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Creative vs. Retail Selling

One of the popular sales trainers and sales speakers of the mid-Twentieth Century, was Fred Herman. He was also a pioneer in audio training, although in his day it was 33 1/3 rmm vinyl. Earl Nightingale called Herman "The world's greatest sales trainer." I once listened to a segment of one of his talks in which he said that there are two categories of selling, Creative Selling and Retail Selling. He provoked laughs from his audience when he said that creative selling is when you go out and surprise the prospect, and retail selling is when the prospect comes in and surprises you.

Those are not my definitions or descriptions--they're his. His point was that retail selling took less creativity, and that "fact" somewhat accounted for lesser earnings opportunities, Frankly, I thought his bias was transparent. If I HAD to separate all salespeople into just two categories, my categories would not be his, nor would they be in his context. BUT--even an imperfect definition can work as a model for discussion.

SO--does anyone have any thoughts on this? - by Ace Coldiron
I would describe the two types as ......

Selling hamburgers to the starving and selling hamburgers to those who haven't realized they are even hungry.

The first typically takes less effort. - by jdedwa11
Ace,

In my opinion the two different categories of selling are (1) aggressive, persuasive techniques or (2) asking probing questions, listening and fulfilling a need by allowing the client to buy. - by MPrince
This is old school but still true; "The creative salesman helps the buyer express his need. He tries to get the buyer to realize that he has a problem based upon this particular need, and that the product can fulfill that need. In some cases, the buyer may not be aware of his need, which means that he may not realize he has a problem. The salesman must help him first to identify his need, then to establish the general problem, and finally to show how he has the product to help fulfill the need." - by Johnny Fairplay
In some cases, the buyer may not be aware of his need, which means that he may not realize he has a problem. The salesman must help him first to identify his need, then to establish the general problem, and finally to show how he has the product to help fulfill the need."
That was EXACTLY the case when my missuse let the Hoover Vacuum guy in the front door.

Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
One of the popular sales trainers and sales speakers of the mid-Twentieth Century, was Fred Herman. He was also a pioneer in audio training, although in his day it was 33 1/3 rmm vinyl. Earl Nightingale called Herman "The world's greatest sales trainer." I once listened to a segment of one of his talks in which he said that there are two categories of selling, Creative Selling and Retail Selling. He provoked laughs from his audience when he said that creative selling is when you go out and surprise the prospect, and retail selling is when the prospect comes in and surprises you.

Those are not my definitions or descriptions--they're his. His point was that retail selling took less creativity, and that "fact" somewhat accounted for lesser earnings opportunities, Frankly, I thought his bias was transparent. If I HAD to separate all salespeople into just two categories, my categories would not be his, nor would they be in his context. BUT--even an imperfect definition can work as a model for discussion.

SO--does anyone have any thoughts on this?
From our research, he is "right on."

That doesn't mean that if someone has the retail job they are less creative but rather the demand is different.

People who enjoy cold calling are intrinsically very different than those who have the prospect come to them. We found that while sales reps can shift back and forth their income takes a beating when engaged in the style that is not as comfortable.

This prompted our article called: Surf-Turf and Amphibian. (The title looked good at the time :))

Turf: car sales
Surf: cold field calls such as door-to-door sales or phone
Amphibian: they get both worlds as with Realtors.

I am talking about career styles, not when a car salesman occasionally tries to sell a car over the phone.

Turf
When a prospect comes to me there are many lose assumptions that can be made: they know they have a need; they are willing to pay for it; they most likely have the money; they have the time; a good idea of the process, and rapport is not that essential in most circumstances. ( I wanted a Chrysler 300 it didn't matter if the sales rep was on probation)

Surf
In cold calling: I must get their attention; convince them of the need; convince them of the value; often find the money for them, and educate them on the process in a very, very short time, all of which requires extremely effective establishment of rapport and trust.

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What really makes the difference is a sense of security among many other advantages and disadvantages. In an office with people coming to you, there is no issue of self-worth. However, when cold-calling and with most saying "no" that has a very different