment to a color pallette. I'm not caring what went into it, I like the shade or I don't.

So in my case, rather than call something a name, I'd prefer to see an example and ask me which I would prefer and why.

This is ME WASTING TOO MUCH TIME RATHER THAN WORKING... this morning.... :)

Aloha... ;bg shds; - by rattus58
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