Home > Presentation > Do you believe that the following "rule" should be followed?

Do you believe that the following "rule" should be followed?

It has been said that salespeople should not highlight a feature without describing the related benefit. Do you agree? - by Ace Coldiron
I apologize for the mistake in the construction of the poll question. Don't know how to change it.

Ideally it should read the same as above: It has been said that salespeople should not highlight a feature without describing the related benefit. Do you agree? - by Ace Coldiron
TBFB... Tie Back Feature Benefit.

As you have done your exploration with your client to identify areas that our services or products would apply and are making recommendations, you may run into areas with your client of misunderstanding of why you're making the particular recommendation.

Because you've been taking notes, you can then Tie back to your original conversations in order to remind him of what you uncovered, and the feature you're recommending would have the following benefits for him/her.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
TBFB... Tie Back Feature Benefit.

As you have done your exploration with your client to identify areas that our services or products would apply and are making recommendations, you may run into areas with your client of misunderstanding of why you're making the particular recommendation.

Because you've been taking notes, you can then Tie back to your original conversations in order to remind him of what you uncovered, and the feature you're recommending would have the following benefits for him/her.

Aloha... :cool:
An interesting perspective in its own right, Tom. - by Ace Coldiron
I have some memorable moments of genius (my own that is) when I have devised a feature or two that would be mentioned (in fact deliberately showcased) without alluding the the benefit.

I could leave that poser hanging and wait for responses before I delivered the puchline but...life's too short.

The features in question were always something that would be totally unknown to the prospect and were mentioned 'almost in passing' in order to pique their curiosity.

The psychology is simple enough. If they (the prospect) asked questions about a particular feature (cleverly mentioned for just this effect) then they would always be more interested in the ensuing 'benefit' discussion than they otherwise might have been. - by helisell
If you are doing "needs selling," then every feature you mention has to be a feature that solves the clients problem. Therefore the benefit given must always be followed with "what this means for you . . ." You of course uncover the problem(s) in the investigation stage. In MHO the answer is yes - the rule in valid - by Write4Me
If you are doing "needs selling," then every feature you mention has to be a feature that solves the clients problem. Therefore the benefit given must always be followed with "what this means for you . . ." You of course uncover the problem(s) in the investigation stage. In MHO the answer is yes - the rule in valid
"What this means for (to) you.." is the classic bridge or phrase that ties feature and benefit together.

This forum has so much discussion on why people buy, that one can sometimes forget it's about selling.

YES...that is how you do it. Glad to see it here for what I believe is the first time. - by Ace Coldiron
It has been said that salespeople should not highlight a feature without describing the related benefit. Do you agree?

In my world time is at a premium therefore I will only spend time highlighting features that give my client benefits they are after. Some features don't need a huge explanation of the benefit since it is either obvious or the benefit is not really a priority for the customer. And if that is the case why waste my breath on it? Why distract the customer? why waste their time showing them things that are of no consequence?

So my opinion is to only talk about what will benefit the customer. And then keep the message short and simple to understand. So I will stick to the top 3 benefits because that is usually what they will make their decision on. (at least in my line of work). - by Andrea
Sometimes we in sales have to look at ourselves as the buyer, because we ALL buy.

I'm a sailor. Own a sloop. I know what a roller furling jib is. I know the very important benefits. Convenience and all important safety. Going forward to haul down a head sail can be awkward, cumbersome, and sometimes dangerous.

SO..if I'm looking at a particular sailboat for sale, and I'm told it has the feature of a roller furling jib, you wouldn't think the salesperson would have to go further. BUT....I want to hear those benefits.

And here's something else. It's a rule of selling. Never skip a step. Explaining the benefits IS a step. - by Ace Coldiron
Sometimes we in sales have to look at ourselves as the buyer, because we ALL buy.

I'm a sailor. Own a sloop. I know what a roller furling jib is. I know the very important benefits. Convenience and all important safety. Going forward to haul down a head sail can be awkward, cumbersome, and sometimes dangerous.

SO..if I'm looking at a particular sailboat for sale, and I'm told it has the feature of a roller furling jib, you wouldn't think the salesperson would have to go further. BUT....I want to hear those benefits.

And here's something else. It's a rule of selling. Never skip a step. Explaining the benefits IS a step.
It's a rule of selling. Never skip a step. Explaining the benefits IS a step. This for sure is as important as anything else in sales.

M