Home > Social Influence > How does this statement 'fit' your idea of selling?

How does this statement 'fit' your idea of selling?

"The beginning is really important. How you present options to a client causes them to be VERY likely to choose the one you want them to!"

By the way, I edited the statement from a book. It is different enough that I did not plagiarize but, more importantly, in this form it might allow for discussion. - by Gold Calling
I think that by the time you are ready to present, you both should have some idea of what is needed. You the salesman, should be making the call on what your experience dictates is the proper product or service. That in mind, if you have any bias as to what is right for your client I believe that you naturally try to marshall this towards your client.

Aloha.... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
I don't know how much you edited the original but if the premise was that one of the options the customer had would be to go elswhere or even decide NOT to make a purchase.

I like to think of us salespeople as doctors. We kinda know what the answer (product/medicine) should be, based on the symptoms displayed by the patient (customer).

Obviously the more experience we have then the more likely we are to know which solution would be best....sometimes even before we start to qualify (examine) the (patient) customer. - by helisell
I think that by the time you are ready to present, you both should have some idea of what is needed. You the salesman, should be making the call on what your experience dictates is the proper product or service. That in mind, if you have any bias as to what is right for your client I believe that you naturally try to marshall this towards your client.

Aloha.... shds; ;bg
I totally agree with you Tom. Well said.

I do think that how you present things will impact what the customer will choose. Though it's no guarantee.

In my case they can go for the cheap model and for the higher end model and I offer between the two making a recommendation what would be better for them and why. Whichever model they choose I still win but obviously I want to sell the one that is higher value. - by Andrea
I don't know how much you edited the original but if the premise was that one of the options the customer had would be to go elswhere or even decide NOT to make a purchase.

I like to think of us salespeople as doctors. We kinda know what the answer (product/medicine) should be, based on the symptoms displayed by the patient (customer).

Obviously the more experience we have then the more likely we are to know which solution would be best....sometimes even before we start to qualify (examine) the (patient) customer.
In this case you could call us spin doctors!! I'm a big believer on spinning things in the way you want them... thmbp2; - by Andrea
"The beginning is really important. How you present options to a client causes them to be VERY likely to choose the one you want them to!"
I believe that is absolutely true. My own selling and results is very consistent with that.

I also agree with Rattus but his post is really a different context on the topic. - by Ace Coldiron
Hi Andrea,

Would you still want to sell the higher value one if the lower value one was better for the customer? - by helisell
My definition of sales is this....'helping someone see that a problem they have, can be resolved effectively and better by using my services than someone elses; Selling involves getting a prospective customer 'comfortable with me, trust me, and then believe in my service therefore leading to a decision'.

The better the sales person is at truly uncovering the problems, what those problems are costing the prospect, what the prospect has tried already (even though the problems may still exist) and why does the problem still exist, then the better prepared they will be to show the prospect their solution. The most important element is getting the prospect to be committed to make a decision when you make your presentation, even if that decision is that they are NI, in what you have to offer. - by Paulette Halpern
"The beginning is really important. How you present options to a client causes them to be VERY likely to choose the one you want them to!"

By the way, I edited the statement from a book. It is different enough that I did not plagiarize but, more importantly, in this form it might allow for discussion.
My words here are not my own, but I'm in no danger of plagiarizing this particular author whose words I follow closely and adhere to:
  • You must control your customers' perceptions.
  • You must know your customer will buy your product.
The subject of "merchandising" seldom, if ever, appears on these pages, perhaps because it seems to be somebody else's department. But I'm an advocate of borrowing that particular function, and applying it to selling one-on-one. In what seems like another life I was once the CEO of a chain of retail stores, and the biggest thing I took from that experience is something that imploded in my own mind. It is this: Great merchandising is the limitation of the offering--not the expansion.

For that reason, along with others, "How you present options to a client causes them to be VERY likely to choose the one you want them to!" makes a lot of sense to me.

Notice that Paulette said "...better prepared they will be to show the prospect their solution.." instead of "find a solution".

She comes prepared with the solution, and in a word I use and value quite a bit, The Proposition. - by Ace Coldiron
Hi Andrea,

Would you still want to sell the higher value one if the lower value one was better for the customer?
In my line of business it is fairly obvious when a product does not "fit" with the person's needs. I will not recommend something that is not better for the customer. I will sell the higher value one but only if the customer wants to buy it (in spite of the fact that I've recommended they get the cheaper one).

Whenever I have doubts as to whether the person wanting to buy my product is actually making a good purchase I warn them. I tell them my recommendation and why and I ask them "are you sure you want to do this?" and if they say yes I will tell them that it is up to them and they are free to buy what they want... but (cuz the customer is always right) And I also warn them that in the event they wish to return the product we will apply a 20% re-stocking fee so they better be super sure they are purchasing the correct item.

In my line of business (medical) safety is of concern and sometimes cheap doctors want to get away with something unsafe and I won't let them. Or if we do make the sale we make strong warnings and tell them that if they do not use the product as it was intended they are on their own in terms of liability etc.

Thankfully this doesn't happen often but it has been known to happen. - by Andrea
"The beginning is really important. How you present options to a client causes them to be VERY likely to choose the one you want them to!"
Gold Calling perception rules the roost. A 2 at 10 is a 10 at 2. ;wi - by SalesProfessor
I like to think of us salespeople as doctors. We kinda know what the answer (product/medicine) should be, based on the symptoms displayed by the patient (customer).
I couldn't agree with you more.

I've always seen selling as more of a consultant role... just like a tax agent, personal trainer, doctor or anyone else who collaborates information about their client then makes an expertise recommendation. - by MrCharisma
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