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What Customer Personality Type Do You Find Is Easiest to Sell To?

As salespeople, we come from all four of the personality types below. Which do you find it easiest to sell to? (After you vote in the poll, please post a comment and tell us which of the four personality types YOU are.

1. Direct, Firm, Results-oriented
2. Outgoing, Enthusiastic, Optimistic
3. Analytical, Reserved, Precise
4. Even-tempered, Accommodating, Patient - by Skip Anderson
Very interesting post skip. Now for those of us who can actually recognize the different styles, most of us will adjust our presentation to fit those personality styles. Personally, I find I can adjust the presentation to fit each of these, therefor don't have alot problems with any of them, and can't honestly say that one is easier than the other. Since presentations are different, it's not really comparing apples to apples.

I'm a Direct or Drive personality type btw. - by jrboyd
3. Analytical, Reserved, Precise

I believe I have a competitive advantage with that type, although I'm successful with all 4 types. - by Ace Coldiron
I think the easiest to sell to is number two because they are usually more fun and open to talking but it depends on the product.

As for me, I'm a chameleon. It would be more fun to find out from the forum which of the four you think I lean towards most. At least in this forum. (Pandora's Box?) ;) - by Tony_B
As salespeople, we come from all four of the personality types below. Which do you find it easiest to sell to? (After you vote in the poll, please post a comment and tell us which of the four personality types YOU are.

1. Direct, Firm, Results-oriented
2. Outgoing, Enthusiastic, Optimistic
3. Analytical, Reserved, Precise
4. Even-tempered, Accommodating, Patient
Now we're getting in over my head again. I think that I go along with Jr in that somehow I'm adjusting to my client. If I'm having difficulty with a client type, and I'm only now thinking about this... since this came up... thank you... stcktng; but when I'm stuck with a client, I've never hurt myself by asking them... "Look, if you were to move forward with this, what is it you need to see from me in order to make this work?"

Whatever they tell me, I'll try to quantify (is that the right word?) and adjust the presentations future to what they expect.

I need to think about this some more or maybe take an aspirin... that's what happens when you're a ST. Joe Grad..... :)

Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
I think you guys might be missing a valuable lesson that can be derived from Skip's question. - by Ace Coldiron
I think you guys might be missing a valuable lesson that can be derived from Skip's question.
I'm missing something here.... what lesson are you referring? First i don't know I totally understand all of what we're talking about, two, I appreciate anyones comment as being as they are, but I'm not a deep thinker.

Aloha... Tom :cool: shds; - by rattus58
I'm missing something here.... what lesson are you referring? First i don't know I totally understand all of what we're talking about, two, I appreciate anyones comment as being as they are, but I'm not a deep thinker.

Aloha... Tom :cool: shds;
The most "difficult" profile of prospects is usually the driest tinder to get a leg up on your competition. And when you get a leg up on your competition, you increase market share and your own sales.

I've been around long enough to know that, in my own arenas, Skip's #3 Category is a category much of my competition avoids.

Skip's question can get people to look at themselves. But it can also get people to look at the market segments. Who was it that said "Know yourself. Know the _______ ?" (Can't remember the rest!)

Pardon the metaphors.

I'll give you a cross reference separate and aside from Skips's profiles. In the real world many salespeople dread dealing with certain ethnic groups because of the groups' cultural tendencies to buy and negotiate in a certain manner that the salespeople would sooner avoid. Those groups buy. The key is to go after the markets that others avoid - by Ace Coldiron
The most "difficult" profile of prospects is usually the driest tinder to get a leg up on your competition. And when you get a leg up on your competition, you increase market share and your own sales.

I've been around long enough to know that, in my own arenas, Skip's #3 Category is a category much of my competition avoids.

Skip's question can get people to look at themselves. But it can also get people to look at the market segments. Who was it that said "Know yourself. Know the _______ ?" (Can't remember the rest!)

Pardon the metaphors.

I'll give you a cross reference separate and aside from Skips's profiles. In the real world many salespeople dread dealing with certain ethnic groups because of the groups' cultural tendencies to buy and negotiate in a certain manner that the salespeople would sooner avoid. Those groups buy. The key is to go after the markets that others avoid
One of the fortunes of doing business in Hawaii is you grow up with all these "cultural differences" and realize that we all do business with the same set of rules ... I want, you got, we trade...

If you do business with someone FROM say Japan, China, or Taiwan, for the most part, in our industry anyway, they want to do business with us and will fly here to get it done. Doing business where we are "selling" to them requires generally that you involve a middle man if you're new to the scene to lead you through the maze of formalities. I'm not in that legue... :)

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
I'm a Direct or Drive personality type btw.
Really? We didn't notice!

I enjoy selling at the highest level, that means most of the buyers are very intellelligent and can be highly analytical. That does not mean they are not fun (had a great gal at a 500 employee automated bakery yesterday).

I guess what I am saying is, people can be analytical and outgoing - they can be both fun and precise though maybe not reserved. In my opinion, the lines are blurry ... I choose not to vote for that reason. - by Gold Calling
:-P Does it show that much GC?

I follow the D.I.S.C. personality traits, and honestly I believe all sucessful sales consultants have a High D (Drive or Dominant)personality, and a High I (Influential) personality type. - by jrboyd
:-P Does it show that much GC?

I follow the D.I.S.C. personality traits, and honestly I believe all sucessful sales consultants have a High D (Drive or Dominant)personality, and a High I (Influential) personality type.
What is a High I (Influential) personality type?

Can you give an example--perhaps somebody well known? - by Ace Coldiron
As for me, I'm a chameleon.
The site begs for examples. Could you give us an example of how you would apply your inner chameleon to the 3. Analytical, Reserved, Precise Type? - by Ace Coldiron
LOL

Here is a recent example from last weekend of me being a chameleon towards the analytical, reserved, precise category.

I was out shopping for a new car and my whole interaction with the salesman at the dealership was precise. I'm sure I came across as analytical by asking for concise explanations of his presentation features that were important to me. I was reserved in not making any assumptions, passing judgment or tipping my hand. I spoke little except for minor rapport and asked precise questions to find facts about the car and the value and the costs.

I was very tactical in my inquiries as to the length of time the car was in inventory, why others have bought it or what they chose instead. I was calculating in how I set up the negotiation for a value perspective and a other more subtle perspectives.

I was not pushy, and I even walked away from the initial negotiation upon mutual agreement. I was not attached emotionally to the product nor was I too patient or optimistic.

I may have displayed some of the characteristics in the three other categories but I was at least 80% a number 3

The site begs for examples. Could you give us an example of how you would apply your inner chameleon to the 3. Analytical, Reserved, Precise Type?
- by Tony_B
I may have displayed some of the characteristics in the three other categories but I was at least 80% a number 3
What do you believe would be most effective in selling to number 3 types? We can compare notes.

I've seen the movie, and play, Twelve Angry Men. One of the jurors is the perfect archetype for a number 3 profile. I found that his ultimate decision process was identical to those in that category I have often sold to. Interestingly, they have an objective and forgiving nature where they keep their compassion under wraps--but it is there nonetheless. - by Ace Coldiron
What do you believe would be most effective in selling to number 3 types? We can compare notes.

I've seen the movie, and play, Twelve Angry Men. One of the jurors is the perfect archetype for a number 3 profile. I found that his ultimate decision process was identical to those in that category I have often sold to. Interestingly, they have an objective and forgiving nature where they keep their compassion under wraps--but it is there nonetheless.
I would whole heartedly agree about the compassion since I married one ;bg

Twelve Angry Men is an awesome movie. Loved it!

I'll have to think about it since i have a lot on my plate today and lunch is over. Since it's your specialty, why don't you start Ace. - by Tony_B
I would whole heartedly agree about the compassion since I married one ;bg

Twelve Angry Men is an awesome movie. Loved it!

I'll have to think about it since i have a lot on my plate today and lunch is over. Since it's your specialty, why don't you start Ace.
Prospects in the Number 3 category look for transparency and will often move away from you if they see it. I do well with that type largely because in selling I respond to questions in a manner found among many advanced salespeople, but seldom seen among amateurs. I convey THOUGHTS instead of bare answers. In so doing, that type of prospect will evaluate my thoughts instead of judging my answer. New salespeople are taught to avoid the effects of rejection by never placing themselves on the line. I ignore that platitude. - by Ace Coldiron
What is a High I (Influential) personality type?

Can you give an example--perhaps somebody well known?
The four choices fI used in this poll are descriptions of the four DiSC personality profile:

D = Dominance (Direct, results-oriented, firm, i.e. Donald Trump, Judge Judy) - option 1 in the poll
I = Influence (Outgoing, enthusiastic, optimistic, i.e. Ellen DeGeneres, Robin Williams) - option 2 in the poll
S = Steadiness (Even-tempered, accommodating, patient, like Andy Griffeth, Paula Abdul, Barney) - option 4 in the poll
C = Conscientiousness (Analytical, reserved, precise, i.e. Al Gore, Spock from Star Trek) - option 3 in the poll - by Skip Anderson
The four choices fI used in this poll are descriptions of the four DiSC personality profile:

D = Dominance (Direct, results-oriented, firm, i.e. Donald Trump, Judge Judy) - option 1 in the poll
I = Influence (Outgoing, enthusiastic, optimistic, i.e. Ellen DeGeneres, Robin Williams) - option 2 in the poll
S = Steadiness (Even-tempered, accommodating, patient, like Andy Griffeth, Paula Abdul, Barney) - option 4 in the poll
C = Conscientiousness (Analytical, reserved, precise, i.e. Al Gore, Spock from Star Trek) - option 3 in the poll
Ok... I'm with ya with Trump being dominant... I can see that.
I can see Ellen DeGeneres at outgoing... but I sure don't see Williams as "outgoing, optimistic or even enthusiastic.
Andy Griffeth I can see.... Paula Abdul and Barney I'm having real trouble with...
Are we talking about the Vice President Al Gore? If so... I've got an entirely different understanding of Coscientiousness... and I sure don't see him as analytical, nor reserved, nor in any way precise... Spock.... my hero.... thmbp2;

What this proves to me, is that ones perceptions belong to oneself and that some others may share pieces of your perceptions with you and may have a blended vision of reality. These are all my OPINIONS which of course are owned by me alone and I suffer their wisdom or failure all by myself.

Much Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Ok... I'm with ya with Trump being dominant... I can see that.
I can see Ellen DeGeneres at outgoing... but I sure don't see Williams as "outgoing, optimistic or even enthusiastic.
Andy Griffeth I can see.... Paula Abdul and Barney I'm having real trouble with...
Are we talking about the Vice President Al Gore? If so... I've got an entirely different understanding of Coscientiousness... and I sure don't see him as analytical, nor reserved, nor in any way precise... Spock.... my hero.... thmbp2;

What this proves to me, is that ones perceptions belong to oneself and that some others may share pieces of your perceptions with you and may have a blended vision of reality. These are all my OPINIONS which of course are owned by me alone and I suffer their wisdom or failure all by myself.

Much Aloha... Tom :cool:
Tom, in which of the 4 categories would you place Robin Williams, Paula Abdul, Barney, and Al Gore?

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Well from my perspective I would put Al Gore as Dour. Actually I look at Al Gore as Constipated.

Paula Abdul, for example, I consider an Air Head... I don't mean that in a negative way, but I don't see her as "steady". This is just my opinion based upon what I've seen of her. I'm not challenging your viewpoint on anyone because your view of them could be entirely different than mine. If we were to evaluate someone, we should do it from looking at the same performance so the comparison is valid


Much Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Well from my perspective I would put Al Gore as Dour. Actually I look at Al Gore as Constipated.

Paula Abdul, for example, I consider an Air Head... I don't mean that in a negative way, but I don't see her as "steady". This is just my opinion based upon what I've seen of her. I'm not challenging your viewpoint on anyone because your view of them could be entirely different than mine. If we were to evaluate someone, we should do it from looking at the same performance so the comparison is valid


Much Aloha... shds; ;bg
Tom, I think we've seen that the Science of Selling crosses over into other sciences as is the nature of science in general. But for the sake of discussions on on how we sell to various "personality types", can we leave out proctology? - by Ace Coldiron
Well from my perspective I would put Al Gore as Dour. Actually I look at Al Gore as Constipated.

Paula Abdul, for example, I consider an Air Head... I don't mean that in a negative way, but I don't see her as "steady". This is just my opinion based upon what I've seen of her. I'm not challenging your viewpoint on anyone because your view of them could be entirely different than mine. If we were to evaluate someone, we should do it from looking at the same performance so the comparison is valid


Much Aloha... shds; ;bg
Since "Dour", "Air Head" are not included in the four DiSC personality types, If you wish to discuss the personality types, could you please share with us which of the categories you think those two people belong in since you disagreed with me initially?

This thread is about personality types, not our personal likes or dislikes of particular individuals, and it's certainly not about politics. I know from other threads you seem to have strong political views, but there are other forums to share those discussions - it's not appropriate here imo, unless it applies directly to selling/marketing/business. - by Skip Anderson
Ok... I got wiped out again.

Skip I don't DISAGREE with you. You and I are operating under two different sets of circumstances, obviously, because neither Al Gore nor Paula Abdul, whom I like, fit ANY of the categories you listed IN MY OPINION.

If DISC provides for ONLY those categories, then they must have a means of stuffing other categories into their defined "boxes".

What category would Constipated fit? That would be Al Gore. Paula Abdul, this now is according to my wife, fits Loopy. Where does that fit into DISC?

Aloha.... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Ok... I got wiped out again.

Skip I don't DISAGREE with you. You and I are operating under two different sets of circumstances, obviously, because neither Al Gore nor Paula Abdul, whom I like, fit ANY of the categories you listed IN MY OPINION.

If DISC provides for ONLY those categories, then they must have a means of stuffing other categories into their defined "boxes".

What category would Constipated fit? That would be Al Gore. Paula Abdul, this now is according to my wife, fits Loopy. Where does that fit into DISC?

Aloha.... Tom :cool:
In the DiSC paradigm, all individuals have all four components of the personality types to some degree, and every individual has one of the four as their dominant personality trait. That means you could be a high "S", but also have a fairly high "D".

With DiSC, all people have high either a high D, high I, high S, or high C. That would include Al Gore and Paula Abdul, since they are people. If Mr. Gore and Ms. Abdul were to take the DiSC, they would indeed be identified as having a high score in one of the four.

I'm not aware of any psychological instruments that report an assessment-taker's "constipation" or "loopiness." I'm not sure who would want to buy such an assessment.

DiSC divides the population into 4 groups; Myers-Briggs divides the population into 16 groups. Other assessments use different paradigms. No assessment instrument can tell everything about someone's personality- we're all unique, and no assessment could do that even if we wanted to.

Understanding personality types can help the salesperson because if we understand what makes certain types tick, we can customize the way we interact with different prospects so that we can fully engage the prospect rather than be butting heads with them.

I have to say, I'm surprised that, as of this writing, I think only 4 people have bothered to vote in the poll! Come on people! Weigh in! Thanks ;bg - by Skip Anderson
Hi Skip,

In order to utilize these types of approaches, you have to be more analytical than I'm capable of. I'm sure I'm dealing with these personality types somehow without being able to identify how I'm doing it. I can tell you that when I feel myself coming to impasse with someone, I'm very likely to ask you "Mrs. Youbringsunshinetoyouroffice, what do you need to see from us in order that you'd be comfortable enough with this to move forward with a program/plan/strategy such as we're discussing?

Once we get an answer to that, we can start exploring again... or not, but gives us opportunity to refocus and restart.

Aloha.... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Okay...I missed most of this conversation and I can't say I'm sorry but I would like to answer it...I sell better to D personality and the reason for that is...you never have to guess where you stand and they let you know what they want and what they expect. I like that.

As for my personality type I am a high S with D traits. - by MPrince
Hi Martha.... :)

I like that.. my wife however, is High Maintenance and gots De Checkbook.... :)

Much Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Hi Martha.... :)

I like that.. my wife however, is High Maintenance and gots De Checkbook.... :)

Much Aloha... shds; ;bg

Very Funny Tim/Tom - by MPrince
2. Outgoing, Enthusiastic, Optimistic

I find this group to be the easiest grouping to help discover their needs.Thye seem to readily accept the proposal and solution and want the rpoblem to disappear.

However the type client I love working with the most and is my most enjoyable would be the client who is fearful of being taken. These are the clients who run our to meet you when you arrive and demand a priceThey also are the ones who explain the problem and do not want a diagnostic evualuation.

They have been taken by unethical sales people in the past and distrust all whom pass by their door.I love building the relationship with this type client. I must prove myself worthy of thier time and guide them slowly into the ownership exchange.I like this type client due to being the most challenging client to find a way to open up and gain trust. - by rich34232
I feel the personality type "easiest" to sell for any individual would be a similar type as the salesperson doing the selling. Therefore, "easiest" may be more perception than reality. It's a proven fact the presentation should handle the emotional concerns of the customer type, and the closer the presenter is to matching the personality type, the greater the odds are of making the sale.

I am interested in knowing more about the process of "identifying" the type in front of me. I studied the body language of the handshake years ago and found understanding the typology conveyed through a basic handshake very helpful in setting up the sale per personality type. - by Soldya
I think number two is the easiest to sell to because they seem to be open to compromise and/or suggestions. I find precise customers can be a bit difficult because I usually want to discuss the products and give advice, yet these customers tend to be very direct.

I would call myself number 3 but it's hard to tell when looking at yourself. - by Thufir
Strangely, I've found my easiest sales are with people who fit into #1, but who are so ornery would be considered by other sales folk as absolute jerks.

For some reason, if I run into a jackass, I know I'm about to make a sale. I think it's my ability to "Be Like Water" (Buddha) that diffuses them and puts on a similar path to a pleasant sale, whereas they strike up resonant negativities in other sales pros, leading to war.

Sometimes seems that the people who do the most research build up the heaviest resistance to being 'SOLD', and are only waiting for someone who'll respect their (sometimes self-assumed) insightfulness and treat them as partners in the process. Even the ones who are so desperate to maintain control over a sales person that they want to 'lead them around' really just wants to feel like they've got a partner, because deep down even they are afraid that they don't truly know what they're doing. - by DynamicMentalFitness
I think you'll find that few people sell to a "personality type" as, generally, in sales you don't know the customer that intimately for you to assess their personality, which involves values and beliefs. More accurately what you sell to is "observable behaviour types" which means that you are watching their actions and reactions and communicating accordingly. In sales it is important to know this difference because in seeking solutions you can describe behaviour without attempting to diagnose personality which is best left to the professionals, namely psychologists and psychiatrists - by Market People

Skip's question can get people to look at themselves. But it can also get people to look at the market segments. Who was it that said "Know yourself. Know the _______ ?" (Can't remember the rest!)
Ace

If you're slightly curious: The original comment was "know thyself" from ancient Greece, The Temple of Apollo, Delphi. It was later quoted by Socrates and brought to us through Plato. There has been many variations since then such as "know yourself..etc."

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You raise a very good point that everyone in selling should consider.

We all tend to sell to who we resonate best with and avoid those who are antithetical in our attitudes and beliefs.

This absolutely impacts the bottom line because viable prospects are being unconsciously bypassed.

For example, studies show a pragmatist unconsciously tends to sell and often prospect other pragmatists.The reason: rapport is almost immediate, giving the sales rep a boost of confidence which is felt by the potential buyer. This level of connectivity then enhances the overall experience of both, elevating the possibility of a sale.

Conversely it was demonstrated, that a pragmatist avoids those of the the art community for example, as these people are perceived as being "scattered brained" and are overall irrational. Once the pragmatist saw his bias, a new prospect list was drawn that included the "scattered people." He discovered they were not as scattered as he thought and his bottom line enjoyed a 22% increase 60 days.

While seasoned sales people do sell to all types, there is a ratio between these types and selling results. Everyone in sales should profile all those who bought from them and see if there is a pattern. This insight is an effective tool in breaking through our natural insulation. - by John Voris
Conversely it was demonstrated, that a pragmatist avoids those of the the art community for example, as these people are perceived as being "scattered brained" and are overall irrational. Once the pragmatist saw his bias, a new prospect list was drawn that included the "scattered people." He discovered they were not as scattered as he thought and his bottom line enjoyed a 22% increase 60 days.

While seasoned sales people do sell to all types, there is a ratio between these types and selling results. Everyone in sales should profile all those who bought from them and see if there is a pattern. This insight is an effective tool in breaking through our natural insulation.
Good stuff being posted here, John.

I happen to be a pragmatist who believes in magic so my best comment would be to say I am presently smiling.

However I will add that it is a huge asset in sales to be multidimensional. My clients range from the artsy to the bean counter. And--I learned to talk the language of both. - by Gary A Boye
Good stuff being posted here, John.

I happen to be a pragmatist who believes in magic so my best comment would be to say I am presently smiling.

However I will add that it is a huge asset in sales to be multidimensional. My clients range from the artsy to the bean counter. And--I learned to talk the language of both.
At first glance it appears that you gather meaning holistically while generating pragmatic results. That is an ideal combo for anyone in sales.

In contrast, while a surgeon can think randomly he or she cannot afford to gather meaning holistically unless they claim to be a Psychic Surgeon.

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I have a question for you: what is your toleration level, away from business, for truly ignorant (or stupid) people who insist on imposing their perspective on you and demand you comply? - by John Voris
Customers who are:

Direct, Firm, Results-oriented: can be harder than other customer personality types to sell to because although they are direct and result-oriented, they can also be quick-tempered.

Outgoing, Enthusiastic, Optimistic
: customers are easy to talk to, but I'm not quite sure if they are easier to sell.

Analytical, Reserved, Precise: In my opinion, I think customers who are analytical, reserved, and precise are the customers worth fighting for. It might take some time and more work to win them over, but these are the customers that will continue with your service/product if satisfied.

Even-tempered, Accommodating, Patient: is great character traits but do they make the best customers? I again am not quite sure;wi - by Michael Dalton Johnson
I have a question for you: what is your toleration level, away from business, for truly ignorant (or stupid) people who insist on imposing their perspective on you and demand you comply?
Different ways to respond to your question, John.

One way would be to say you have asked me a question you already know the answer to.

If I zeroed more into the semantics, I'll say that I teach people not to place such demands on me. My absence helps. If I'm forced to share their company, and I have been, I tune them out. But their ignorance and stupidity is often in harmony with their lack of awareness that I am even tuning them out.

Tolerance: There's that word zero gain. - by Gary A Boye
The world is full of people who each of us might think are stupid or ignorant or both. In my opinion that does not give us the right to be rude. I believe you can handle anyone with grace. Maybe it comes from motherhood but I have the ability to nod, smile, etc. on que without actually listening and without offending.

My question is; how do you know that others are not saying negative things about you behind your back? They may think you are a Know-it-All or You think you are smarter than anyone else? - by MPrince
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