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What are you pushing?

This is a great website. I really hope to come away from this discussion with a clear answer to my selling challenge.

I jumped into real estate this year and started out working in the listing department exclusively. My job has been to list homes. I have done very well selling our listing service and now I have been moved up to working in the sales department exclusively.

Here is my challenge. When I was working with sellers I was selling our listing service which amounted to selling people on the idea that they were better off with my solution than their current solution. That is a very clear proposition (I acquired that term here thmbp2;). I don't see a very clear proposition to sell our customers once we are looking at homes.

What I have been told so far is that my job is to tune in to what they want and need then find and show those homes. I can do that, no problem but what am I selling, all of those homes? Am I suppose to sell the customer on why they should buy each home that I show them? - by Vito
I don't know, but as sales professionals, you fit the buyer with the product, so in real estate, isn't your job to match the income, the resources, the geography, family size, hobbies and avocation with the client.... I mean I'd like a sturdy gambrel in my garage to skin my deer from for example.... :) It'd be your job to dig that out.

Aloha.... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Thank you Rattus. I only show the homes that match what the customer wants or needs. MY challenge is that I am not seeing a clear proposition to sell once we are looking at those homes. Does that make sense? - by Vito
A home is where you can "scratch where it itches." Your role is to help the buyer discover all the reasons they want to buy the home. Make it their idea. Ask questions....

Is this beautiful backyard what you had in mind when you said you wanted a place for the kids to play and also to entertain your friends?

Is this jetted tub with the view out the back of the house what you had in mind when you said you wanted a place to unwind after a long day? - by jdedwa11
A
Thank you Rattus. I only show the homes that match what the customer wants or needs. MY challenge is that I am not seeing a clear proposition to sell once we are looking at those homes. Does that make sense?
If I understood the term proposition it would.... sn;

I know that there are many wonderful programs out there, but one that helped me "process" my sales, is Action Selling. The thing about it that helped me the most was the understanding of a commitment objective, and steps one negotiates towards the final agreement with the client and your review of what went right or wrong.

Where this process helps, is that it encourages questioning of what one does. Who, what, when, where, how, how many and what esle?

If for example in my own case, you should be questioning me about what I do, like, want and desire. I would tell you that I love to shoot. I love to fly. I love fast cars. I'd tell you that my dad was a craftsman and I would have loved to be as good as he was. I like to have my wife make hunting clothes for me, I pour lead and make bullets, I have three dogs and three cats... do I like gardening, no.. my wife does... and once you know all this, you can find out what in each house you show meets some of the desires I have... a place to hang deer... a place to make bullets, a shop, a garden.. a three car garage....

This is what action selling has done for me... only I use it to figure out what YOU do and where would any insurance products I manage have application for you.

I tend to ramble.... :)

Aloha.... :cool: - by rattus58
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If I understood the term proposition it would.... sn;
Tom, I think you're looking for a deeper meaning of the term proposition than it requires. I use the term proposition frequently because I believe it is critical to a selling situation.

Take a look, for instance, when a newcomer comes here to ask for help with an opening, presentation, or script. The first thought that comes to my mind in each case is What's the proposition? If you, can't detect it, no amount of feathering or finesse can save it. - by Ace Coldiron
A home is where you can "scratch where it itches." Your role is to help the buyer discover all the reasons they want to buy the home. Make it their idea. Ask questions....

Is this beautiful backyard what you had in mind when you said you wanted a place for the kids to play and also to entertain your friends?

Is this jetted tub with the view out the back of the house what you had in mind when you said you wanted a place to unwind after a long day?
Do you recommend I do that for EVERY home? Please assume that all of the homes I show the customer are something they would be more than happy to own. - by Vito
Tom, I think you're looking for a deeper meaning of the term proposition than it requires. I use the term proposition frequently because I believe it is critical to a selling situation.

Take a look, for instance, when a newcomer comes here to ask for help with an opening, presentation, or script. The first thought that comes to my mind in each case is What's the proposition? If you, can't detect it, no amount of feathering or finesse can save it.
It's the term proposition by itself that I'm having to get familiar with. What's your proposition? What are you selling? What's your proposition? What are you recommending? What's your proposition? What is it you're selling? Has that about got it?

Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
It's the term proposition by itself that I'm having to get familiar with. What's your proposition? What are you selling? What's your proposition? What are you recommending? What's your proposition? What is it you're selling? Has that about got it?

Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg
Tom, do you remember Frank Bettger's most famous case? They actually made a dramatized movie about it with Bettger playing himself.

The prospect had five proposals for life insurance on his desk all for the purpose of obtaining an important loan from a bank with himself, the borrower insured and the lender to be the beneficiary. The loan approval was critical.

Each one of those proposals was from a good company, and the product in each case was insurance.

Bettger came in last (from a referral I believe). The prospect tried to discourage him from even bothering.

But Bettger came in with a Proposition. He pointed out that if the prospect suddenly became ill, the whole loan could go up in smoke while he was "contemplating" which proposal to accept. Bettger had pre-arranged an appointment with the only doctor in Philadelphia whose report alone, after a physical exam took place, was acceptable by an insurance company without a second examination.

That was the Proposition. The differentiator. The separator. The OFFER. Bettger came with SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT of critical importance rather than just laying a sixth proposal on the guy's desk. - by Ace Coldiron
Bettgers approach to that particular client was astute.

The term proposition for me by itself, and remember that I'm not all that quick, was hard for me to grasp as a concept. As you illustrated with Bettger, however, his proposition (solution, move to action, disturbing the client) was more than just a simple solution or proposition, and that probably is why I had/have trouble with the term by itself, because, like in the case of Bettger, it actually is a whole story...

1) 5 illustrations/proposals = focused on premium
2) 5 Illustrations/proposals = New Yorks finest companies
3) Loan in the balance
4) Qualify for coverage

Bettger/Client still had these issues. A loan, a physical, and an offer by the company. Bettger realized the one thing that all of the others knew, but didn't focus on. They focused on what MOST agents seem to focus on... PREMIUM. Bettger realized that like most quality companies, the net result is going to be similar between them, he was an unknown, they were presumably known to the client, and he needed to distinguish himself.

We don't know all of the conversation with Bettger, but being a pretty straight shooter, he went to the bottom line, all the paper in the world won't mean anything if you can't get insured. If this is the "proposition" I can understand it, but it is a lot more involved than just a "proposition". That is probably why I have trouble with it by itself, what is the story behind it? This is MY FAILING, not the term.. sn;

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Mr. Coldiron if you were in my position what would you do? I am already showing the customer only the homes that match their wants and needs especially price, location, floorplan and everything else that is important to them so please assume that they will like them all. What proposition could I sell? - by Vito
Am I suppose to sell the customer on why they should buy each home that I show them?
No.

You are supposed to sell them on why they should do business with you. Once you do that, YOU will be on the receiving end of WHATEVER home they purchase.

In the words of the great real estate salesperson, Danielle Kennedy, "If we can strike a harmonious chord between us...."

In this scenario, YOU are the proposition overall.

BUT, that said, it's up to you to find a value that would fill their wants and needs. Once they realize that you are working for them, you become one with the value that you find for them. In other words, the proposition grows legs, as will your client list I promise you.

The top real estate people do not sell the features and benefits of a particular piece of property. They EXAMINE the features and benefits alongside the prospect, and work to find a fit between those components and the needs and wants of the prospect. - by Ace Coldiron
Thank you for taking my question Mr. Coldiron.

I only show customers the homes that match their wants and needs especially price, location, floorplan and everything else that is important to them.

I only show homes to customer's who have signed a Buyer's Broker Agreement, that's why I refer to them as customers, so they have already decided for whatever their reasons, let's assume it is because they trust, believe and respect me, that they wanted to work with me.

With those two components in place I still feel like something is missing. I feel like I should be selling something. - by Vito
Let me ask you a question... what are your clients looking for? Do you know? What do your clients do with their lives? Do you know? Who are your clients? Do you know?

My son made me so proud today when I asked him to stop by one of our clients... and he said... Dad... what would be my commitment objective? Dang..... What is YOUR commitment objective?

My son spent 2 hours with a new client today. My son took two hours of notes on what this guys does, and he has SO MUCH information now that the property casualty agent I've got him being mentored with was stunned, asking him... "you mean he just gave you this information?" This is a guy with a $3,000,000 book. Questions Rule.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
Let me ask you a question... what are your clients looking for? Do you know? What do your clients do with their lives? Do you know? Who are your clients? Do you know?
"Yes" to all of your questions. - by Vito
I think you need to maybe find ways to relate what they do, want, desire... etc.. to what you're demonstrating, I think Tommy Hopkins used to say.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
Hi Vito...

I'm not in real estate sales however I've purchased a home and I can tell you who got my business. It was the agent who was prompt, worked with my schedule, was patient with me (we saw at least 20 places before we made our mind) he always made me feel like he was on my side and he was working for ME.

Having said that. I think that it is key that you tune in not only to the practical terms of the purchase such as (budget, number of rooms, square footage, etc) I think you also have to connect to them on a psychological/emotional level. In other words... what kind of life do they want to live... what kind of "feeling" do they want their home to have... you have to try and get into their heads and see if you can show them a home that matches their higher needs (i.e. not just shelter)

A show that came to mind is "Say yes to the Dress" It's about a high end wedding dress store in NY that books brides to come in and try on dresses. The show focuses more on the sales process and it talks about them having a huge inventory of dresses but a limited amount of time with the bride. So the seller has to tune in well with the bride so she can pick a dress the bride will like. A wedding dress is a highly emotional purchase as can be a home.

What I'm trying to get at is that you have to actually find them a home they might actually buy. That is your job, IMO. - by Andrea
What I'm trying to get at is that you have to actually find them a home they might actually buy. That is your job, IMO.
Thank you Andrea for your response. I do understand that point which is why I said, "Please assume that all of the homes I show the customer are something they would be more than happy to own." in an earlier post. - by Vito
I will add... we ended up buying a home we had originally said NO to. It was a condo. We picked it appart and while it met some of our basic needs (location, budget, size) we didn't like other things like how it smelt and that there was no window to the bathroom or kitchen, (for natural ventilation) Those were all practical needs. It met our higher needs. It was a penthouse (status) Had an awesome view (status/pleasure) it had a huge deck (awesome for entertaining) Interestingly enough we had not made those requests in our original wish list but that home struck a chord in our need for luxury/status/social life (something we had not considered ourselves)....

I fell in love with the home because of the deck and I came back to our realtor and told him we wanted to make an offer... luckily it worked out. We were so happy with the purchase :D

You gotta do that too... address their practical (lower needs) but tune in to their higher needs too...kwim? - by Andrea
I do understand that point which is why I said, "Please assume that all of the homes I show the customer are something they would be more than happy to own." in an earlier post.

Someone's missing something somewhere here.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
Thank you Andrea for your response. I do understand that point which is why I said, "Please assume that all of the homes I show the customer are something they would be more than happy to own." in an earlier post.
I'm sorry Vito but I think I would disagree with you... sure they would be more than happy to own all but the will not own them all... they can only buy ONE. And it has to be the "right" one. you have to help them find "the One". All houses are NOT equal. One will be outstanding above the rest for whatever reasons.

Maybe it will be the view.
Maybe it will be that it's north facing.
Maybe it will be the hardwood floor.
Maybe it will be that it can be a fixer upper.
Maybe it will be the pool in the back.
Maybe it will be the country charm of the home.
Maybe it will be the front yard that reminded them of the one they grew up in.

Whatever it is... something(s) about the house will HOOK them. Find the hook. Help them find THE ONE. - by Andrea
You can disagree with me Andrea. I don't mind. :)

Please understand that I realize they can only buy one home. Please also understand that many customers buy a home that during the initial showing wasn't "the one".

The idea that if you just put the right product in front of the buyer they will buy sounds great but doesn't reflect what happens on the street. - by Vito
You can disagree with me Andrea. I don't mind. :)

Please understand that I realize they can only buy one home. Please also understand that many customers buy a home that during the initial showing wasn't "the one".

The idea that if you just put the right product in front of the buyer they will buy sounds great but doesn't reflect what happens on the street.
Vito... In ALL DUE RESPECT, no one said, has said that if you JUST put the right product in front of a buyer they will buy it.

Andrea went to a great discertation to spell out a buyers process, and it wasn't saying you place the right home in front of them they will buy.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
Vito... In ALL DUE RESPECT, no one said, has said that if you JUST put the right product in front of a buyer they will buy it.
No harm no foul. thmbp2; - by Vito
Please assume that all of the homes I show the customer are something they would be more than happy to own.
That is hardly a realistic assumption from someone who said "The idea that if you just put the right product in front of the buyer they will buy sounds great but doesn't reflect what happens on the street."

I doubt that even the best real estate people out there "on the street" show only houses that the customer would be "more than happy to own."

And according to your post, you're new to this.

All too familiar--this thread. Real familiar. - by Ace Coldiron
That is hardly a realistic assumption from someone who said "The idea that if you just put the right product in front of the buyer they will buy sounds great but doesn't reflect what happens on the street."
Why would you say that? I don't understand.

I doubt that even the best real estate people out there "on the street" show only houses that the customer would be "more than happy to own."
I think you are wrong about that. I think the best real estate agents find and show the best homes they can which match the buyer's wants and needs. - by Vito
The idea that if you just put the right product in front of the buyer they will buy sounds great but doesn't reflect what happens on the street.
Are you kidding me? That IS what sales is about. Do you think that people end up buying the wrong product? Of course it is a matter of putting the right product in front of them and when many variables are correct they will buy.

The difference is that in your case the "right" product could be a needle in a haystack. IMO in real estate your qualifying skills are going to be crucial, your ability to develop a relationship with them and build rapour, etc. The more you know about them the more you will be able to find the right home for them.

But ok... that's not good enough for you. What you could do then is look for that glimmer in their eye or some signal that they like the house. Like my face light up when I saw that deck... once the realtor knew I was in love with the deck he sold the heck out of it. Sell the sizzle then... look for your buying signal... that will be your selling point (i.e. the hook as per my previous post) then sell on that. Help them visualize themselves living in that home enjoying whatever it is that they liked about the house. Draw out any objections and use your closing skills.

What else do you need? - by Andrea
Vito... don't worry about it... you haven't offended me and you can't go till you respond to my last post to you!! *grin* - by Andrea
I can do that, no problem but what am I selling, all of those homes? Am I suppose to sell the customer on why they should buy each home that I show them?
Every purchase you make in life is for one of two reasons, to gain pleasure or avoid pain. Moving house is an inconvenient and costly affair so if you are presenting, there is a reason they are looking for a new home.

Andrea made a very valid point about placing a heavy focal point on qualifying your customers. I can only assume you work in sales (not lease) and to effectively sell, you need to understand your customer and their buying patterns. This isn't a phone plan or insurance that they can tweak should the deal go sour, this is a major life decision. Most people will only buy one house in their life time. If you gain commission from this job, how much is it... but then think, am I worth this commission? Have I worked hard with this customer to earn this from them?

If it was me in this position, I would meet with my prospects over a coffee and write down everything they are thinking about when it comes to their home. Where they want to live and why, what's important to them, their budget, the size, what kind of yard, how many kids they plan to have... understand your customer. Only then can you create value in your homes... otherwise if you don't understand what is important to your prospects, you'll never be able to link benefits to your customer. Everything will seem like a feature they may not require.

I would only show customers homes that meet their criteria. Potentially I would discuss all my current listings and explain the pros and cons of the properties. Their expectations may change and would like to visit this property... after all, sometimes customers will make the sacrifice for the right offer.

To attempt to sell all your listings to me would only be perceived as a salesmen looking for commission. Reframe your role and put yourself into the customers shoes, enrich and aid their life by recommending homes that suit them and you will be looked at as a value adding professional. When you can do that, you will see more sales and referals.

That's my two cents anyway. I hope that's helped - by MrCharisma
This thread has been closed. - by Jeff Blackwell
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