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Are you a sales dinosaur?

I think a sales dinosaur is anyone selling for a living whose sales practice hasn't evolved beyond pitching an offer to anyone who will listen.

What is a sales dinosaur to you? - by Seth
I think a sales dinosaur is anyone selling for a living whose sales practice hasn't evolved beyond pitching an offer to anyone who will listen.

What is a sales dinosaur to you?
You titled this topic "Are You a Sales Dinosaur?" Who is the "you" that you are referring to? Where does the term dinosaur fit into your description about "pitching"?

The base of understanding and experience varies from one person to the next, and ideally people grow. It serves no purpose, here or anywhere else, to label others in a particular stage of development with demeaning words like dinosaur--whatever the heck that is supposed to mean.

Take a tip from Tom Hopkins and label those that you think are below your level of expertise as Future Champions. - by Ace Coldiron
Dinosaurs were poorly prepared for the changing world. A sales dinosaur would similarly be poorly prepared for the changing world.

"Pitching" is an example of a sales technique that worked well at some point in the past but has lost its effectiveness do to changes in the sales environment. - by Seth
I would have to agree with Ace. I think this is an example of the sad state of affairs sales training is in. The trite rules. The self proclaimed sales experts give us their generic advice and we have become so used to it that we buy their books that after 200 pages tell us to "listen better." Pick up many sales books and you get shallow ideas that sound good with their catchy phrasing, but give no results. I have studied the major sales training systems, taken the classes, read the books, went to the seminars. Strategies but no tactics, methodologies with holes so big I could drive my truck through them.

When will we start asking better questions. Like how do prospects buy? What is their process? Why do prospects buy? QUestions like that would get us somewhere. They would improve us and our concept of the sales process. Ok, my rant is over. Hopefully it provides food for thought, and just so I give some value: "Build Rapport with your prospects, that is important. Get them to trust you." - There I just saved you $15 thmbp2; - by Harold
I would have to agree with Ace. I think this is an example of the sad state of affairs sales training is in. The trite rules. The self proclaimed sales experts give us their generic advice and we have become so used to it that we buy their books that after 200 pages tell us to "listen better." Pick up many sales books and you get shallow ideas that sound good with their catchy phrasing, but give no results. I have studied the major sales training systems, taken the classes, read the books, went to the seminars. Strategies but no tactics, methodologies with holes so big I could drive my truck through them.

When will we start asking better questions. Like how do prospects buy? What is their process? Why do prospects buy? QUestions like that would get us somewhere. They would improve us and our concept of the sales process. Ok, my rant is over. Hopefully it provides food for thought, and just so I give some value: "Build Rapport with your prospects, that is important. Get them to trust you." - There I just saved you $15 thmbp2;
Action Selling... Why don't you take a look at that?

Aloha.... :cool: - by rattus58
I am quite familiar with Action Selling. It is one of the better training systems, which is sort of a compliment. Although that is the equivalent of saying you are the least ugly girl in the room. However, it does not tell the why or psychology behind their steps of the sale. So you never become an expert in the sales process, you simply become an expert in Action Selling. But that being said it does offer some value and some of the visuals used to aid in learning are very helpful and aid in making the content easier to grasp and retain. - by Harold
Harold, at the request of the product manager of The Sales Board, a company that created Action Selling, I read and reviewed their latest book and posted the review on my blog. As a prerequisite, I read their original book, Action Selling.

My overall comments were positive, and I said that it "looked like selling" as it was written in the now popular parable and/or novelette form.

Your thoughts add a different and interesting perspective.

I agree that an understanding of the "whys" of a process is as important as the learning and practice of a process. It will vary from individual to individual, but I am drawn to the understanding part. However we often view favorably those things that we "learn" that we are already know about, and because of that, perhaps I did not see the void of expository comments about what goes behind their system. - by Ace Coldiron
I would have to agree with Ace. I think this is an example of the sad state of affairs sales training is in. The trite rules. The self proclaimed sales experts give us their generic advice and we have become so used to it that we buy their books that after 200 pages tell us to "listen better." Pick up many sales books and you get shallow ideas that sound good with their catchy phrasing, but give no results. I have studied the major sales training systems, taken the classes, read the books, went to the seminars. Strategies but no tactics, methodologies with holes so big I could drive my truck through them.

When will we start asking better questions. Like how do prospects buy? What is their process? Why do prospects buy? QUestions like that would get us somewhere. They would improve us and our concept of the sales process. Ok, my rant is over. Hopefully it provides food for thought, and just so I give some value: "Build Rapport with your prospects, that is important. Get them to trust you." - There I just saved you $15 thmbp2;
As a sales trainer, I'm sorry to hear you're so down on the entire