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How soon do you begin negotiating?

In my field, it is rather easy to close a deal. We do offer the best product in the industry, are the best in customer satisfaction and have the lowest prices (at least this is the information I've been given by my predecessors and from what I've gathered through research, seems to be true). As I sit in my bubble, waiting on a call, studying and practicing, I love to listen in on the calls that are going on around me. I constantly hear my peers flat out ARGUING with the prospects WAY before qualification. I mean, during my presentations, it rarely comes down to negotiation. Of course, my callers always have questions that need answered, but it hasn't taken me long to find the right way to explain it to them so that there will be no argument.
What do you all think? Is it the same way in your field? Do you constantly face challenges that lead to HARD CORE negotation? Just curious :-) It's a slow day!
stcktng; - by natalie_rene014
Hi Natalie

Negotiations can be hard core and much often depends on the type of business/sales you are in. However, I believe you can keep that part of the sales process much more civil by building value through the sales process. Which it seems you are doing and doing very well. You have come a long way since your first post! Congratulations!

Martha - by MPrince
In my field, it is rather easy to close a deal. We do offer the best product in the industry, are the best in customer satisfaction and have the lowest prices (at least this is the information I've been given by my predecessors and from what I've gathered through research, seems to be true). As I sit in my bubble, waiting on a call, studying and practicing, I love to listen in on the calls that are going on around me. I constantly hear my peers flat out ARGUING with the prospects WAY before qualification. I mean, during my presentations, it rarely comes down to negotiation. Of course, my callers always have questions that need answered, but it hasn't taken me long to find the right way to explain it to them so that there will be no argument.
What do you all think? Is it the same way in your field? Do you constantly face challenges that lead to HARD CORE negotation? Just curious :-) It's a slow day!
Hi Natalie.... I'm with Mary/Martha on this too... and as they say... "you've come a long way baby" ... Ok Ok.... just some gratuitous sexist endorsement of your progress.... sn;

You're absolutely correct in NOT arguing with your callers. Not only is that unprofessional, not only will that cost sales, not only will that cost reputation, not only will that destroy your consultive frame of mind... it destroys communications... when you're arguing you're not asking, when you're not asking, or answering their questions in an informative way, you're not helping.

I love to listen in on my sons calls and to have him critique mine... says I'm always critical of his so I give him payback.... :) You learn a lot from listening to calls especially if you've both sides to listen to.

Good job... good job.... thmbp2;

Aloha... shds; - by rattus58
Hi Natalie,

Just to chime in here and discuss a nuance - I'd disagree that it "rarely comes down to negotiating" - rather, I believe you're just negotiating effectively from the start.

We're all negotiating every day - if it's not haggling over price, then you've done a good job on the front end of describing the value you bring. Just because it's not difficult doesn't mean it's not negotiating. In fact, I'd venture to say that BECAUSE it's effective negotiating, you're not finding it difficult...

Stephen - by sfrenkel
negotiating = just one factor in selling, use when appropriate.

arguing = not good for anybody - by Skip Anderson
HARD CORE negotiation is NOT part of the selling process.

However SELLING can be part of the negotiation process. In those cases, the negotiation can become much less hard core. - by Ace Coldiron
My interest in this thread centres around the use of 'HARD CORE'.

(and please excuse my British spellings)

This would imply beliefs concerning adversarial negotiations, of the sort that typically concern writers like Karrass, the pioneer of negotiation training in the USA, and others like Ringer (another populist author from the old days) and Camp, who has put out some more recent work. This list is far from exhaustive - but only illustrative, as anyone with any background in the subject matter will know.

Contrast this to the principled, or 'win-win' school of negotiation practitioners, promoted in the USA mainly by the Harvard academics pioneered chiefly by Fisher & Ury; 'Getting to Yes' being their main treatise.

These two approaches are only extremes of a one continuum on matters, that encompasses a very limited perspective of the totality of the subject.

Lax and Seb