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Qualifying questions: Manipulation?

Here's my main question, I'm happy that there's a forum of strong sales people here who can help each other out and share opinions.

Qualifying questions, Are they considered a form of manipulation? What's your take on them?
Please be honest, there are many sales people and many have different morals, what do you think about this, please answer after reading my next paragraph.

Qualifying questions are designed to determine whether or not your prospect can use your product and has a need for your product is it not? Well in theory I find that's a plausible reason, but then again, aside from the basic questions, aren't all your questions designed to lead you to "well we've got a product for you, sir!"

Essentially, are your questions designed to lead anybody who is ABLE to buy your product to buy your product?
Also
Do you feel bad about your prospects expecting you to say "great! My product will benefit you!" regardless of answers?

I believe most salespeople will say that they lead their prospects to the idea that their product will benefit them regardless of whether they think it actually will since it ups the chances of hitting another sale. - by DrPattyCakes
Personally I totally.... READ THAT TOTALLY reject your thesis that most sales people will " say that they lead their prospects to the idea that their product will benefit them regardless of whether they think it actually will since it ups the chances of hitting another sale."

I'm reserving my OPINION of your sales practices by virtue of this statement, but sales people who would deliberately sell people something that they know won't work, help, or whatever, in MY OPINION are defrauding their victims. - by rattus58
I agree with you there, but then again, I saw that a percentage of salespeople in my office sway towards the opinion that not telling the truth won't necessarily hurt them under the condition that they'll like the product once they have it, I'm going to play devil's advocate here even though I disagree with even white lying, some items are worth a higher value to some than others so why not charge them more? and again, what is the difference to you bought an item because you were told the item is promotional when in reality it wasn't?

One practical way of explain it is, if you could sell an item for 1500 dollars OR 1000 dollars based on your choice or risk involved in the win/loss of the sale, what do you do?
Charge 1500? charge 1000? or maybe 1250?

Also If you knew your prospect would not buy an item, lets say a chocolate bar for $1.00 unless he was under the impression that 1.00 is a promotional price, would you say it's a promotional price? After all, he WILL enjoy it just as much

Moral questions.

P.S. I tell the truth and the whole truth in my sales, infact, I found that being very blunt about the price is more effective to me. - by DrPattyCakes
As corny as it sounds "honesty is the best policy" Sales people who manipulate the facts will soon be discovered. It is those people who give the rest of the world a shiver, when they think about sales.

Professional sales people are honorable, not manipulative they are not in this business for the quick buck. We all want to earn a great living, but those "fast buck" sales people hopefully will be gone as quickly as they come. - by The Dynamic Business
How do you then explain the take away close?
When in fact the item will be restocked in a week, two weeks or whenever.
or we are expecting a price increase. Of course we all expect a price increase at one time or another.

I am not a fan of this close, some are highly effective with this close. Does that make them unethical? - by rich34232
Somehow the link has been made between qualifying questions and morality and honesty and ethics and manipulation.

Qualifying questions are not manipulative, nor are they immoral, dishonest or unethical, imo.


Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
How do you then explain the take away close?
When in fact the item will be restocked in a week, two weeks or whenever.
or we are expecting a price increase. Of course we all expect a price increase at one time or another.

I am not a fan of this close, some are highly effective with this close. Does that make them unethical?
YES.... it does make them unethical. If you have three yellow submarines in the back lot and tell someone that this is the last one or similar relationships and you in fact use that to motivate them to action... you are in my OPINION UNETHICAL.

On the other hand telling someone do it now or you may not qualify healthwise later I don't consider out of context... because it happened to me.

So yes....

Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
I think it's important to decide if this thread is about (1) qualifying questions; or (2) closing or (3) ethics. - by Skip Anderson
Asking good qualifying questions is part of good selling. I don't see where a discussion of manipulation in that context is related or relevant. Neither do I see the relevance of the "take away close" regarding a discussion on qualifying. - by Ace Coldiron
Asking good qualifying questions is part of good selling. I don't see where a discussion of manipulation in that context is related or relevant. Neither do I see the relevance of the "take away close" regarding a discussion on qualifying.
Hi,

Thanks very much for this comment. It help me to think about my ideals.

Tks again and pls keep posting. - by jerryvn01
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