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How do you look at yourself as a Sales Professional

I'm in worksite marketing. I'm not anywhere near as sophisticated as probably anyone else on these forums. There are a lot of terms I don't understand, I had to actually google B2B to discover this meant Business to Business, and I'm still wrestling with C-level manager. I know... you're getting a picture of me in a plaid shirt and coveralls, but in the scheme of sales professional I'm wondering what IS the measure of us being professional.

I dress with a tie, slacks, and polished shoes. I wear an AFLAC tie and pin it with an AFLAC pin converted to a tie-tac. A brand.

I use both a white board and power-point to present to my worksite. I use powerpoint to also provide "seminar" presentations to groups like Dentists and other Professionals. I do this mainly to keep me on track with my own thoughts, since I don't think quickly on my feet.... sitting down or asleep is also alleged.

I've read every sales book I could get my hands on with reasonable effort, and have spent thousands on Hopkins, Tracy, hundreds on Ziglar, Bettger, Carnegie,Stone, Action Selling, Girard, Savage,... and some I can't remember even... Feldman... the point being, what have they all done for me towards moulding me into a professional?

I've reduced (this is for my benefit) my professionalism to essentially being prepared. Know what I'm doing with each call. Having the right materials with me and being able to keep the flow going. Do It Now!... Picked that up from some of the above..

I've gone to school. I'm not college, I'm the American College.. took me 20 years from start to finish.. so I've got letters after my name, but 20 years... what have I proven? Even if I had received these designations 20 years ago am I still professional today? Herb True once said to the effect that a Rookie is someone who has stopped doing what he once was doing that made him a professional.

What makes us Professional? Is it conduct? Is it attitude? Is it preparation? What about education? (We are required continuous product and conduct re-education some call it.. :) ) Is it all of the above?

I'm here to learn. I'm here for an education. I've already absorbed tons of useful information. My only gripe is that it doesn't come fast enough. I love sales, I love sales people. I love the debate... and the debait. I love criticism for it gives me new ideas that because of my market, I can try out every day.

Am I a professional... or am I just a peddler? Is it so bad, on the other hand, just being a peddler? If we are just peddlers, can we be professional at it?

This came up, by the way, by someone referencing us (worksite marketers) as peddlers, something I call myself frequently... but it got me thinking about this...

So please, give it a go. I've learnt a tremendous lot from you all so far, so I'd love to have it keep rollin on.... thmbp2;

Aloha.... Tom shds; - by rattus58
Honestly I dont even waste time thinking if I'm a sales proffessional. To be honest, I haven't spent years behind books studying sales. I learned the most important aspects of sales being a street peddlar, going door to door, selling disney books and fish umbrellas. Just recently I have started studying the books, and NLP and such, but in actuallity, all it did was re-enforce what I had already known from the streets.

This isn't me being concided or stuck up, but this is honestly the truth. People that buy a car from me, actually have fun, and enjoy the process, because I make it that way. I am probably one of the goofiest car sales people you will meet, but you know what it works for me. For the month of April I have already sold 2 cars, Grossing over 13k front end profit for the dealership and over 2,000 dollars for myself.

Honestly call me what you will, peddlar, proffesional, goof, it really dont matter, because its just a name. What matters, is a) I know how to sale, and b) I can apply that knowledge to sale. Oh yeah, and me making lots of money doesnt hurt to much either :) - by jrboyd
I have never referred to myself as a sales professional, although I have used the term in conversations. - by Ace Coldiron
Tom...I have read every post you have written on this forum and what I get from you is, honesty, openness and a strong belief in what you are doing and what you are offering to your clients. In my opinion that is professionalism.

Warmest Regards - by MPrince
Martha.... sn; I just know you had a hand in the creation of this smiley.... Thank you for your kind words... When you have to google B2B you begin wonderin if yer not really just still a rookie... :)

On the other hand, I hope I remain a rookie in many ways too... I hope I never lose my drive and enthusiasm for learning and new ideas.

Ace, I'm curious as to why would you never refer to yourself as a sales professional? You seem to consider Sales a Profession and dedicate a good part of your time trying to improving the professional skills of the rest of us. What am I missing here?

Now Jr made me chuckle with his post because I can relate to it. I've not sold cars before but I can appreciate the brash enthusiasm he displays with his propensity for innovation in making it happen.. I can also appreciate Jr's "What matters,is a) I know how to sale, and b) I can apply that knowledge to sale. Oh yeah, and me making lots of money doesnt hurt to much either. "

Sales IN MY OPINION can cross many many levels of interaction. Whether trading dried fish for pipi-kaula (smoked beef) or being on a Debit (door to door insurance sales), peddling cemetary lots and funeral plans, them too being part of my resume', or vacuum cleaners and fuller brushes, Avon, AMWAY, or being a popcorn seller at the movies or the hotdog guy at a ballgame, or Snap-On Tools, Granger, or the route salesmen for Budweiser and Heineken, Frito Lay... we are all creating opportunity or offering solution for something.

In much of sales I can see the natural, the rookie, and the Pro. In others just being there, position, location, timing, makes the sale.

But specifically I wonder how we look at ourselves. I have an opinion though about Jr, and maybe about Ace, and maybe about EVERYONE here.. Why are we here if we don't want to get better at what we do?

This place is like a nutrient for a budding salesperson. Why are we here, would be my question, if we didn't want to grow? Maybe my question should have been, is striving to enhance the growing process of salesmanship an act of professional growth?

Aloha Tom ;bg shds; - by rattus58
Ace, I'm curious as to why would you never refer to yourself as a sales professional? You seem to consider Sales a Profession and dedicate a good part of your time trying to improving the professional skills of the rest of us. What am I missing here?
Well, certainly I value the term. But in answer to your question (which makes me reflect), I suspect that I'm older than most people here. We all go through those stages where Identity seems to be an issue (maybe it's just men.) You reach a point, if you're lucky, where Meaning in life takes center stage.

When I was younger I had same issues I sometimes see in others--a need to find significance in some sort of role. I don't regret that, because it was in those days that I sought to learn as much as I could in the hope I could master selling. So, yes--I acquired knowledge and skills that contributed to a good life and lifestyle. It's not something I'm going to lose. But those things are things I DO, not who I AM. As such, its tough to label myself and its tough to label others who I am close to.

I know that's a longer answer than you wanted, and I apologize. Your question, for some reason, made me think. - by Ace Coldiron
Tom...I have read every post you have written on this forum and what I get from you is, honesty, openness and a strong belief in what you are doing and what you are offering to your clients. In my opinion that is professionalism.

Warmest Regards
I agree with you 100%!! - by natalie_rene014
[/quote]But those things are things I DO, not who I AM.[/quote]

I believe it is the things we do which create what we become.

Thoughts become words. Words become actions. Actions become habits. Habits become character. Character becomes destiny. - by natalie_rene014
But those things are things I DO, not who I AM.[/quote]

I believe it is the things we do which create what we become.

Thoughts become words. Words become actions. Actions become habits. Habits become character. Character becomes destiny.[/quote]

Natalie

You and Tom will get a long great. He is a word master as well.

Martha - by MPrince
Well, certainly I value the term. But in answer to your question (which makes me reflect), I suspect that I'm older than most people here. We all go through those stages where Indentity seems to be an issue (maybe it's just men.) You reach a point, if you're lucky, where Meaning in life takes center stage.

When I was younger I had same issues I sometimes see in others--a need to find significance in some sort of role. I don't regret that, because it was in those days that I sought to learn as much as I could in the hope I could master selling. So, yes--I acquired knowledge and skills that contributed to a good life and lifestyle. It's not something I'm going to lose. But those things are things I DO, not who I AM. As such, its tough to label myself and its tough to label others who I am close to.

I know that's a longer answer than you wanted, and I apologize. Your question, for some reason, made me think.
Hi Ace... hpy3;

You'd a had to have been born before 46 to be older than me, so I suspect we enjoy some of the same creaks together....

I'm not sure I was thinking of an identity. When I think of identity, I think of me. When I think of Professionalism, I'm more thinking of how the experience affects you. However, for me this is getting into deeper waters than I care to tread without my rubber ducky.. :)

"But those things are things I DO, not who I AM"

Hmmmmmm.... I know we could set the stage for some kind of study, probably psychiatric, with this statement of yours, and excuse me for asking... but as Natalie and Mary/Martha have both stated, but are we not what we do? I know you're not Jack the Knife.... are you?... kiddding kiddding.. but in the manner of salesmanship... how do you behave/act professionally and not be professional, I guess would be my question.

Aloha... Tom :cool: shds; - by rattus58
"But those things are things I DO, not who I AM"

Hmmmmmm.... I know we could set the stage for some kind of study, probably psychiatric, with this statement of yours, and excuse me for asking... but as Natalie and Mary/Martha have both stated, but are we not what we do? I know you're not Jack the Knife.... are you?... kiddding kiddding.. but in the manner of salesmanship... how do you behave/act professionally and not be professional, I guess would be my question.

Aloha... Tom :cool: shds;
Sorry, Tom. I know you're sincere in your remarks but this thread bothers me for some reason. Best left unsaid. - by Ace Coldiron
When the future Hall of Famer, Thurmon Thomas scored his first touchdown in an NFL game, he danced in the end zone. When he came back to the sidelines, his future Hall of Fame head coach said, "Don't ever do that again. Act like you've been there before!" - by Ace Coldiron
[quote=Ace Coldiron;40930]When the future Hall of Famer, Thurmon Thomas scored his first touchdown in an NFL game, he danced in the end zone. When he came back to the sidelines, his future Hall of Fame head coach said, "Don't ever do that again. Act like you've been there before!"[/quote]

Hi Ace.... :)

My wife tells this all the time ... she says I've an Adult Deficit Disorder..... sn;

Much Aloha.... shds; - by rattus58
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