Home > Interview > You've got three minutes...

You've got three minutes...

"Ok.... You've got Three Minutes... Whatdya got for me this morning?"

What is the most important aspect of your presentation to your client when you are given a compressed time schedule to present.

Do you:
1) Small talk to create repor?
2) Go right into your presentation?
3) Ask him if you can bid against your competition?
4) Ask him that since you have only 3 minutes what are the "three things he likes best about his current product, the three things he likes least about his current product, how well does he get restocked, what else can he tell about his current product that sticks out... good or bad?

What else would you ask him or what other approach would you take?

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
What is the most important aspect of your presentation to your client.....
The Proposition. No close seconds. - by Ace Coldiron
I've done this multiple times (3-10 minutes depending on customer) and have been successful every time.

Forget rapport, quickly find out what is important to the customer then recommend your product and inject rapport then. This often will extend your time for a few more minutes. - by MrCharisma
My experience tells me whensomeone who says "you've got 3 minutes whadya got for me this morning?" they are trying to take/keep control & intimidate a salesperson. Neither one works in a salesperson's favor. Try this - "I can tell you everything I know in about a minute & a half... then what will we do with the rest of our time?" If you don't dis-arm that person he/she will own you for the rest of the relationship (if any). You'll never get your price, your terms, your timing. Who wants to deal with a prospect like that. Are we forgetting SALESPEOPLE HAVE RIGHTS? - by Dave Tear
My experience tells me whensomeone who says "you've got 3 minutes whadya got for me this morning?" they are trying to take/keep control & intimidate a salesperson. Neither one works in a salesperson's favor. Try this - "I can tell you everything I know in about a minute & a half... then what will we do with the rest of our time?" If you don't dis-arm that person he/she will own you for the rest of the relationship (if any). You'll never get your price, your terms, your timing. Who wants to deal with a prospect like that. Are we forgetting SALESPEOPLE HAVE RIGHTS?
Hahahahahha..... thmbp2; - by rattus58
Walk away! You've got a suspect and not a prospect. - by Jim Klein
Truer words have never been spoken, Jim! Hats off to you!sn; - by Dave Tear
Walk away! You've got a suspect and not a prospect.
Ok, given that you have a suspect, why walk away? Why not try then to qualify your client into a prospect?

Much Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
my answer... it would depend what stage of the game I'm in. If it is a cold call or if it is a warm call or a follow up call... Regardless of the stage I'm in within 3 minutes I will state the reason for my call... convey the value of my calling (i.e. proposition) and then get them to commit to a next step. - by Andrea
my answer... it would depend what stage of the game I'm in. If it is a cold call or if it is a warm call or a follow up call... Regardless of the stage I'm in within 3 minutes I will state the reason for my call... convey the value of my calling (i.e. proposition) and then get them to commit to a next step.
I like that approach actually, especially the idea that you make a short sweet "proposition" and then a commitment objective to the next step.

See I'm learning to use a new word.... "proposition".

Much Aloha... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
I've never had a product or service which 3 minutes would cover adequately. I am, however, a strong believer in having an "elevator pitch" on the tip of my tongue (ie. a concise message which a SR can deliver if he's bumped into the decision maker while riding the elevator).

Depending on what you're selling, you might start with, "... Our long term clients consistently express interest in our ability to deliver on the promise of (improved productivity, decreased cost, greater customer satisfaction, etc.). I'd appreciate your consent to gathering information from your department heads, so, that I can present some factual information ... would Tuesday or Wednesday of next week be better?

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
I've never had a product or service which 3 minutes would cover adequately.
As far as I'm concerned 3 minutes is a goldmine of attention from a customer on the initial approach. These days people's attention span is becoming shorter and shorter. They have many demands and even if you had a longer time with them you can't be guaranteed that they will be giving you their full attention. Their mind might wander in the middle of your spiel.

I used to be frustrated when I felt that I didn't have enough time in front of the customer to present my value proposition. So then I had to learn to be concise, direct and effective.

My take on this is why would a prospect give you more than 3 minutes of their time if they perceive no value in talking to you? They have to feel that it will be in their best interest to give you more time. So within that 3 minutes you have to qualify them (not fully but enough to know how to present the value prop and to determine if they are a prospect or a suspect) and present them the value proposition in order to get them to agree to give you more of their time.

My time is valuable too I don't have time to waste on suspects as someone else stated. If they aren't interested and if they can let me know as soon as possible then I can move on to the next one. If you won't buy there are plenty of other people who will. That's my philosophy. - by Andrea
As far as I'm concerned 3 minutes is a goldmine of attention from a customer on the initial approach. These days people's attention span is becoming shorter and shorter. They have many demands and even if you had a longer time with them you can't be guaranteed that they will be giving you their full attention. Their mind might wander in the middle of your spiel.

I used to be frustrated when I felt that I didn't have enough time in front of the customer to present my value proposition. So then I had to learn to be concise, direct and effective.

My take on this is why would a prospect give you more than 3 minutes of their time if they perceive no value in talking to you? They have to feel that it will be in their best interest to give you more time. So within that 3 minutes you have to qualify them (not fully but enough to know how to present the value prop and to determine if they are a prospect or a suspect) and present them the value proposition in order to get them to agree to give you more of their time.

My time is valuable too I don't have time to waste on suspects as someone else stated. If they aren't interested and if they can let me know as soon as possible then I can move on to the next one. If you won't buy there are plenty of other people who will. That's my philosophy.
"So within that 3 minutes you have to qualify them (not fully but enough to know how to present the value prop and to determine if they are a prospect or a suspect) and present them the value proposition in order to get them to agree to give you more of their time"

thmbp2;

Aloha.... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
"So within that 3 minutes you have to qualify them (not fully but enough to know how to present the value prop and to determine if they are a prospect or a suspect) and present them the value proposition in order to get them to agree to give you more of their time"

thmbp2;

Aloha.... shds; ;bg
Well Andrea, my agreeing with your post caused someone some real heartburn, so fer my validations, I might wind up bein a redskin.... :) - by rattus58
Well Andrea, my agreeing with your post caused someone some real heartburn, so fer my validations, I might wind up bein a redskin.... :)
Sorry to hear that Tom... are we not allowed to agree with people?

For what it's worth I do appreciate your validation sn; - by Andrea
What is a sale, what is agreement
What is work, what is achievement
What is motivation, what do we pursue
What is it of life's lessons that we accrue

Some people stress, some people shine
Some people motivate, others only whine
Some sales are borne of attitude
Some sales are finessed with aptitude - by rattus58
rattus58 you sure can rhyme
Is it something that you do all the time?

I especially like the rhymes that pertain to sales
That kind that help close "killer whales"

Keep the thoughts a comin' ... don't stop now
People are hungry for your know-how

How about an ode to guys like Tommy Boy
One of the best sales movies you'll ever enjoy - by Dave Tear
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