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What Have You Learned

There are frequent references on this forum to various books on selling, and sales authors.

I wonder if anyone would like to share and describe anything specific (thoughts, methodologies, strategies, and techniques) from these books that he/she has learned, and used. - by Ace Coldiron
I'm in the process of "action selling" right now this morning and don't have much time to expound, but staying in an organized process has definitely helped me.

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
My success in selling comes primarily from two personal strengths. One of those strengths is an ability to think and act strategically in business.

Gary Gagliardi, author of The Art of War The Art of Sales, has taught me much and reinforced what I had learned on my own--often the hard way.

In his book he says
"You must use standard approaches in making contact with the prospect.
Your creativity wins the sale."
Opening a selling opportunity with tactics is like trying to open a chess game with tactics. Novices in both areas do it. Strategy demands that we lay the groundwork first.

When you learn and understand things like that, and then have your thoughts and overall awareness reinforced by a someone like Gagliardi, it is very empowering. In this economy--in ANY economy--and in the competitive arenas I have played the selling game in, empowerment is what is needed. - by Ace Coldiron
In that small space of words you've concentrated a life time of thought and experience into a post that could explode in a multitude of directions given an attentive mass of people willing to tap into what you've posted with their own understandings, confusions, and questions.

There's some groundwork that might open up something more if people are willing, Ace.
-----------------
"Strategy demands that we lay the groundwork first." - Ace

It's my nature to spend time in study and thought laying internal groundwork first, after, and along the way. Opening a selling opportunity begins with that ground work I described empowering my entry into the empowerment of the person I'm seeking to find out from if a selling opportunity exists or not.

Thoughts?

MitchM - by MitchM
I'm not being facetious... what are you saying?

Are you saying there could be dozens of different learnings that could be posted? That everyone may have something different to contribute?

"Strategy demands that we lay the groundwork first." - Ace

I understand this to a small degree. I read it as be prepared. Ace probably reads it as something else.

"It's my nature to spend time in study and thought laying internal groundwork first, after, and along the way. Opening a selling opportunity begins with that ground work I described empowering my entry into the empowerment of the person I'm seeking to find out from if a selling opportunity exists or not." MithcM.

Ace commented not long ago that he missed you, and from my perspective, its probably because he understands what you're saying. This isn't a slander... it's I'm a very simple person and I have to read what you say several times before I get an IDEA of what you're saying, I'm still not for sure.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
I'm not being facetious... what are you saying?

Are you saying there could be dozens of different learnings that could be posted? That everyone may have something different to contribute?

"Strategy demands that we lay the groundwork first." - Ace

I understand this to a small degree. I read it as be prepared. Ace probably reads it as something else.

"It's my nature to spend time in study and thought laying internal groundwork first, after, and along the way. Opening a selling opportunity begins with that ground work I described empowering my entry into the empowerment of the person I'm seeking to find out from if a selling opportunity exists or not." MithcM.

Ace commented not long ago that he missed you, and from my perspective, its probably because he understands what you're saying. This isn't a slander... it's I'm a very simple person and I have to read what you say several times before I get an IDEA of what you're saying, I'm still not for sure.

Aloha... :cool:
Tom, I believe your quest for understanding of the things you encounter, and your desire to contain that understanding in simple terms, is a very real strength you possess. I say that because you often provide great insight on this forum--and contribute much.

I also have to read Mitch's words a few times. Here's my take.

I think Mitch values the "groundwork" within. In other words, he is a staunch believer in what he does and in the opportunities and products he offers. I think what he is saying is that without that internal groundwork within (belief), he could not be effective in engaging outward with potential buyers and prospective partners.

I also think that Mitch avoided the simple "You have to believe in what you do." in order to address and honor what I posted about strategy and to acknowledge he understands and relates.

Anxious to hear from Mitch if I'm close. - by Ace Coldiron
The sad part is that so few of us are willing to post "what we have learned." - by Ace Coldiron
Tom, I believe your quest for understanding of the things you encounter, and your desire to contain that understanding in simple terms, is a very real strength you possess. I say that because you often provide great insight on this forum--and contribute much.

I also have to read Mitch's words a few times. Here's my take.

I think Mitch values the "groundwork" within. In other words, he is a staunch believer in what he does and in the opportunities and products he offers. I think what he is saying is that without that internal groundwork within (belief), he could not be effective in engaging outward with potential buyers and prospective partners.

I also think that Mitch avoided the simple "You have to believe in what you do." in order to address and honor what I posted about strategy and to acknowledge he understands and relates.

Anxious to hear from Mitch if I'm close.
Hi Ace... Thank you for your kind words.... :)

I agree that more could/should be contributing in order that we actually get to benefit by their "collective" experiences... my big word for the day.... sn;

Much Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Ace youu are always close!thmbp2;

I also have to read Mitch's words a few times. Here's my take.

I type fast and click - sometimes obscurity is the result. Or it's how I think at the time. - Mitch

I think Mitch values the "groundwork" within. In other words, he is a staunch believer in what he does and in the opportunities and products he offers. I think what he is saying is that without that internal groundwork within (belief), he could not be effective in engaging outward with potential buyers and prospective partners.

That is true as well as ground work being: 1. product/business knowledge; 2. human psychology/relationship knowledge; 3. potential customer knowledge. - Mitch

I also think that Mitch avoided the simple "You have to believe in what you do." in order to address and honor what I posted about strategy and to acknowledge he understands and relates.

I hadn't thought of it like that BUT Ace my thought was to post directly to your words and as such respect them - pay honor - as I always do. What you post for me offers an environment of possibility and analysis - hence growth - which is always food for thought. - Mitch

Anxious to hear from Mitch if I'm close. Yup. - Mitch

Ace you got me thinking about the Art of War a few years ago and that became one of my studies - it seems to me you can't spend enough time in understanding strategy and all the implications, etc.

At the same time you have to act along the way with the best you have going at the moment which if you are attentive to shoule be your best teacher.

Always, the best to you.

Mitch - by MitchM
Ace you got me thinking about the Art of War a few years ago and that became one of my studies - it seems to me you can't spend enough time in understanding strategy and all the implications, etc.
Mitch
The treatise, Bing-fa, which has been popularly translated, and referred to as The Art of War, is the definitive work on the art of strategy and it applies to all areas of competition. Sun Tzu's principles are perfectly adaptable to selling as well as countless other areas of life.

If one could fully grasp just the first and fourth chapters, and how they can apply to selling, they alone could carry you through a very successful career in sales. - by Ace Coldiron
Thanks, Ace - I'm headed there now.

Question: as much as you've studied and with your years of experience, do you continue to discover new depths or applications, associations and uses for what you uncover from The Art of War, etc.? Or is it all pretty much integraged and on cruise control now?

MitchM - by MitchM
Thanks, Ace - I'm headed there now.

Question: as much as you've studied and with your years of experience, do you continue to discover new depths or applications, associations and uses for what you uncover from The Art of War, etc.? Or is it all pretty much integraged and on cruise control now?

MitchM
It's a profound and life long study. In practice, integrating the principles is an act of volition, not a conditioned reflex per se.

In evaluating sales and/or marketing ideas I do filter everything through a question, "Is it strategically sound?" I also evaluate specifically the invulnerabilty of an offer, a plan, a presentation, a proposition, etc. If I "lose" a sale, it will not be by my own hand in so doing. When you combine that with assessing the market, and choosing where I will I focus my efforts, it makes for a very high success rate.

Gagliardi's "translations" in those business areas have had a great impact on my work.

I was also very influenced by the work and philosophy of insurance great David Cowper. All of his stuff passes the "strategically sound" test.

Look closely at Frank Bettger's contributions to sales education, and you will see the same adherence to sound strategy. - by Ace Coldiron
Thanks for your insights, Ace. I cound comment on a couple of things but just this one: "In practice, integrating the principles is an act of volition, not a conditioned reflex per se." - Ace

Integrating the principles as an act of volition, not a conditioned reflex, then keeps it alive and fresh and you alert and attuned to the immediacy of the situation? Correct?

Reflexively there's always a movement toward harmonizing and working with, meeting, etc. the situation yet volition is also at play and yet doesn't reflex sometimes dominate and other times it's in the volition?

When they work together in harmony then you have what - sales bliss?

MitchM - by MitchM
Integrating the principles as an act of volition, not a conditioned reflex, then keeps it alive and fresh and you alert and attuned to the immediacy of the situation? Correct?
That could be. I'm not sure. Actually, although I have a natural tendency to look at the big picture, and that's strategic --the rest I have to think about.

I've known people who have natural strategic tendencies and they aren't even aware of them. To me it was a learning process. It was not originally ingrained in me.

Learning strategy is like learning a new language. It's best acquired in small chunks. Intiende? - by Ace Coldiron
Thanks, Ace. I'm biting off and swallowing small chunks every day.

You give me a lot to think about.

Best to you.

Mitch - by MitchM
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