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Why canít a buyer make quicker buying decisions?

"Why do we treat a purchasing decision as if it were an isolated event, and forget that there is an entire system that holds the status quo in place, and would have to be re-organized efficiently before being ready to make a change?" - Sharon Drew Morgen

Sharon Drew Morgen's latest blog post titled, "Why canít a buyer make quicker buying decisions?" provides a real life example of a system holding the status quo in place. Check it out if you can and come back to this thread and post your thoughts on the topic. - by Jeff Blackwell
I would have liked to have seen a better example than the penny ante decision Sharon Drew gave. Certainly one drawn from a real life situation with her on the selling end and where buying decisions and internal systems have to be managed.

Instead I found myself wading through no less than six (count them) references to the money she makes and several public disses of a particular computer manufacturer who apparently had made her grumpy. Pure coincidence that one of that company's major competitors (IBM) has been her client.

I would like to hire her accountant, however, because I always was told that equipment expenditures were written off over a period of years as depreciation which would make that internal system issue relatively trite as an example for us to ponder.

I just today received my copy of SD's new book. She gets a lot of promotion on this site and I hope she will be eternally grateful to Jeff who in my opinion has done more for the cause of sales education than any ten sales gurus combined.

Can't wait to read the book and express my views, good, bad or indifferent. If I do a better job selling myself on her stuff than she has done selling me on her stuff, I will share with everybody the internal system issues I had to "buy into" for that to happen. - by Ace Coldiron
I have read Sharon's books and seen her videos. I think that some of her concepts have merit, but they are basic. She simply repackages and presents what most of us already know. However, what she excels at is telling you about an idea, without ever telling you the idea. - by Harold
I have read Sharon's books and seen her videos. I think that some of her concepts have merit, but they are basic. She simply repackages and presents what most of us already know. However, what she excels at is telling you about an idea, without ever telling you the idea.
;bg "what she excels at is telling you about an idea, without ever telling you the idea" - by rattus58
I agree with Ace on the blog.

I can say with confidence the majority of my clients do nto spend due to having too much money and needing to spend the money.

I do agree that we are required to discover the motive behind a buying decision. What is it that drives them to own at this time and why would they buy. - by rich34232
"Think about the last purchase you made. What criteria did you use to make the purchase? Choose the product and/or vendor? Choose the time of purchase"?

( motive for buying) "And, the biggest reason of all for which I need no rationale, I need to spend some money for my end-of-year, or pay Uncle Sam, and I’d rather pay myself".

" I wouldn’t have bought one if not for my accountant".

I had so one say that I was way off base with my reply. These are quotes from the article.

This is why she is in buying mood and how she felt about the impending change.
- by rich34232
Rich, Sharon Drew states: "Before buyers can buy, they have to figure out how to manage their internal, behind-the-scenes systems issues, and make sure any purchase/change fits into the system without major disruption."

She does not give an example of successful management of those issues. I'm still not sure if she tried to manage them. But in any event, disruption followed and she shared her poor experience on the blog.

I would much rather see an example of successful management of those behind-the-scene issues, particularly from one who describes the necessity.

Perhaps the Mac salesperson was supposed to take the lead on that and show her how to manage those issues, but the purchase was made without that happening. - by Ace Coldiron
I agree that I would have loved to see an example.
The question is;Why can't a buyer make quciker decisions?

Discovering the reason why people are in a buying mood helps the sales professional gain the sale.In this case Sharon Drew was asked to spend money and that is the sole reason to purchase.

The need= to spend money
The want= trinkets

The sales person is required to show her what she wants and let the need of spending money take over. I guess facilitating the need to spend money was accomplished. - by rich34232
I guess facilitating the need to spend money was accomplished.
True. But what part did the salesperson play in managing the internal system issues? At this point I see none. So I would suspect it's an isolated example. There are people here, myself included, who have walked through that door and led the way to resolving an organization's internal system issues so that a purchase could be made. Rich, I am sure you have also. I speak for myself when I say that it is an important topic.

Strangely, the topic is almost holographic. I believe that for many salespeople to accept the concept being discussed, their own internal system issues would have to be resolved. Examples of those issues might be the conflict with what we have been taught, conflict with our status quo, conflict with what our employers expect us to do, or even a perceived lack of credibility regarding the author. All of those things can be very real and very active.

My own opinion is that there is terrific value to this topic. For many, that value will start to emerge with the realization that the buying cycle and the selling cycle are separate things. The FULL value will manifest when the interconnectedness shows its face in a way that the salesperson knows which step to take next. In the discussions so far, we are not there yet.

I think there is something missing; I think I know what it is. At this point, and until this topic grows legs, I don't want to bring it up. - by Ace Coldiron
It is hard to grow anything when a seed doesn't germinate. In the case of knowledge, there has to be understanding. Now I realize that I do this more than anyone, but I am also constantly reminded that to be brilliant, others have to know why, and why comes from understanding.

The problem with being in maybe the lowest percentile here, is that much of what is said might as well for me, be in chinese.

For example, what are you saying here "Strangely, the topic is almost holographic. I believe that for many salespeople to accept the concept being discussed, their own internal system issues would have to be resolved. Examples of those issues might be the conflict with what we have been taught, conflict with our status quo, conflict with what our employers expect us to do, or even a perceived lack of credibility regarding the author."

Are you saying sales people may be conflicted by change? Are you saying that there is resistance to change when something new is offered? When you say a topic is "holographic" what did you mean ... since a holograph is a reconstructed image from what I know of it.

Aloha ... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
Are you saying sales people may be conflicted by change? Are you saying that there is resistance to change when something new is offered? When you say a topic is "holographic" what did you mean ... since a holograph is a reconstructed image from what I know of it.

Aloha ... Tom :cool:
I'm saying that the same cycle of "buying in" to a solution offered by a seller which is dependent on internal system issues being resolved could exist for salespeople who must resolve internal issues before they can accept change represented by something new being offered.

By holographic--an analogy--I mean the phenomenon can exist in more than one place as we discuss this topic.

We ALL are buyers--and that includes the buying of ideas. For me to accept SD's concept, I would need to resolve some issues that exist internally first. One such issue may or not be my personal tendency to consider the source--something I was taught when I was very young.

I'm using myself as an example as Sharon Drew used herself in her blog. But I think my example is better. - by Ace Coldiron
I'm saying that the same cycle of "buying in" to a solution offered by a seller which is dependent on internal system issues being resolved could exist for salespeople who must resolve internal issues before they can accept change represented by something new being offered.
I'm still not sure I've "got it" yet, but I'm thinking that you're saying that buyers have to overcome their fear of making a wrong decision by accepting what we as salespeople offer them, and that we as sales people may have a resistance to changing our behavior or sales methods if we are offered something new by someone outside our general or typical realm of influences.

Am I close? I hope you've enjoyed the last few days with your families and friends... we've still a lot to be thankful for.

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
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