Home > Resistance > The Eight Objections

The Eight Objections

I came across a post on another website that read...

When companies and individuals have an objection to making a purchase, it’s one or some combination of the following eight.
... and went on to list the following eight items:
Lack of perceived value in the product or service
Lack of perceived urgency in purchasing the offering
Perception of inferiority to a competitor or in-house offering
Internal political issue between parties/ departments
Lack of funds to purchase the offering
Personal issue with the decision maker(s)
Initiative with an external party
Perception that “it’s safer to do nothing”
What are your thoughts about this statement and the items listed? - by Community Mailbox
In a broad-brush sort of way, I agree. I'm usually the cause of ALL OBJECTIONS.

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
I'm familiar with that list and where it came from. Interestingly it was followed by ten comments by individuals--none of which addressed the list. One person responded that objections are "buying signals." Another said that an objection means you haven't done your job.

WHERE are peoples' minds?

I think the list is informative. In other words, we can't go wrong by keeping that list in mind.

Lately there has been discussion about being able to sell only after we have addressed the internal system issues involved. I would be lying if I said I haven't thought about that more since these discussions have evolved.

My thoughts: Those internal issues break down into three categories. They are Confidence, the Feeling of Contribution by the Players Involved, and The Pain and Gain of the Players Involved.

We often like to add the word "perceived" to things like value, etc,. We really don't need to. Perception rules. - by Ace Coldiron
Kind of an abstract list. I mean think about what "Perceived value" means. Perceived value is subjective and customers and clients don't use ideas like that. They simply say, "I don't want it." And then I usually try to find out why. If they have no need then the sale is off. The buyer thinks in terms of want, like "does the product or service do what they want." As a salesman I think of value in terms of making an offer. It comes from the seller's side. I don't usually hear clients talking about value when they make objections. - by ToddR
What about a 9th; "A personal issue with the salesperson?"
I have been brought in on a couple occasions to present to a client that was a female and she prefers to buy from a male.

Any thoughts on this one?

E - by edcoon
I came across a post on another website that read...

... and went on to list the following eight items:
What are your thoughts about this statement and the items listed?
This is the classic "inductive" shotgun approach to sales training. That is, collect and list as many individual, separate, and successful experiences as possible, regarding objections, then group them into broader categories (8 in this case) for training, in the hopes that a sales student will find one that works best for him or her.

For someone new, it is a good start but seasoned sales reps know such lists are designed for the personal onslaught of the process of elimination and re-grouping.

Still, if there are 8 categories of objections listed, naturally someone later asks, "where is the 9th reason?" Then where is the 10th--11th--12th...? It can't be helped. That is the nature of inductive thinking.

The fact is, someone can work this list out ad infinitum. How about, "I can't buy a car more expensive than my wife's car." Then many prospects begin interested but are frustrated by the feeling of being "rail-roaded" into something he or she does not want even after saying so.

These are solid real objections that few would ever see on a list. We do have here the category "personal issues" which however, is far too broad and actually encapsulates them all.

For me, all advice like this works and none of it works because it will be transmuted by both the experienced sales rep and the casual listener.

A deductive approach is very different. You begin first by knowing as much about the prospect as possible on a deeper level. Seasoned sales people here do this intuitively without much thought. Then the objections can often become predictable. These same seasoned reps often formulate the overcoming before hearing the objection.

I wish I had a dime for every time I walked onto a car lot and no one asked me even what type of car I was driving! No, they start in with their so transparent scripts, that I cut just short of ignoring them altogether.

Although we will change our minds (thinking), we cannot change our identity (way of being) which starts the deductive process.

People always behave in conformity to their perceived sense of self. The successful sales rep listens to the self beneath the prospect's verbal and body languages and delivers to that single need.
- by John Voris
When you are selling a product that is expensive and typically has a longer sales process (not an impulse buy), Your primary objective is to discover the prospect's pain (the true or core objection) prior to your presentation. Once that has been discovered, then you must help the prospect determine the level of pain. Once this has been done, then your presentation should be short and directed to providing a pain solution or prevention.

If an objection raises its ugly little head prior to pain discovery, then you must consider it and the next two subsequent objections to be simply smokescreens. You better not try to handle smoke. Dig for the 4th objection (the real pain) deal with it then present and close. - by triadtraining
When you are selling a product that is expensive and typically has a longer sales process (not an impulse buy), Your primary objective is to discover the prospect's pain (the true or core objection) prior to your presentation. Once that has been discovered, then you must help the prospect determine the level of pain. Once this has been done, then your presentation should be short and directed to providing a pain solution or prevention.

If an objection raises its ugly little head prior to pain discovery, then you must consider it and the next two subsequent objections to be simply smokescreens. You better not try to handle smoke. Dig for the 4th objection (the real pain) deal with it then present and close.
What happens when there is no pain?

In door-to-door cold call selling, no one had pain prior to me walking through the door but they certainly had their list of objections.

Overall, prospects seemed to have objections as they were being compelled toward a desire, just as when they were being repelled away from "pain." - by John Voris
What happens when there is no pain?

In door-to-door cold call selling, no one had pain prior to me walking through the door but they certainly had their list of objections.

Overall, prospects seemed to have objections as they were being compelled toward a desire, just as when they were being repelled away from "pain."
That provokes thoughts.

John, where might impulsive behaviour fit in door to door scenarios, in your opinion. I have always cited the Girl Scout/Cookie engagement in order to reduce examples to a common denominator.

Same question to Triadtraining. - by Gary A Boye
Gary,

Good insight. I would imagine most door to door sales are lower ticket items, therefor, true prospects may have little or no pain.
If in fact this is the case then what is the best strategy in handling objections. My suggestion would be to isolate the first objection in order to discover the real or core objection. Once the core objection is discovered, it can be understood through good questions, verified and then handled through product knowledge or value question techniques. I would not try to do this last step with the first objection unless I have isolated it. Tying to answer the first objection without isolating, in the majority of cases will only result in another objection that needs to be isolated. There are exceptions to this as there are to most things in sales. But if you will isolate the first objection then you can handle the next one which should lead to a sale if you have a qualified prospect.

If you have an expensive item for sale and you are unable to uncover pain, you may be either dealing with a suspect or your pain discovery process is incorrect or delivered incorrectly. - by triadtraining
By first objection, do you mean primary objection?

P.S. I'm going to start a thread soon titled Yes, No, or Maybe. I think you could add valuable insight. - by Gary A Boye
That provokes thoughts.

John, where might impulsive behaviour fit in door to door scenarios, in your opinion. I have always cited the Girl Scout/Cookie engagement in order to reduce examples to a common denominator.

Same question to Triadtraining.
Studies show there are gradations of thought intensity between "thought provoking" behavior and "non-thought provoking behavior," that guides our purchasing activity.

Buying Girl Scout cookies bypasses the rational thought provoking processes, for there is no logical criteria sufficient to justify any prospect's decision--making it impulsive. People are motived here by the pure feeling of altruism.

This explains why children can "sell" the cookies and a professional sales rep is not necessary to influence the prospective cookie buyer as there is no logic to appeal to. It is 100% feeling.

Door-to-door salespeople therefore, must sell to the real or artificially created "feeling" of desire first, followed by appealing to their reasoning to satisfy the prospect's ego needs.

When making other purchasing decisions, the prospect's feelings generates the rational criteria from which to justify the later decision. Here, the sales rep engages in this rational aspect of the prospect first, that eventually enables him or her to access their core motivating feeling.

I found this perspective essential to generate my best prospect to sale ratio. - by John Voris
Gary,

When I say first objection, I am referring to the first objection the prospect has after the presentation. When you say primary objection, I think you are saying the same as the real or core objection. Am I correct?

I look forward to your Yes, No, Maybe Thread.....I will try to keep my language insightful. Have a great day!

To John, I agree, there is only emotion when it comes to buying...logic only comes in after the sale. Your door to door insights are on target. Appealing to positive emotions will produce better results in door to door sales....with negative emotions producing results indirectly proportional to larger ticket items.
I am confusing myself......door to door (low ticket) go for positive emotional approach. High ticket items (face to face by appointment) discover and cure the emotion of pain or pain prevention.

Hope this helps, please ask questions for clarification. - by triadtraining
Hello all.

I think there is an actual killer objection in home improvement sales.
" your the first we've seen(allways?) and we will get 2 others and decide from there.

Whatever you say they are adament.


Through maybe experience or too many watchdog programme they will not decide there and then.

The one call close is dying and I actually wonder whether its all over from a commission only in house salesman?:un - by smashy
Hello all.

I think there is an actual killer objection in home improvement sales.
" your the first we've seen(allways?) and we will get 2 others and decide from there.

Whatever you say they are adament.


Through maybe experience or too many watchdog programme they will not decide there and then.

The one call close is dying and I actually wonder whether its all over from a commission only in house salesman?:un
What you have described does not constitute an objection. It is a condition of satisfaction.

One call closes are alive and well in that field for salespeople who know how to set the stage.

One way to transcend the condition you describe is to say up-front: "What do you know about our company that makes you want to do business with us?"

Now you have material to work with. This is advanced, I realize, but we try and present advanced ideas on SP to help less experienced people deal with common areas of so-called resistance. - by Gary A Boye
......... I only know about your advert in the paper.Your the first price weve had.

Come on gary ,keep em coming. - by smashy
......... I only know about your advert in the paper.Your the first price weve had.

Come on gary ,keep em coming.
We don't role play here, but I have a question for you. WHY would somebody say it's the first price they have HAD if I haven't given them a price yet?

From my last post (please read again):
One call closes are alive and well in that field for salespeople who know how to set the stage.

One way to transcend the condition you describe is to say up-front: "What do you know about our company that makes you want to do business with us?"
Selling is not about giving estimates. Price is one factor in competitive environments. The experience you provide the prospect in consulting with you will most often override the "condition of satisfaction" element of comparative "shopping." It can work for you or against you, depending on the quality of experience you provide.

Conditions of satisfaction should be uncovered upfront. - by Gary A Boye
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.