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Receptivity: Get it? Got it. Good!

When necessary in prospecting or selling how do you put your prospects into a receptive state of mind? - by Seth
I try to do this in the first phone call, ideally, in the first 30 seconds of our conversation. If they are not receptive, I am just another sales person or telemarketer. I have been working a lot lately on the beginning of my "script" when I cold-call prospecting for just this reason; I want to engage them right away or I have lost already. :un - by lisamom
Seth

I come from the door-to-door background. I try to look around the potential customer's house or porch, and make a comment on something that I notice. You could say anything such as, "you have a beuatiful home," or "nice basketball court. Ok, I will give you what I am trying to promote 50% off if you can beat me a foul shooting contest."

I know it may sound stupid, but it works for me around 50% of the time, which is very high percentage, It gets them laughing or makes them engage in conversation with you as if you are one of their friends. - by Jumpman
I don't think you "put them in a receptive state of mind," I think it's your ability to engage the prospect that allows the prospect to feel comfortable being receptive. Receptiveness comes from within the prospect, not externally from a salesperson, imo. But it's our responsibility to key in to our prospect...then, respectively follows naturally. - by Skip Anderson
I think most prospects are not in the most receptive state of mind when first encountering a salesperson (There guard is up.).

If the salesperson is to have any hope of making a sale she/he will not only have to engage the prospect in meaningful dialogue but the prospect will have to be receptive to the salesperson's ideas or suggestions. - by Seth
I think most prospects are not in the most receptive state of mind when first encountering a salesperson (There guard is up.).
I agree completely, Seth.

If the salesperson is to have any hope of making a sale she/he will not only have to engage the prospect in meaningful dialogue...
Totally agree there, too.

...but the prospect will have to be receptive to the salesperson's ideas or suggestions.
"Receptivity" is one of the results of adequate engagement along with appropriate trust, credibility, likability, and so on, in my opinion.

In other words, the better the salesperson, the more receptive the prospect will be.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
I think most prospects are not in the most receptive state of mind when first encountering a salesperson (There (sic) guard is up.).
That is not universally true. It depends very much on the nature of our work in sales. A large part of my prospect base comes from word-of-mouth and unsolicited referrals. My selling process is also largely consultative. I would classify most of my prospects as receptive.

Much depends on the lead generation and/or source of lead. In my other company, for instance, we use a direct mail and phone follow-up system. The receptivity is naturally on a lower scale. However, we are very well represented, and Skip's words hold true when he said "...the better the salesperson, the more receptive the prospect will be." My partner is extraordinary in that regard. - by Ace Coldiron
"Receptivity" is one of the results of adequate engagement along with appropriate trust, credibility, likability, and so on, in my opinion.

In other words, the better the salesperson, the more receptive the prospect will be.
I think they key to receptivity is WANT. I could like you, trust you, respect you, etc. but if we're talking about me buying the meaningful dialogue had better be about something I WANT or I won't be receptive to your ideas or suggestions. - by Seth
I think they key to receptivity is WANT. I could like you, trust you, respect you, etc. but if we're talking about me buying the meaningful dialogue had better be about something I WANT or I won't be receptive to your ideas or suggestions.
Nobody should be selling to somebody who doesn't have a want, right? Prospecting is a different matter, though. I think those are two very different scenarios.

So Seth, answer your own question:

In prospecting, how do you put your prospects in a "receptive state of mind?"

In selling, how do you put your prospects in a "receptive state of mind?" - by Skip Anderson
So Seth, answer your own question:

In prospecting, how do you put your prospects in a "receptive state of mind?"

In selling, how do you put your prospects in a "receptive state of mind?"
Human nature doesn't change based on the activity you are engaged in - selling, prospecting, etc.

Your prospects WILL be receptive when they believe you have something they want or something that will help them get what they want. That's human nature. - by Seth
Human nature doesn't change based on the activity you are engaged in - selling, prospecting, etc.

Your prospects WILL be receptive when they believe you have something they want or something that will help them get what they want. That's human nature.
Seth, what if they don't believe you have something they want or somethng that will help them get what they want?

So Seth, answer your own question: "How do you put prospects in a "receptive state of mind?" - by Skip Anderson
Seth, what if they don't believe you have something they want or somethng that will help them get what they want?
If that was the case I do not think you would not be working with a receptive audience.

So Seth, answer your own question: "How do you put prospects in a "receptive state of mind?"
As Dale Carnegie once put it, "Talk in terms of the other person's interests." - by Seth

If that was the case I do not think you would not be working with a receptive audience.

As Dale Carnegie once put it, "Talk in terms of the other person's interests."
First I think you must use my proofreader. Did you actually mean "If that was the case I do not think you would be working with a receptive audience"?

Exactly how did Dale Carnegie mean "Talk in terms of the other person's interests"? I can vaguely remember some grand industrial choices Carnegie helped during his life as an industrialist and philanthropist and much of the time his efforts were to move millions into good works. How, in YOUR opinion, does his teachings help the typical salesman in MORE depth?

Aloha..... - by rattus58
I can vaguely remember some grand industrial choices Carnegie helped during his life as an industrialist and philanthropist and much of the time his efforts were to move millions into good works. How, in YOUR opinion, does his teachings help the typical salesman in MORE depth?

Aloha.....
I think, Tom, you might be confusing Dale Carnegie with Andrew Carnegie. Your point is well taken though. "In depth" works for me too. - by Ace Coldiron
I'm going back to bed.......

Second... where do I send my proofs... I'm convinced now.... :)

Much Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
I'm going back to bed.......

Second... where do I send my proofs... I'm convinced now.... :)

Much Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg
Send me a case of pineapples (no poi) and I'll edit your posts for accuracy for thirty one days. - by Ace Coldiron
I grew up on poi and milk... with sugar.... maybe you've put yer finger on the problem..... sn;

Aloha.... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
This thread appears to have ran its course. I am going to close it down. - by Jeff Blackwell
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