Home > Interview > Who uses more/different skill......who earns more?

Who uses more/different skill......who earns more?

Here's a question.

I keep reading here about cold calling....selling....are they the same thing........different?

Here are two scenarios . . .

1. Big furniture store or a large car showroom:
The salespeople interact with customers who are visiting the premises as a result of $xxxxxx being spent on huge advertising campaigns by the business owner. The do their thing (sales/selling) and get paid on results.

2. Large insurance/investment company:
The salespeople use whatever means is at their disposal, telephone, cold calling refferrals or whatever to first of all 'find' a potential customer and then subsequently (having appointed them or done sone selling face to face or on the telephone) they do their thing (sales/selling) and get paid onresults.

I have worked in both scenarios over the years and have my own views about which one takes more skill, which one should be paid more.

I usually make a distinction between 'cold calling' and 'selling' because of the 2 situations outlined above. I have worked with many highly skilled and successful salespeople from both camps and whilst many of their skills overlap, there is clearly a demand for one particular skill above, that is not required in the other.

So my questions are....which job is more difficult/easier?

Which one should have the higher potential earnings?

Which one would YOU rather do? - by helisell
I'm selling insurance. The job is vastly different at the outset, though a salesperson at Walmart could make cold calls too... I suppose.... it's not likely.

If I am attempting to persuade someone, I am attempting to "sell" someone. Just look to your grandchildren in a toystore... :)

Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Helisell,

I appreciate the distinction you make and, although everything you describe is technically "selling", I, too tend to use the two terms of "cold calling" (or more accurately, "prospecting") and selling.

Personally, I don't think one is harder or easier. To be a top sales performer in either category you need significant skills.

That's my two cents.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Hi Skip.....15 years ago I may have agreed with you but...

About 12 years ago I personally started to recruit and train (and worked in the field with) the largest direct (door to door) sales team in the UK.

Many of the prospective candidates we took on were from successful sales backgrounds.

However, when faced with the reality of being on a doorstep and doing the pre-presentation job of getting into the house....they failed dismally. Not only failed but suffered tremendous setbacks in their personal confidence.

This despite the fact that they received the same training as many totally inexperienced people who went on to be very successful.

So despit being 'successful' salespeople they couldn't cut it in the big bad world of direct sales.....and this is why I now recognise that there is a huge difference in the skillset and personality type required when we look st the two activities...'canvassing and selling'

Some can do the 'selling' bit but die a thousand deaths when having to canvass/prospect.

I hate using these simple words like 'selling' 'canvassing' prospecting' for things that demand a much longer explanation but I'm assuming everyone here knows that it's a 'given' that we know these are complex subjects.

So I still maintain that there is a big difference between the two activities. - by helisell
I don't disagree about the challenges of door-to-door selling and canvassing.

And selling in the home is similar, and retail can be similar too (although the state of selling in most retail establishments has sunk to such a low level that we have to take that into account).

I've said many times, and written many times, that most b2b salespeople would fail miserably in a one-call close scenario. I've seen it happen, too...over and over again. You have to have highly refined sales skills to do the type of selling you're talking about, helisell. I'm with you on that.

That's one reason I get my dander up when I see various people talk about their perceived lack of importance of "closing" or "handling objection" and the like.

On the other hand, I've seen amazing cold callers who have a gift...they can consistently get through to the corporate decision maker where others fail repeatedly. That's an important skill, too.

Best,

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Yeah Skip...I can see that we are on the same hymn sheet.

We are probably talking about the huge differences between corporate 'multi meeting' sales situations and the 'down and dirty', 'take 'em out the market' 'one hit' 'one chance' sales situation.

Different jobs and different skills as you say.

Cheers - by helisell
Hi Skip.....15 years ago I may have agreed with you but...

About 12 years ago I personally started to recruit and train (and worked in the field with) the largest direct (door to door) sales team in the UK.

Many of the prospective candidates we took on were from successful sales backgrounds.

However, when faced with the reality of being on a doorstep and doing the pre-presentation job of getting into the house....they failed dismally. Not only failed but suffered tremendous setbacks in their personal confidence.

This despite the fact that they received the same training as many totally inexperienced people who went on to be very successful.

So despit being 'successful' salespeople they couldn't cut it in the big bad world of direct sales.....and this is why I now recognise that there is a huge difference in the skillset and personality type required when we look st the two activities...'canvassing and selling'

Some can do the 'selling' bit but die a thousand deaths when having to canvass/prospect.

I hate using these simple words like 'selling' 'canvassing' prospecting' for things that demand a much longer explanation but I'm assuming everyone here knows that it's a 'given' that we know these are complex subjects.

So I still maintain that there is a big difference between the two activities.
Your points are well taken.

I share similar experience and observations. I also was at one time a trainer with one of the largest direct sales organizations in the world, and I also have spent much time in the world of the complex sale.

I want to point out that there is more than one culture that exists in the general field of what we call selling. Principles remain intact, but the attitudes and motivations, and one's place in the general scheme of things, vary widely. - by Ace Coldiron
So my questions are....which job is more difficult/easier?
Scenario #2 is clearly more difficult.

Which one should have the higher potential earnings?
Scenario #2 should have the higher potential earnings.

Which one would YOU rather do?
I would much rather work scenario #2. - by Seth
Scenario #2 is clearly more difficult.

Scenario #2 should have the higher potential earnings.

I would much rather work scenario #2.
Seth, it's not clear to me that #2 is more difficult. So how about you share your insight with those of us who don't share your clarity?

Why should #2 have the higher earning potential in your opinion?

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Seth, it's not clear to me that #2 is more difficult. So how about you share your insight with those of us who don't share your clarity?

Why should #2 have the higher earning potential in your opinion?

Skip
Scenario #2 requires involves prospecting AND selling. That's pretty clear. - by Seth
Scenario #2 requires involves prospecting AND selling. That's pretty clear.
Since when does sitting in a store not require prospecting and selling? Furnture stores, auto dealerships, cookie stores, all require sales and many of these involve prospecting as well. Maybe you could help me out here MORE THOROUGHLY. - by rattus58
Since when does sitting in a store not require prospecting and selling? Furnture stores, auto dealerships, cookie stores, all require sales and many of these involve prospecting as well. Maybe you could help me out here MORE THOROUGHLY.
Since the scenario said so:

1. Big furniture store or a large car showroom:
The salespeople interact with customers who are visiting the premises as a result of $xxxxxx being spent on huge advertising campaigns by the business owner. The do their thing (sales/selling) and get paid on results.
- by Seth
Here's a question.

I keep reading here about cold calling....selling....are they the same thing........different?

Here are two scenarios . . .

1. Big furniture store or a large car showroom:
The salespeople interact with customers who are visiting the premises as a result of $xxxxxx being spent on huge advertising campaigns by the business owner. The do their thing (sales/selling) and get paid on results.

2. Large insurance/investment company:
The salespeople use whatever means is at their disposal, telephone, cold calling refferrals or whatever to first of all 'find' a potential customer and then subsequently (having appointed them or done sone selling face to face or on the telephone) they do their thing (sales/selling) and get paid onresults.

I have worked in both scenarios over the years and have my own views about which one takes more skill, which one should be paid more.

I usually make a distinction between 'cold calling' and 'selling' because of the 2 situations outlined above. I have worked with many highly skilled and successful salespeople from both camps and whilst many of their skills overlap, there is clearly a demand for one particular skill above, that is not required in the other.

So my questions are....which job is more difficult/easier?

Which one should have the higher potential earnings?

Which one would YOU rather do?
Since Seth cannot read.... - by rattus58
OK let me see if I can clarify.

Go into a car dealership (I've worked in 'em for years) walk up to a salesman and ask him what he is doing....(like 'what are you doing right now')

I guarantee that he will tell you either . . .what he has just finished doing....or what he is about to start doing......as for what he is actually doing right now.....

He is hoping that a red hot customer will walk in the door. Same goes for out furniture salesman.

If we ask the same question in a cold calling environment like a call centre say....or if we ask a door to door canvasser they will tell us...I'm calling...or I'm canvassing.

Some sales jobs are mostly re-active and some are mostly pro-active. So.....

So my questions are....which job is more difficult/easier?

Which one should have the higher potential earnings?

Which one would YOU rather do?
- by helisell
I flew for an auto dealership for 30 years. We've been associated with other dealers for a number of years that sold my wife one of her first cars. Some salesman will sit and drink coffee. Some will innovate.

In both cases they made what you make of it. Furniture Stores also have potential for high earnings if you make of it what you want.

I believe that you can make of your life what you make it. A call center does NOT have to be limiting. Stock Brokers made millions from call centers. I have a friend who was in the time share business and made an average of $250 to $300,000 till he died in a bike accident.

Personally I prefer the business I'm in, but there are those who do well and some who don't. I think that there are very few sales jobs that are necessarily maybe limited, but if you sell something it is up to you to create new and different ways to hawk your wares.

Aloha.... Tom - by rattus58
Hmmmmm no red marks yet this morning... thmbp2; - by rattus58
Go for it Seth.... Why don't you give me a reputation mark everytime I post something. And since I'm being reputationed at almost every post by you, why don't you grow up and become an adult. - by rattus58
You won't get any red marks from me rattus....I love your posts.
Keep 'em coming. - by helisell
You won't get any red marks from me rattus....I love your posts.
Keep 'em coming.
Thank you.... I'm awash in red ink nowadays.... I'm gonna be needing a transfusion soon.... :)

Much Aloha.... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Go for it Seth.... Why don't you give me a reputation mark everytime I post something. And since I'm being reputationed at almost every post by you, why don't you grow up and become an adult.
C'mon, Tom...Seth's gone, and I don't want to be put in the awkward position of deleting...

The heck with the red marks. You are a valued and valuable contributor here. - by Ace Coldiron
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