Home > Closing > The Top 10 Sales Closes of All-time

The Top 10 Sales Closes of All-time

If you were to put together a list of the top 10 sales closes of all time which sales closes would you include? - by Community Mailbox
I've absolutely no idea what you're talking about. How about giving an example of one of them? - by rattus58
Here are fifteen oldies but goodies. Choose any ten you like:
  • Minor-point method
  • Order-form method
  • Name-spelling method
  • Pro and con method
  • Reversed-position method
  • Transfer method
  • Last-chance method
  • Focusing-attention method
  • Implied-ownership method
  • Referral-to-authority method
  • Assuming-a-close method
  • Doubt-elimination method
  • Free-trial method
  • Objection method
  • Showdown method
- by Johnny Fairplay
It's amazing I've lasted this long. - by rattus58
Silent close
last ditch close
assumtive
either or
presentation paper close
puppy dog close
yes close
ask for it close
door knowb close
not a fan of the ben franklin close
sandwich close
combining the different closing techniques becomes an effective way to ask for the sale - by rich34232
I've complained about this before, and if this is to be a closed club, that's fine too, but I asked for an example of one of these closes and wind up seeing a dozen more that are really meaningless to me.

So, from the standpoint of helpfulness, for me... this is a top ten waste of time. - by rattus58
I've complained about this before, and if this is to be a closed club, that's fine too, but I asked for an example of one of these closes and wind up seeing a dozen more that are really meaningless to me.

So, from the standpoint of helpfulness, for me... this is a top ten waste of time.
Tom, I'll probably get hate mail for this but I'm too old to care. I've been selling now into my fifth decade. I have the highest closing ratio of anybody I have ever known OR KNOWN OF. Although I am educated enough in sales lore to provide a description or example of every "sales close" on this thread, I DO NOT take them seriously. Although I know some top producers who use a few of them at a deeply advanced and understood level, I have not seen much in the way of understanding of those closes on this forum. Bulleted lists don't put a dime in my pocket. - by Ace Coldiron
I'm having trouble visualizing you getting hate mail sn; .

I envy anyone who can retain a lot of the theory of sales. I have problems going from day to day... that's why i have to write stuff down and review it everyday... although I do know the Ben Franklin close.... ;bg

Much Aloha,

Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
I've complained about this before, and if this is to be a closed club, that's fine too, but I asked for an example of one of these closes and wind up seeing a dozen more that are really meaningless to me.
Here is an example of one of those closes. "Pro-and-con Method: Many salespeople summarize their presentation and start their decision-making activities by writing out a list of the reasons for or against the proposition. For example, in one column they might include all of the prospect's reasons for wanting a later delivery. In another column they might itemize all of the reasons why the prospect will benefit from an immediate delivery. The salesperson then asks the prospect to compare the two, in order to help her make the right decision. Then he asks for the order. This is sometimes called the close-by-contrast method." - by Johnny Fairplay
Here is an example of one of those closes. "Pro-and-con Method: Many salespeople summarize their presentation and start their decision-making activities by writing out a list of the reasons for or against the proposition. For example, in one column they might include all of the prospect's reasons for wanting a later delivery. In another column they might itemize all of the reasons why the prospect will benefit from an immediate delivery. The salesperson then asks the prospect to compare the two, in order to help her make the right decision. Then he asks for the order. This is sometimes called the close-by-contrast method."
Hi Johnny Fairplay... :)

Thank you... I know that as the Ben Franklin Close, you have identified it as Close by Contrast and Pro and Con.... sn;

This is why I like people to illustrate what they discuss here, or right off say that this is for everyone else but the Rat... who wouldn't understand.... :cu

Thanks for the illustration....

Much Aloha... Tom shds; - by rattus58
That is not an example of the Ben Franklin Close. In the Ben Franklin Close as it is popularly taught, the salesperson assists with the column that has "reasons for" and then offers almost no assistance in creating the "reasons against" column. It's tantamount to stacking the deck, in that the "reasons for" column gets filled.

GMAC taught it as the A-B Comparison when they were offering training on leasing against buying. - by Ace Coldiron
I know I'll get an argument from one fellow on this forum whose sales mind I greatly admire, but I'll say this anyway.

Closing is not an event. The closest thing I have ever heard that describes what it really is was stated as "a series of incremental decisions leading to consumation of a sale". Sometimes the word "minor" is included as an adjective for decisions.

Still--that is not quite right, so I'll state it here:

Closing in sales is a progression of consent. - by Ace Coldiron
I do not know what anyone knows or does not know. What is not known ,ask and it can become known.
What you will find when investigating many of these closes are the same with a different name given by others.The majority of sales gurus call it thier own name to make it their own close and identity.

The presentation paper close I mentioned above is a method that I designed for our b2c. It combines some of the different closes. This close definitely bypasses objections as it explains on paper to the client pricing ,benefits and value. This close also allows for an explanation given on the individual sales that make the whole sale. It is wonderful for gaining additional sales and presenting them to the client without chaos and confusion.
Soon it will be in a published book ,once published I will post it in the site.Using illustrations and how to use the close.

The other closes usually fit the name either or close is a close that give two options.monday or wednesday delivery, do you want that in chrome or brass.In your case do you want the twelve month or twenty-four month disability.

If each of us that have ten clsoes decided to give an explanatuoin of them our forum thread would be extremely long. - by rich34232
What you will find when investigating many of these closes are the same with a different name given by others.The majority of sales gurus call it thier own name to make it their own close and identity.
Who are you referring to? I'm fairly well informed in that area and I can think of only one "guru" who coined a term to describe a "close." It was Tom Hopkins with "alternate advance close" which years ago was referred to as the choice of the double positive.

I'm curious who else did that.

Your presentation paper close sounds similar to a process that was mandatory for a large direct selling organization that I once was a training manager in. We found it difficult to teach, but the top producers had mastered it. Of course that's the norm. - by Ace Coldiron
I stated the majority of sales gurus put thier own name to the close. If you look at Zig Ziglar,Brian Tracy and Tom Hopkins you will find many of the closings they describe are thee xact same with different names. I did not pick one out to prove a statement as being wrong. However I did not state that all closes were copied and a different title to the closings.

The example you gave you named two different names to that close which proves my point that different names are given to the exact same close. by different professionals.You have proven my point and I thank you for helping me prove my statement.

The closing I have designed is an easy close to learn and implement. It helps the sales person who fears the add on sale and is a great tool for all sales professional.The hardest part of this particular close is convincing the sales professional to change thirr process and adapt to this close.This is a normal problem with most sales professionals they do not like change and it takes time to convince them to change.However when I use this close to show them why change is great they can read,see and experience how this close really enhances thier chance of receiving the ownership exchange.They see it in the different ways that people learn.

What is great with all closes they are a combination of each other and normally work well with each other.Some work better than others with one another . Such as the silent close and just ask close they work well with all of the other closes. - by rich34232
Rich, I was questioning the accuracy of your statement:

"The majority of sales gurus call it thier [sic] own name to make it their own close and identity."

You were unable to provide an example . So I still question the accuracy. If somehow I proved your point in your mind, I guess that's a good thing. - by Ace Coldiron
"Tom Hopkins with "alternate advance close" which years ago was referred to as the choice of the double positive." Your own words.

This does not prove my point that sales gurus put thier own spin name to a close???If this does not prove the point I have no idea what you want from me. - by rich34232
It just seems to me, from reading the previous replies, that this has turned into the Top Ten Titles Of Closes, Not the Actual Closes Themselves.

It would be plenty useful, if each individual one was laid out in specific detail as each poster has learned them.

I know for sure, I would appreciate it. thmbp2;

Ed - by Ed The Roofer
The porch light close is by far my most successful close in the bag. - by Mr. Mike
My favorite closing action:

"Do you want to go ahead and get it?" (of course, can be adjusted for a myriad of sales situations).

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
The assumption close: "So how are you wanting to pay for this?" then list the payment plans. - by ttdub
I've complained about this before, and if this is to be a closed club, that's fine too, but I asked for an example of one of these closes and wind up seeing a dozen more that are really meaningless to me.

So, from the standpoint of helpfulness, for me... this is a top ten waste of time.
This is scary! I'm agreeing with you! If we all knew what these closes were, I'd say super. As of right now, they are just words. - by Cowman
You knows that out here on the islands, that emerald lilypad situated as the most remote archipelago in the Pacific, there are activity that go on in the rainforests visible only by the orange/white glow of streaming fingers of lava that race towards the relentless occilations of the sea as it cascades upon the newformed cliffs thus starting its timeless erosion even as the magma cools, that through proper offering to the Goddess Pele or her young mischievious suitor, Kamapua'a, can bring about even the most illodgical of manifestation..... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
It just seems to me, from reading the previous replies, that this has turned into the Top Ten Titles Of Closes, Not the Actual Closes Themselves.

It would be plenty useful, if each individual one was laid out in specific detail as each poster has learned them.

I know for sure, I would appreciate it. thmbp2;

Ed
My thoughts exactly. - by Cowman
My thoughts exactly.
Cowman, what do you believe "closing" IS? It would be perhaps more useful to get your perspective as one who lists himself as a novice, as opposed to those who fall into the other two categories, i.e., Advanced or Practiced Novice.

If, for instance, you view closing as something that would be out of synch with the topic in general, that discovery might prove to be a defining moment in your career.

As an Advanced, with a very high conversion rate, I see little value in most of the aforementioned bulleted lists of "top" closes. Tell us your perspective. As a relative beginner you have an advantage. - by Ace Coldiron
The assumption close: "So how are you wanting to pay for this?" then list the payment plans.
Might be interesting to test that example with two popularly accepted platitudes of selling.

First, "closing", as an "event" if one believes it is, is almost always conceived as effective if we reduce a major decision to a minor one. Putting the decision of choice of "payment plan" on the prospect's shoulders as an "assumptive close" isn't necessarily a minor decision and could stall the proceedings.

Second--to ask the question "So how do you want to pay for this?" and continue talking by stating a list of options dilutes the question and really is no close at all--it's simply providing information which should have been done beforehand.

The key to using these closing techniques (if you are going to use them) is twofold. First--understand them--then do them right. - by Ace Coldiron
Cowman, what do you believe "closing" IS? It would be perhaps more useful to get your perspective as one who lists himself as a novice, as opposed to those who fall into the other two categories, i.e., Advanced or Practiced Novice.

If, for instance, you view closing as something that would be out of synch with the topic in general, that discovery might prove to be a defining moment in your career.

As an Advanced, with a very high conversion rate, I see little value in most of the aforementioned bulleted lists of "top" closes. Tell us your perspective. As a relative beginner you have an advantage.
Huh? Gee, I dunno!shds;

My limited experience in closing is that I don't have a certain way.

As for me, although the the assumptive close is what was taught, it's not my favorite. It's almost an insult to the customer because he/she knows beyond a doubt what is going on. I very much dislike it and feel very uncomfortable using it.

If I look in a book I like the Ben Franklin close best. It allows reinforcement of the benefits and puts it in front of the customer for questions or further talking.

In practice, I tell the customer what I have, answer questions, and ask for the sale. I do so in the most honest and straight forward way that I can. In a nutshell, we both know I am a salesman but I still try to come off as being a person who shows the product and then the customer decides whether or not to buy.

So far, so good! - by Cowman
Huh? Gee, I dunno!shds;

My limited experience in closing is that I don't have a certain way.

As for me, although the the assumptive close is what was taught, it's not my favorite. It's almost an insult to the customer because he/she knows beyond a doubt what is going on. I very much dislike it and feel very uncomfortable using it.

If I look in a book I like the Ben Franklin close best. It allows reinforcement of the benefits and puts it in front of the customer for questions or further talking.

In practice, I tell the customer what I have, answer questions, and ask for the sale. I do so in the most honest and straight forward way that I can. In a nutshell, we both know I am a salesman but I still try to come off as being a person who shows the product and then the customer decides whether or not to buy.

So far, so good!
It's not that I disagree with any of this as I'm not qualified to comment, but I think I'd like to offer an alternative approach to consider.

First I'd like to proffer the suggestion that questioning your client prodigiously is appropriate to the endeavor of solving needs, offering new services, or presenting new ideas.

Relentless questioning of an appropriate nature will uncover a sale if one is in fact there. Some Sage said something to the effect that you can tell him something and not be able to sell him something, paraphrased as "telling aint selling". Dale Carnegie preached the mantra that no-one wants to listen to you, but that an accomplished listener is a great conversationalist. Bettger was told by a friend that he talked too much. Bettger stopped talking, started asking questions and then listened and sold more.

Action selling preaches proper questioning... "ask the best questions". Asking questions that seek to find out what the client does for a living, who his competition is, how does he get along now without your product, what and how he uses your competions product, if that is the case, and maybe how do others use your or your competitions products.

Ultimately what is it your company or you can do for your client... and it all comes from questioning... who, what, when, where, how and "what else"... has been pounded into me too.

I'm convinced that when you find out what someone does, you can find out what they need and if you can provide either a solution, a remedy, or a new idea.

Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Huh? Gee, I dunno!shds;
........
So far, so good!
Tell us what that last sentence means. - by Ace Coldiron
Tell us what that last sentence means.
It means: so far, so good! - by Cowman
It means: so far, so good!
I wasn't looking for a sarcastic answer which is not in the spirit of constructive discussion on this forum.

"So far-so good" could be easily construed as a measurement of results which is an important factor in our profession. I was simply asking for clarification which is common in these discussions--and helpful. - by Ace Coldiron
I wasn't looking for a sarcastic answer which is not in the spirit of constructive discussion on this forum.

"So far-so good" could be easily construed as a measurement of results which is an important factor in our profession. I was simply asking for clarification which is common in these discussions--and helpful.
I was yanking your rope a bit! Nothing more, nothing less. Discussion is good and fine. Having a bit of fun is very OK too. I hope so anyway! ;bg

Ya know, my best description is that things are going OK! The actual # of sales have been not been super but they have been at least average or above average when compared to the entire sales crew. I'm the only one there who has never sold before. So, things are going OK.

Now is a time for learning, getting a customer base and selling a few systems here and there. I'm not yet making enough money that I can make a living off of this but I never expected the money to start flowing in by the bucketloads.

Eh, not quite what you wanted, huh? I am missing the boat here a bit. I told you my basic beginning philosophy. I've told you how things are starting out. Tell me exactly what you are looking for and I'll try to provide a bit more satisfactory answer for you. - by Cowman
Tell me exactly what you are looking for and I'll try to provide a bit more satisfactory answer for you.
Clarification which you have now provided. You are correct in my opinion with regard to avoiding the transparent approach. - by Ace Coldiron
Hmmm, not sure I'm following the value of a list of top 10 sales closes unless you are listing the top 10 reasons someone won't buy from you.

If you've heard a close enough times to list it as one of the top 10 so have your prospects.

That means when you try to use it on a prospect they already have a conditioned response for overcoming that close.

Plus you've just triggered their defenses.

And that means you're going to have to work just that much harder to get back to neutral with that prospect so you have even a slim chance of being able to share your ideas with them.

I'd have to say I'm on the same page as Ace on this onethmbp2; - by ccIowa
The 'close' is that tiny part of the sales process where we assist the potential customer to step over the line.

They should already be there actually but using a few words simply formalises the situation.

It is no big deal (nor should it be) it is simply a confirmation of what both parties should have arrived at anyway....which is agreememnt to go ahead.

It is unfortunately seen as the magic pill that overweight people look for. The 'cure all', the '10 never fail closes' that gets punted around as a solution to all the woes of the saleperson.

If we have interacted with a potential customer in the correct way then they will stepped along the route through the minefield holding our hand (metaphorically) they trust us, they are happy with the place we have lead them to . . . so it's only natural they they say 'yes' when we ask 'shall we . . . . '

I only know one close. The words change a little depending on the situation.

It usually sounds a bit like this:

OK Fred...so based on everything we've said....
Would you like to.....?
Can I.....?
Shall we.....?
Would you like one of these?
Should I put your name down as a customer?

Plus at least 20 others I can think of.

'The Close' is a dreadful concept. Misunderstood by many and seen as the ultimate weapon by the inexperienced.

Truth is.....eventually.....you don't really need one. - by helisell
It's amazing I've lasted this long.
hahaha... this made me laugh. I feel the same way. Actually one of the reasons why I never learned good closes (at school) is because they lost me in the names. The few names I remember are:

Puppy dog close
Assumptive close

That's it... I just basically look at how it's done and then do it and forget about what the close is called... it confuses me too much.

Now I'm gonna go back and see if I can learn any more good closes!! - by Andrea
From my experience, closing is not an event. It is not about saying a well rehearsed statement to compel the prospect to say "Yes." In my opinion closing is the consummation of the sale. Therefore, it cannot be viewed in isolation. Simply put, there is no one magic close and therefore listing some names of some common, generic, one size fits all closes is interesting to sales geeks like me, but not very helpful to anyone who desires to impact their sales production.

I would even go so far as to say that learning sales closes in isolation of the rest of the sale, which is how they are usually taught, is counterproductive because it teaches sales people that some magical phrase that they utter will influence the prospect to such an extent that he will say "Yes." Such thinking is juvenile at best and disruptive at worst. - by Harold
From my experience, closing is not an event. It is not about saying a well rehearsed statement to compel the prospect to say "Yes." In my opinion closing is the consummation of the sale. Therefore, it cannot be viewed in isolation. Simply put, there is no one magic close and therefore listing some names of some common, generic, one size fits all closes is interesting to sales geeks like me, but not very helpful to anyone who desires to impact their sales production.

I would even go so far as to say that learning sales closes in isolation of the rest of the sale, which is how they are usually taught, is counterproductive because it teaches sales people that some magical phrase that they utter will influence the prospect to such an extent that he will say "Yes." Such thinking is juvenile at best and disruptive at worst.
I am very much agreement with your post. I define closing as a progression of consent which is counter to the notion that it is an event.

The isolation, as you put it, of closing from the rest of the process is a notion that is derived from support systems for ineffective selling based on highly fictional models. - by Ace Coldiron
It's refreshing to note that the tone of this thread is moving away from the absurd lists of crappy "killer closes".

The following are a couple of quotations, first from Mark Twain, American thinker and humorist and this quote has been utilised by Michael Hewitt-Gleeson in his book "WOMBAT selling" which can be downloaded in it's entirety absolutely FREE from his website. The second quote is from the book ...

‘I am aware when even the brightest mind in our world
has been trained up from childhood in a superstition of
any kind, it will never be possible for that mind, in its
maturity, to examine sincerely, dispassionately, and
conscientiously any evidence or any circumstance
which shall seem to cast a doubt upon the validity of
that superstition.’
Mark Twain

"In reality, this medieval dogma of ‘closing the sale’ is a
nonsense that is taught to salespeople as novices and
accepted by them as a sacred belief – and unfortunately,
it seems very few challenge that belief ever again. Like
an information virus that gets into their brains, ‘closing
the sale’ influences young salespeople’s behaviour and
dominates their sales activities. The costly failure of this
‘close-the-sale’ strategy is well documented and nothing
has so damaged the image of the sales profession than
this selling disease. It’s difficult to see how young
salespeople could be misled more than to be given the
impression that their job is to ‘close the sale".
Michael Hewitt-Gleeson

[Promotional link removed by Moderator] - by Tony1905
Tony, that's not a post---it's a WAKE UP CALL!! - by Ace Coldiron
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.