Home > Resistance > If you can handle your prospect's objection(s) effectively they will buy.

If you can handle your prospect's objection(s) effectively they will buy.

Do you believe that if you can handle your prospect's objection(s) effectively they will buy? - by Seth
No. This is about providing your client with the best value of your offering.. If there is an objection, you've failed to provide assurance or answer to the question of "does your offering do the job". Have you done your job of questioning, identifying and relating your product or service to the needs, wants, or desires of your client?

Objections, I've been recently schooled, are conditions. I've been led to understand that a condition is a fundamental circumstance that has to be addressed and if to be overcome, may have to have modications made to the original proposal to be acceptable.

The foregoing is my opinion, generated by myself and is of my own doing.

Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Do you believe that if you can handle your prospect's objection(s) effectively they will buy?
No, I think they'll buy if you don't handle the objection effectively. Doh! - by Skip Anderson
I voted no... I think that your prospect will more than likely give objections, people usulally have questions, unless you are superman salesman and completely irresistable thmbp2; and overcoming them is part of the sales process; but with that being said, even if you can overcome them, it does NOT mean they will buy. You can overcome obejctions, but if you haven't "sold" them on whatever it is you are trying to get them to part with thier dollars for, they won't do it no matter how much you overcome.

As mentioned by another poster... my opinion entirely :un

Lisa - by lisamom
You can overcome obejctions, but if you haven't "sold" them on whatever it is you are trying to get them to part with thier dollars for, they won't do it no matter how much you overcome.

As mentioned by another poster... my opinion entirely :un

Lisa
Lisa, what you're describing is a false objection, not an objection. If the prospect has a real, genuine objection, and you successfully handle that objection, they will buy. If you're unsuccessful at handling that objection, they won't buy.

An objection is something that stands between you and the sale. If you handle the objection successfully, then of course that means the prospect bought.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Lisa, what you're describing is a false objection, not an objection. If the prospect has a real, genuine objection, and you successfully handle that objection, they will buy. If you're unsuccessful at handling that objection, they won't buy.
Skip what qualifies what Lisa described as a "false objection"?

An objection is something that stands between you and the sale. If you handle the objection successfully, then of course that means the prospect bought.
"Indifference", is something that can stand between a salesperson and a sale and by your definition qualifies as an objection. How do you recommend salespeople handle that objection effectively? - by Seth
Skip what qualifies what Lisa described as a "false objection"?

"Indifference", is something that can stand between a salesperson and a sale and by your definition qualifies as an objection. How do you recommend salespeople handle that objection effectively?
Indifference is a lack of need or a lack of interest, not an objection. If the prospect is indifferent, you won't (or shouldn't) be giving a presentation or asking for the sale. In my book, an objection is something that is raised after a closing action. Perhaps we have different definitions of "objection".

skip - by Skip Anderson
In my book, an objection is something that is raised after a closing action. Perhaps we have different definitions of "objection".
In your previous post you said, "An objection is something that stands between you and the sale." so I brought up "Indifference".

Now you say, "In my book, an objection is something that is raised after a closing action." Is that your final answer? - by Seth
Some nationalities are naturally reticent in dialog. Some nationalities or personalities may allow you to go through a presentation hoping you won't convince them on the way. When push comes to shove, because you have thoughtout your presentation and he has no argument, the irrational then is all that's left.

Who knows why someone will move forward with a sales situation, but sometimes they get themselves invoved in it when they shouldn't have. This happens occasionally and is just something we deal with, but a salesman SHOULD have tried to qualify this client a litte better, but life happens.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
In your previous post you said, "An objection is something that stands between you and the sale." so I brought up "Indifference".

Now you say, "In my book, an objection is something that is raised after a closing action." Is that your final answer?
Those are both my answers!

Look, Seth, here is what I think might be happening in this thread and in other threads:

To me, an "objection" occurs during the selling process after closing, not during the prospecting process to find a prospect who might be interested in my product or service.

If I call a company to see what they're doing for sales training and what needs they might have, I'm prospecting. I'm looking for a prospect. If they tell me they already have a source for sales training or they're not interested or whatever, I don't consider that an objection. They're just refusing to becoming a prospect because of indifference, a lack of need, or some other reason.

Do you consider that an objection? It's okay if you do, I'm not saying you (or others) are wrong, but I think if we're going to debate issues surrounding an objection we should agree what an objection is, and I have a feeling that we have a couple different definitions floating around.

Here is how I look at an objection: You've found a prospect, you've completed a needs and desires investigation, you've given a presentation of your product/service, you've asked a trial close question, and you've commenced a closing action (please forgive the simplification here). You've gotten green lights all along the way. But after you ask for the business, the prospect says, "I have to discuss it with my wife." To me, THAT is an objection. And if effectively handled, will not stand in the way of the sale going through.

So that's my best quick description of an objection in my lexicon. Nobody has to agree with me, of course, but that's it for me. Seth (and others), what do you consider an objection (or what do you NOT consider an objection)?

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson

Here is how I look at an objection: You've found a prospect, you've completed a needs and desires investigation, you've given a presentation of your product/service, you've asked a trial close question, and you've commenced a closing action (please forgive the simplification here). You've gotten green lights all along the way. But after you ask for the business, the prospect says, "I have to discuss it with my wife." To me, THAT is an objection. And if effectively handled, will not stand in the way of the sale going through.

Skip Anderson
To switch gears here into something a little more interesting, how would you handle that?

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Challenge #1: I think that many sales people apply the label of "objection" to many things that I wouldn't consider an objection such as indifference, indecision, skepticism, etc.

To me an objection is something the prospect "objects" to relating to what is being offered. (Example: I object to the X [color] of the Y [car].)

Challenge #2: Saying that if you handle the objection successfully the prospect will buy can be interpreted as, if the prospect didn't buy it was because you didn't handle the objection successfully. This interpretation can set the salesperson up for failure because not all objections can be overcome. - by Seth
Challenge #2: Saying that if you handle the objection successfully the prospect will buy can be interpreted as, if the prospect didn't buy it was because you didn't handle the objection successfully.

This interpretation can set the salesperson up for failure because not all objections can be overcome.
Why don't you explain yourself here. If you have an objection and you don't handle it... ummmmmm?????

How in the world does that set me up for faiure because an objection wasn't overcome, and obviously not ALL objections can be overcome... sooooooo.... ????? - by rattus58
To switch gears here into something a little more interesting, how would you handle that?

Aloha... Tom :cool:
Great question, Tom.

For starters, I work with people who sell to customers in customers' homes (to consumers) and in retail, and real estate, financial services, and insurance. I'm a B2C sales trainer, so my answer will come from that perspective.

First, a well-designed sales process should try to identify the "spouse objection" earlier in the process. It will still come up at closing, but if you can identify it earlier, you can often times proceed in a different manner to knock out the spouse objection earlier.

Having said that, here's a way that often works if you think your prospect wants to purchase your product, but is either reluctant, or has thrown up an automatic spouse objection without really thinking about it:

Customer: "You know, I need to talk to my husband; we always talk these things over before we do anything like this."

Me: "Absolutely, I understand! You know I'm a husband, too! But let me ask you this, Mrs. Customer. Aside from your husband, how do YOU feel about moving ahead with this (the sofa, the custom closet, the new driveway, whatever) today?

[of course, here it could take several detours, but I'll just pick a response for the sake of playing this out].

Customer: "Oh, I feel really good about it. The color is right, it has the right style and the price was in the range we were thinking of. I just want to run it by my husband first and make sure he's on board."

Me: "Mrs. Customer, what do you think your customer will say when you talk to him about your desire to own this sofa?"

Customer: "Oh, he'll probably say 'go ahead'. He probably will think it's a waste of money, but he has his toys, too, and I think we really need a new sofa. Our sofa is so ratty it's kind of embarassing."

Me: "I've got a great idea! Since you're on board with owning this new sofa, and your best guess is your husband will be, too, let's go ahead and write up the order now, since you're here and I'm here. Then you go home and talk it over with your husband, and if you want to cancel the order, all you need to do is call me tonight here at the store and leave me a message. I'll be here until we close at 9 o'clock. But that we, we don't have to waste any of your time by having to come back to the store. What credit card would you like to use?"

[When I was selling, I handled many, many spouse objections by handing the buyer the phone and saying, "I understand, you want to talk to your husband. Here's the phone, go ahead and give him a call...I'll be right over here, just let me know when you're done talking about it." You wouldn't believe how many times the wife couldn't even get the husband on the phone, but she hung up the phone and said something like, "Oh, he didn't pick up, he's probably in a meeting. But you know what, let's go ahead with it...I think he'll be okay with it!"]

When I have talked in these SalesPractice threads about effectively handling an objection, this is the type of thing I'm talking about. It's effective if the prospect ends up buying, not effective if they don't.

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Hi Skip... :)

Thank you.... :) One of the things I liked about your approach to the client is reaffirming THEIR decision to move forward with the sale in spite of the spouse FIRST. First come first served... thmbp2;

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Why does it have to be all or nothing? Would it be too much to ask for a bit more creativity in these polls?

Answering objections effectively is obviously a good thing. However there are still forces beyond your control or your prospect's control that will lead to no sale.

In other words... there are just some objections that you simply cannot overcome.

Here is one that I can't overcome. The doctor I'm selling to is buddies with my competitor's rep. He does millions of dollars in business with this rep because he sells the implants the surgeon works with. My product is worth peanuts compared to the volume of the implant sales however the rep is smart to bundle in the product in question with the other business. At the end of the day the doctor will go with the guy he's buddies with and who's given him a better deal financially speaking. Regardless if my product is of superior quality or even cheaper on a side by side comparison.

Happens all the time. Sometimes doctors will refuse to switch over because they have used that system for 20 years. Regardless of how many published clinical results you show them, how many guidelines you show them that they are breaking, regardless of how many nurses talk to them or how many administrators. etc.

I refuse to take responsibility for obstinate clients like that and somehow say that I didn't answer any objection "effectively". Sorry. - by Andrea
I will also add that to me an objection is whatever stands in your way of getting the sale when you know that the customer is qualified and most def in the market.

In my examples above the objections would be:

- The competitor brand is better known (this is how they diplomatically say it to me)
- The doctor prefers to stick with what he already us used to. - by Andrea
Hi Andrea.... :)

"Answering objections effectively is obviously a good thing. However there are still forces beyond your control or your prospect's control that will lead to no sale.

In other words... there are just some objections that you simply cannot overcome
."

That's correct, but I don't think that is a qualifying condition here is it? Politics, family, and just whatever... can be an un-sale.

I used to try my best to make sales in places sales were not going to be made... youthful indisgression... aka headagainstwallsyndrome... I'm slowly learning... sn;

Aloha.... shds; ;bg



- by rattus58
Hi Andrea.... :)

"Answering objections effectively is obviously a good thing. However there are still forces beyond your control or your prospect's control that will lead to no sale.

In other words... there are just some objections that you simply cannot overcome
."

That's correct, but I don't think that is a qualifying condition here is it? Politics, family, and just whatever... can be an un-sale.

I used to try my best to make sales in places sales were not going to be made... youthful indisgression... aka headagainstwallsyndrome... I'm slowly learning... sn;

Aloha.... shds; ;bg



Hi Tom...

I don't get too caught up in whether something is defined a certain way or not.

You may call it a qualifying condition or an objection or a non-sale or whatever. Bottom line is that certain situations cannot be overcome and it is paramount that one identifies them the sooner the better so that one can move on.

I don't beat myself up over these situations nor take a huge amount of time to try to overcome them. Gotta flip them and flip them fast because if this one is not willing to buy there are hundreds of other people to call who will.

My strategy is knowing that there are people out there who are qualified prospects and will buy my product and my job is to go out there and find them and sell to them. Otherwise I'm not gonna waste my time in trying to sell to someone who isn't interested in what I have to offer. - by Andrea
My strategy is knowing that there are people out there who are qualified prospects and will buy my product and my job is to go out there and find them and sell to them. Otherwise I'm not gonna waste my time in trying to sell to someone who isn't interested in what I have to offer.
Hi Andread... sn;
Nothing else matters, does it..... thmbp2;

Much Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Great question, Tom.

For starters, I work with people who sell to customers in customers' homes (to consumers) and in retail, and real estate, financial services, and insurance. I'm a B2C sales trainer, so my answer will come from that perspective.

First, a well-designed sales process should try to identify the "spouse objection" earlier in the process. It will still come up at closing, but if you can identify it earlier, you can often times proceed in a different manner to knock out the spouse objection earlier.

Having said that, here's a way that often works if you think your prospect wants to purchase your product, but is either reluctant, or has thrown up an automatic spouse objection without really thinking about it:

Customer: "You know, I need to talk to my husband; we always talk these things over before we do anything like this."

Me: "Absolutely, I understand! You know I'm a husband, too! But let me ask you this, Mrs. Customer. Aside from your husband, how do YOU feel about moving ahead with this (the sofa, the custom closet, the new driveway, whatever) today?

[of course, here it could take several detours, but I'll just pick a response for the sake of playing this out].

Customer: "Oh, I feel really good about it. The color is right, it has the right style and the price was in the range we were thinking of. I just want to run it by my husband first and make sure he's on board."

Me: "Mrs. Customer, what do you think your customer will say when you talk to him about your desire to own this sofa?"

Customer: "Oh, he'll probably say 'go ahead'. He probably will think it's a waste of money, but he has his toys, too, and I think we really need a new sofa. Our sofa is so ratty it's kind of embarassing."

Me: "I've got a great idea! Since you're on board with owning this new sofa, and your best guess is your husband will be, too, let's go ahead and write up the order now, since you're here and I'm here. Then you go home and talk it over with your husband, and if you want to cancel the order, all you need to do is call me tonight here at the store and leave me a message. I'll be here until we close at 9 o'clock. But that we, we don't have to waste any of your time by having to come back to the store. What credit card would you like to use?"

[When I was selling, I handled many, many spouse objections by handing the buyer the phone and saying, "I understand, you want to talk to your husband. Here's the phone, go ahead and give him a call...I'll be right over here, just let me know when you're done talking about it." You wouldn't believe how many times the wife couldn't even get the husband on the phone, but she hung up the phone and said something like, "Oh, he didn't pick up, he's probably in a meeting. But you know what, let's go ahead with it...I think he'll be okay with it!"]

When I have talked in these SalesPractice threads about effectively handling an objection, this is the type of thing I'm talking about. It's effective if the prospect ends up buying, not effective if they don't.

Skip Anderson
Hi Skip

I like your approach. It is creative, firm, respectful, direct and what I like best is that it places the customer in the drivers seat in the sense that you get their agreement first and the rest is all details. What I love the most is the use of "time" Nobody wants to waste time and by getting them to sign now and turning it into a time saving measure is awesome.

I'm a big fan of getting things DONE. Taking control and being decisive. Your approach motivates your customer to be just that and I think it's great!! thmbp2; - by Andrea
In other words... there are just some objections that you simply cannot overcome.
I agree with you. thmbp2;

I refuse to take responsibility for obstinate clients like that and somehow say that I didn't answer any objection "effectively". Sorry.
I wouldn't either. thmbp2; - by Seth
Hi Skip

I like your approach. It is creative, firm, respectful, direct and what I like best is that it places the customer in the drivers seat in the sense that you get their agreement first and the rest is all details. What I love the most is the use of "time" Nobody wants to waste time and by getting them to sign now and turning it into a time saving measure is awesome.

I'm a big fan of getting things DONE. Taking control and being decisive. Your approach motivates your customer to be just that and I think it's great!! thmbp2;
Thanks very much, Andrea.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Hi Skip... :)

Thank you.... :) One of the things I liked about your approach to the client is reaffirming THEIR decision to move forward with the sale in spite of the spouse FIRST. First come first served... thmbp2;

Aloha... Tom :cool:
Thanks Tom, I appreciate your kind words.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
The thank you is all mine... you remind me of the fact that there are lots of tools out there that are time tested but dusty, on the one hand, and staring you in the face on the other, but like a bright star at night, you can't see it if you're staring right at it. Simplicity has a certain elegance to it... thmbp2;

Much Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Great question, Tom.

For starters, I work with people who sell to customers in customers' homes (to consumers) and in retail, and real estate, financial services, and insurance. I'm a B2C sales trainer, so my answer will come from that perspective.

First, a well-designed sales process should try to identify the "spouse objection" earlier in the process. It will still come up at closing, but if you can identify it earlier, you can often times proceed in a different manner to knock out the spouse objection earlier.

Having said that, here's a way that often works if you think your prospect wants to purchase your product, but is either reluctant, or has thrown up an automatic spouse objection without really thinking about it:

Customer: "You know, I need to talk to my husband; we always talk these things over before we do anything like this."

Me: "Absolutely, I understand! You know I'm a husband, too! But let me ask you this, Mrs. Customer. Aside from your husband, how do YOU feel about moving ahead with this (the sofa, the custom closet, the new driveway, whatever) today?

[of course, here it could take several detours, but I'll just pick a response for the sake of playing this out].

Customer: "Oh, I feel really good about it. The color is right, it has the right style and the price was in the range we were thinking of. I just want to run it by my husband first and make sure he's on board."

Me: "Mrs. Customer, what do you think your customer will say when you talk to him about your desire to own this sofa?"

Customer: "Oh, he'll probably say 'go ahead'. He probably will think it's a waste of money, but he has his toys, too, and I think we really need a new sofa. Our sofa is so ratty it's kind of embarassing."

Me: "I've got a great idea! Since you're on board with owning this new sofa, and your best guess is your husband will be, too, let's go ahead and write up the order now, since you're here and I'm here. Then you go home and talk it over with your husband, and if you want to cancel the order, all you need to do is call me tonight here at the store and leave me a message. I'll be here until we close at 9 o'clock. But that we, we don't have to waste any of your time by having to come back to the store. What credit card would you like to use?"

[When I was selling, I handled many, many spouse objections by handing the buyer the phone and saying, "I understand, you want to talk to your husband. Here's the phone, go ahead and give him a call...I'll be right over here, just let me know when you're done talking about it." You wouldn't believe how many times the wife couldn't even get the husband on the phone, but she hung up the phone and said something like, "Oh, he didn't pick up, he's probably in a meeting. But you know what, let's go ahead with it...I think he'll be okay with it!"]

When I have talked in these SalesPractice threads about effectively handling an objection, this is the type of thing I'm talking about. It's effective if the prospect ends up buying, not effective if they don't.

Skip Anderson
that stuff right there, thats got you a new customer Skip, man if you give that kinda stuff away the stuff you charge for HAS to be good. - by thecanuck22
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