Home > Consumer Behavior > The topic of "Interest" in personal selling?

The topic of "Interest" in personal selling?

Many sales book and discussions bring up the topic of customer "Interest" (a sense of concern with and curiosity about someone or something). Even Marketing addresses "Interest" and includes it in the AIDA acronym. In your opinion, is the topic of "Interest" important in personal selling? - by Community Mailbox
Interested prospects seldom buy. They just waste your time, resources, and emotional stamina.

If and when they do buy, about 5 percent buy from the salesperson who educated them. - by JacquesWerth
My take on this is somewhat different.

First, to address Jacques' post. "I'm interested" I believe to be a result that would have the lack of value that Jacques describes.

That is one specific context with which to examine the topic.

The AIDA construct (I prefer AIDCA, adding Conviction) uses "Interest" in a much different context. It views Interest as a progression of Attention. Desire (D) is then uncovered, not created as popularly taught. This coincides with the belief, my own and others', that people buy what they WANT (desire--the verb).

In short, a stated Interest by a prospect will not often land a sale. Interest as part of an attention-expanding sales progression is, however, a good thing.

Context, and the ability to differentiate between the variants of context, are extremely important in learning. - by Gary A Boye
Gary - I too believe that AIDCA, the traditional Buying Decision model, is the way most people approach important purchases. However, the masses of easily available information about virtually every product or service has changed the role of the salesperson.

Top producers realize that high probability prospects have already worked their way through Attention, Interest and Desire. Thus, the best prospects are ready, willing, and able to move to Conviction and Action.

There's a new world of selling out there. - by JacquesWerth

Top producers realize that high probability prospects have already worked their way through Attention, Interest and Desire. Thus, the best prospects are ready, willing, and able to move to Conviction and Action.
I agree, Jacques. Someone might say "Well what about a product and service that is totally new?"

But how many people today are selling something that truly fits that description? Pads, i.e., IPads and Droids such as Samsung's are hot this holiday season. Prospective buyers are well beyond the Attention, Interest, and Desire stages.

Again, I use Interest in a progression context, not as a static, neutral state (or for that matter, a way of saying "no.") - by Gary A Boye
In this Era, most people believe that almost anything is possible.

Even with a product or service that is totally new, virtually every product and service can be described by it's functions and properties - in less than 20 seconds. - by JacquesWerth
Hi folks,

This is my first post and so maybe im reading it incorrectly but isnt interest one of the fundamental signs that if escalated correctly will end in a Sale?

If not escalated correctly it may stay as interest or get dropped when overtaken by something new. - by Hoodu
Hi folks,

This is my first post and so maybe I'm reading it incorrectly but isn't interest one of the fundamental signs that, if escalated correctly, will end in a Sale?

If not escalated correctly it may stay as interest or get dropped when overtaken by something new.
It's a fair question, Hoodu. My answer, in response to how you worded it, would be no.

However, if you were to ask whether I would rather work with an interested prospect rather than a disinterested prospect, the answer would be obvious.

A fundamental sign that, if "escalated correctly", will end in a sale would be if you have determined that the prospect WANTS what you have to offer, providing the prospect is ready, willing, and able to buy.

It's important in this discussion to point out that expression of interest is not synonymous with authentic interest. So when a prospect says, "I'm interested.", that's not a buying signal. In fact, it's often a ploy to neutralize any leverage of the seller which the prospect perceives or feels. - by Gary A Boye
Sorry I dont want to be a party pooper but I would disagree with your statement that "I'm interested.", that's not a buying signal ?

Your next statement {In fact, it's often a ploy to neutralize any leverage of the seller which the prospect perceives or feels.}Seems to me to be a handy excuse to not actually get the Sale ?

Tell me what you think ? - by Hoodu
Sorry I dont want to be a party pooper but I would disagree with your statement that "I'm interested.", that's not a buying signal ?

Your next statement {In fact, it's often a ploy to neutralize any leverage of the seller which the prospect perceives or feels.}Seems to me to be a handy excuse to not actually get the Sale ?

Tell me what you think ?
No need to apologize. Your view is probably shared by a majority. Which brings up a question I'll pose to you. How do you think the majority does in sales as compared to the tops in their field?

Here's one more question. What do you think a buying signal is?

Most of the top producers in sales would recognize an ownership question as a buying signal.

As far as your comment about "excuses" goes, I can't relate. - by Gary A Boye
Sorry I dont want to be a party pooper but I would disagree with your statement that "I'm interested.", that's not a buying signal ?

Your next statement {In fact, it's often a ploy to neutralize any leverage of the seller which the prospect perceives or feels.}Seems to me to be a handy excuse to not actually get the Sale ?
What type of prospect would you rather spend your time, effort, resources, and emotional stamina on? Would it be:
1. An "interested" prospect?
2. Someone who is ready, willing, and able to buy?

Top producers are expert prospectors. They only spend their time with No. 2, above.

When interested prospects buy, it's seldom from the salesperson who escalated their interest. They usually buy from the next salesperson they meet. - by JacquesWerth
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