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Buyers buy only when...

How would you complete this sentence; Buyers buy only when... - by Community Mailbox
Buyers buy only when they reach their own specific level of comfort with the decision to buy.

Because of how the topic's question was worded (i.e. "only"), I personally could not entertain any other answer to the question as being correct. The Confidence factor in selling is IMMENSE. - by Ace Coldiron
Buyers buy only when ready. When want, need, use, and afford is in place the client is ready to own. This does not guarantee that they own from me however they will own from someone and I must drive the need to own from me and the want to own from me. - by rich34232
Buyers only buy when the upside gain outweighs the downside risk and all questions and concerns have been resolved to their satisfaction. - by Seth
Buyers only buy when the upside gain outweighs the downside risk and all questions and concerns have been resolved to their satisfaction.
And in the case of a carton of cigarettes?

OK--perhaps an unfair example of a nasty consumable commodity. But your statement contradicts the popular view that buyers buy emotionally and justify rationally. It also doesn't fit the concept of process driven buyers vs. task driven buyers. Task driven buyers seldom, as acts of volition, engage in the analysis that you propose. - by Ace Coldiron
And in the case of a carton of cigarettes?

OK--perhaps an unfair example of a nasty consumable commodity. But your statement contradicts the popular view that buyers buy emotionally and justify rationally. It also doesn't fit the concept of process driven buyers vs. task driven buyers. Task driven buyers seldom, as acts of volition, engage in the analysis that you propose.
How does that not apply to cigarettes? - by Seth
Buyers buy only when ready. When want, need, use, and afford is in place the client is ready to own. This does not guarantee that they own from me however they will own from someone and I must drive the need to own from me and the want to own from me.
It was about buying--not ready to "own".

A person can be ready, but not willing to buy. Currently the offer is on the table for some new office space for one of my businesses. I'm ready to move and ready for the new space, but I'm not comfortable with the decision yet. If tomorrow when I meet with the property owner, I am comfortable--THEN I'll write the check. You really cannot eliminate the WILLING, from ready, willing, and able. My willingness comes from my comfort level--the same thing that I have observed from many thousands of sales I have consumated. I draw my opinions, beliefs, and contributions to this forum from what I have observed in real life--not lists or stuff that sounds good on the surface. I encourage others--particulary newbies with fresh minds to do the same. - by Ace Coldiron
How does that not apply to cigarettes?
Well, Seth, it certainly does, but it's a tactical and radical example and I felt apologetic about it. I try and avoid that in these discussions. BUT...yes it applies.

BTW, I can tell you firsthand that the risks of smoking truly outweight ANYTHING about the "advantages". - by Ace Coldiron
But your statement contradicts the popular view that buyers buy emotionally and justify rationally. It also doesn't fit the concept of process driven buyers vs. task driven buyers. Task driven buyers seldom, as acts of volition, engage in the analysis that you propose.
Weighing the upside gain against the downside risk can be emotional and rational. The same for resolving concerns. The decision process can happen quickly for both the process driven and the task driven buyer so there doesn't have to be a conflict. - by Seth
BTW, I can tell you firsthand that the risks of smoking truly outweight ANYTHING about the "advantages".
Tell that to a smoker with a habit and see if they quit smoking. - by Seth
Weighing the upside gain against the downside risk can be emotional and rational. The same for resolving concerns. The decision process can happen quickly for both the process driven and the task driven buyer so there doesn't have to be a conflict.
The decision RARELY happens quickly for the process driven buyer.

"all questions and concerns have been resolved to their satisfaction" implies a rational process, Seth. I did not say a "correct" process, or one devoid of emotion.

In any event, whether through a rational, emotional, or hybrid of both in the process, the buyer will buy when he/she feels comfortable in doing so.

Keep in mind we're talking about creative selling situations. I have never yet felt comfortable spending money on a cystoscopy. - by Ace Coldiron
The decision process RARELY happens quickly for the process driven buyer.
Keep in mind we're talking about creative selling situations. I have never yet felt comfortable spending money on a cystoscopy.
I think it depends on the type of purchase decision. Is it a minor new purchase, a major repurchase or something in between? - by Seth
Tell that to a smoker with a habit and see if they quit smoking.
It can be seen now why I felt remorse for providing that example. I don't know what your point is, but let's leave it alone.

If you disagree with my original statement as a reply to this topic--say so. I've already said that I disagree with yours. But I do hope that people who come to SalesPractice to learn will take my post very seriously. If not, at least I've done my part. - by Ace Coldiron
Ace....

I liked your answer and the rationale for it... especially when you delineated the "only" premise.

However, assuming your answer is correct, it would be the ONLY correct answer wouldn't it? If I'm correct with that assumption, then the thread would be over in only one answer... and how much fun would that be? msnwnk;

Much Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Ace.... There is something wrong with the site... I can't move my curser with my mouse.. I get only the hand dealywho...

But to your question/answer. I liked your answer and the rationale for it... especiall when you delineated the "only" premise.

However, assuming your answer is correct, it would be the ONLY correct answer wouldn't it? If I'm correct with that assumption, then the thread would be over in only one answer... and how much fun would that be? msnwnk;

Much Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg
I'm laughing, Tom. YES..I believe that my answer is the ONLY corrrect answer and you are correct with that assumption.

How much fun? It's a lot of fun for people who think a post is an audition. It's a Catch-22 for me because I will continue to post ONLY what I know from experience and my success in selling.

My guess is that Jeff might believe that the thread would be over. Perhaps he will show mercy and close it. - by Ace Coldiron
It can be seen now why I felt remorse for providing that example.
Please feel no remorse, please do not feel bad
Until one has quit smoking, they know not that they're mad
Habits are sometimes good, and many times they're bad
Habits can be heartwarming, and sometimes make you sad

But smoking is an evil, that's cool and makes you tough
But if one keeps on smoking, their future will be rough
I say this oh self righteous, for see that I'm reformed
The only more self righteous have in brothels once performed

shds; ;bg - by rattus58
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