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Keeping up with the Joneses

How can salespeople utilize "Keeping up with the Joneses" to their advantage in day to day selling? - by Swamprat
Some people have a "need to belong," and their buying behavior reflects this need. "Keeping up with the Joneses" is actually a need to belong...in this case, to the community of "joneses" around them by buying entry into that group. It may be buying the right car, taking the right vacation, or having the right home, or hundreds of other things that help customers feel good about their spending to buy into a formal or informal group.

So I don't think salespeople can "utilize keeping up with the joneses," but they can be aware that the need to blong is a powerful motivator for many of their prospects. Once this need is identified, sell accordingly. - by Skip Anderson
So I don't think salespeople can "utilize keeping up with the joneses," but they can be aware that the need to belong is a powerful motivator for many of their prospects. Once this need is identified, sell accordingly.
Actually the topic is very much engrained in the "pride of ownership" factor among buying motivations. Yes--a salesperson can't get very far without an awareness switch turned on. "Sell accordingly?" It would help to provide an example or description. So here's one. In a sales interview, it helps to allow and encourage the prospective buyer to "assume ownership" in that conversation. The salesperson asks questions and engages the prospect about the use and enjoyment of the product and service. Where the "jones factor" is present, you will often find it entering the conversation. It becomes increasingly difficult for the prospect to "let go" of that assumed ownership.

This is an old thread, and I apologize to visitors that helpful information was so long coming. - by Gary A Boye
Gary

I am glad you brought this subject back. In our business referrals are a huge part of our success. I also believe that keeping up the Jonesís plays a huge part with referrals in our business. I train our staff to ask questions that ask what the referring source has told them. Anything the new client informs me that they were told is important to them and something they want whether it is a product or service that has built their perceived value.

A really good practice with consumers is to ask; how did you find out about us? Then ask a couple more questions to gain information of why it was important to him or her to call me (any person or company). - by rich34232
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