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Cold call questions

The company sold has been in the pcb business for many years. In order to increase sales the company has decided to add a new product line. I have technical and sales experience with the new product line and I was hired to support and manage the sales team.

Some have embraced the new product line, but most are a bit intimidated or just don't want to go outside their comfort level.

Our products can be sold through purchasing and engineering. I want to give them two or three general questions for each. My thought is with the current economy, purchasers will be most interested in cost reductions. And my questions should be in regards to the opportunity to save money.

Engineering questions should be about issues or concerns with the products application/use.

Any thoughts or ideas? Keep in mind, the salesforce at this point has very little technical knowledge of the product.

Thanks,
DD - by derek dixon
If you sell only on saving money you will have a short lived sales cycle. These types of customers will jump ship as soon as someone else comes along with a better price.

What you really need to sell is the value of your product and the service that your company provides. People are willing to spend more money as long as the product value is there.

Another tactic that you should use is a relationship based sales model. Your sales staff need to set themselves apart from all of the other companies that prospect your clients several times a day. Get to know your clients and don't be affraid to get a little personal with them. They will feel more comfortable dealing with your sales staff and will less likely jump ship. With a good relationship they will also be more inclined to give you the price range that your competition is quoting them.

You stated it yourself... "or just don't want to go outside their comfort level". Most purchasers function the same way. You would be far better off to go with that angle instead of going in with price alone. - by salesfist
If you sell only on saving money you will have a short lived sales cycle. These types of customers will jump ship as soon as someone else comes along with a better price.

What you really need to sell is the value of your product and the service that your company provides. People are willing to spend more money as long as the product value is there.

Another tactic that you should use is a relationship based sales model. Your sales staff need to set themselves apart from all of the other companies that prospect your clients several times a day. Get to know your clients and don't be affraid to get a little personal with them. They will feel more comfortable dealing with your sales staff and will less likely jump ship. With a good relationship they will also be more inclined to give you the price range that your competition is quoting them.

You stated it yourself... "or just don't want to go outside their comfort level". Most purchasers function the same way. You would be far better off to go with that angle instead of going in with price alone.
Price or cost?

Term insurance is price comparing.
Whole life it is cost.

Are you concerned about price or are you really concerned about cost.

This is one way I'd differentiate price versus cost. Zig Ziglar, I believe "Would you agree, that as a practical matter, a product is worth what it can do for you and not what you have to pay for it?"

Zig again, I think (notes), "It's easier to explain price just once than to have to apologize for poor quality or service forever!" and lastly... not sure who said this, probably ziglar again... "Wouldn't you agree that it's better to pay a little more than you expected than a little less than you should?"

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
The company sold has been in the pcb business for many years. In order to increase sales the company has decided to add a new product line. I have technical and sales experience with the new product line and I was hired to support and manage the sales team.

Some have embraced the new product line, but most are a bit intimidated or just don't want to go outside their comfort level.

Our products can be sold through purchasing and engineering. I want to give them two or three general questions for each. My thought is with the current economy, purchasers will be most interested in cost reductions. And my questions should be in regards to the opportunity to save money.

Engineering questions should be about issues or concerns with the products application/use.

Any thoughts or ideas? Keep in mind, the salesforce at this point has very little technical knowledge of the product.

Thanks,
DD
Derek...

Your sales force is "a bit intimidated or just don't want to go outside their comfort level" BECAUSE "the salesforce at this point has very little technical knowledge of the product."

I can tell you this - NO sales person wants to go out there and sell a product they know little about. They do not want to go out there and look like fools!!! Best way to get them selling is to increase their training. #1 thing to do. Just my opinion. - by Andrea
Price or cost?

Term insurance is price comparing.
Whole life it is cost.

Are you concerned about price or are you really concerned about cost.

This is one way I'd differentiate price versus cost. Zig Ziglar, I believe "Would you agree, that as a practical matter, a product is worth what it can do for you and not what you have to pay for it?"

Zig again, I think (notes), "It's easier to explain price just once than to have to apologize for poor quality or service forever!" and lastly... not sure who said this, probably ziglar again... "Wouldn't you agree that it's better to pay a little more than you expected than a little less than you should?"

Aloha... :cool:
This was excellent! Thanks a bunch for the tips, I ne ver looked at it that way. I will try this today.
Mary - by mlgage
Derek, the thread so far has pounded the concern about fixating on "price". In my experience this topic comes after the close where possible.

I'd much rather spend time developing the relationship on such topics as:
1. when you've changed suppliers in the past:
a) what caused you to part company?
b) what characteristics make-up the perfect supplier?
2. if cost weren't an issue, what would you have your supplier provide for you?
3. when you pay a premium for a certain product or service, how do you justify the perceived increment?

Regarding #2, I frequently frame this differently. For example, "if I handed you the pallette and the brush how would you paint the picture of your perfect supplier"?

As you can see, these sort of discussion points aren't fodder for success with the purchasing department. Your success rate improves dramatically when you're presenting farther up the food chain!

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
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