Home > Closing > What exactly does "Close" mean?

What exactly does "Close" mean?

"The term 'close' has been a catch-all for everything to do with finalizing a sale. The lack of specific terminology indicates the state of confusion because conflict surrounds the words Sold, Closed and Ask For The Order." - D. Forbes Ley

I see closing as the natural conclusion not the sales process itself, what about you? - by Seth
I see closing as the natural conclusion not the sales process itself, what about you?
I agree, but not in the form of an event or separate entity.

Closing in sales is a progression of consent. - by Ace Coldiron
I would agree as well; I will use a close with every presentation. If I don't there is NO chance of signing the account; but just because I use the close, does NOT mean I got the deal. ;co Ideally, I did, but I find the world far from perfect ;st - by lisamom
Correct lisamom.

If only we could get every salesperson to at least have a go at asking the customer to go ahead then a lot more would get sold.

It's ok to ask even if you are not very good at handling objections. Do it enough times and you'll get the hang of it. - by helisell
Closing: completing a transaction.

I agree that closing is best achieved by seeing it as a long process from the beginning of the contact with the prospect through the completion of the transaction.

BUT, we have to be careful, because making a phone call is not closing. Meeting with a prospect is not closing. Give a presentation is not closing. Getting the order IS closing. - by Skip Anderson
I agree, but not in the form of an event or separate entity.

Closing in sales is a progression of consent.
I'm with you on this.... We're expanding our orbit.... :)

Much Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
A close or a sale is the natural evolution of a proper presentation for a person that genuinely needs your product or service. - by Jim Klein
Closing in sales is a progression of consent.
I agree with what Skip said, "Closing: completing a transaction."

However

What I believe this is, is a 'trial close'. I've always used a trial close to weed out any expressed or unexpressed objections which may later hinder the sale. A trial close doesn't ask for a decision on the spot nor does it suggest you are asking for the business.

My most popular line would be;
"Based on what we've covered so far, what are your thoughts?"

At least at the end of the presentation, I'm not handling multiple objections... - by MrCharisma
Closing = Taking a check from a new or current client for a sale - and having the check clear! - by Dave Tear
I agree with, some days back I was reading an article on sale closing techniques and here is the link to that
changingminds.org/disciplines/sales/closing/closing_techniques.htm - by Team Building FL
I agree with what Skip said, "Closing: completing a transaction."



My most popular line would be;
"Based on what we've covered so far, what are your thoughts?"

At least at the end of the presentation, I'm not handling multiple objections...
That is a great line to use during the presentation, I like it! My question then would be, do you handle any objections on the spot or work the "solution" into the rest of your presentation them. If you are not trying to get a decision, it seems the wrong time to try to overcome an objection.

~Lisa - by lisamom
If you are closing a sale you are tying it together. It may not work the first time or even the 10th, but you keep doing it until it is done. What makes a sale complete? It is when you no longer need to close because the buyer has committed to the sale. You get the buyer to commit to small yeses and ultimately the final yes which is to buy. It is important to guage where your customer is in terms of mindset, remove obstacles through answering objections and to serve your client's needs. Asking for the sale can be direct or indirect. The sales professional must ask for the sale in order to facilitate its successful closure. - by Guru4sale
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