Pitch?

I was wondering if anyone could think of a good pitch for me. The one I have now is definately too long. I have a coupon book where I try to get small businesses to put a coupon in it and then I send out 50,000 copies to businesses for customers to take for free. The problem is that I have to sell these things to business owners right in there business, and they usually don't sit me down and talk to me, but they talk to me right there, sometimes in front of customers. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas. - by ttdub
I was wondering if anyone could think of a good pitch for me. The one I have now is definately too long. I have a coupon book where I try to get small businesses to put a coupon in it and then I send out 50,000 copies to businesses for customers to take for free. The problem is that I have to sell these things to business owners right in there business, and they usually don't sit me down and talk to me, but they talk to me right there, sometimes in front of customers. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas.
Good morning...

There are lots of good ideas that many of the gentlemen/ladies have on this site, but most of them will probably ask you to lay out your presentation to these potential clients to evaluate you process.

One thing for sure, I would not be calling it a pitch, regardless of what it is.

Much aloha :cool: - by rattus58
Yep, Tom's right - what's your current presentation like? - by MarcEnriquez
Something yoou have to do at first is the rapport, so your prospect can trust you. - by CECILIA HERNANDEZ
Your opening pitch must accomplish three things:
1. Develop Trust
2. Develop Credibility
3. Show Value

1. Develop Trust
In the few seconds you have, you of course cannot develop a deep trust but you can develop enough trust so that the prospect will listen to you. The easiest way to do that is to convey from the very beginning that you've given the prospect permission to say 'No'. For example, "I don't know if this is a good fit for your business and if it's not just tell me."

2. Develop Credibility
All it takes is a sentence to mention the value a similar business - maybe even a competitor - received from using your product.

3. Value
What's in it for them. "I'd like to show you a product that can bring you 100 new customers a week, just like it did for XXX" - by DaveB
Your opening pitch must accomplish three things:
1. Develop Trust
2. Develop Credibility
3. Show Value

1. Develop Trust
In the few seconds you have, you of course cannot develop a deep trust but you can develop enough trust so that the prospect will listen to you. The easiest way to do that is to convey from the very beginning that you've given the prospect permission to say 'No'. For example, "I don't know if this is a good fit for your business and if it's not just tell me."

2. Develop Credibility
All it takes is a sentence to mention the value a similar business - maybe even a competitor - received from using your product.

3. Value
What's in it for them. "I'd like to show you a product that can bring you 100 new customers a week, just like it did for XXX"
1. It is more important to IDENTIFY conditions of mutual trust and respect than to develop them at this early stage.
2. It takes more than a sentence to develop credibility. What you DO, not what you say, is what's important.
3.Your prospect cares about himself, not XXX. Also, he doesn't care about what you'd "like". If you want to show something, then ASK PERMISSION. Why is it so many people miss that? - by Ace Coldiron
1. It is more important to IDENTIFY conditions of mutual trust and respect than to develop them at this early stage.
2. It takes more than a sentence to develop credibility. What you DO, not what you say, is what's important.
3.Your prospect cares about himself, not XXX. Also, he doesn't care about what you'd "like". If you want to show something, then ASK PERMISSION. Why is it so many people miss that?
Ok, not to be "pitching" Action Selling, this is the process that we've adopted most recently. This process entails/incorporates questioning of the client to find out who he is, what he is, what he does, what he uses, and how he goes about doing his business,including how and what's involved in the way business decisions are made regarding your products and services, and if you are involved with products or services that your client uses/needs and whether or not he is using a competitors products, how he uses that product and if he doesn't use your or anothers product or service, how does he manage without your product or service.

That's exploration. During this process you can identify areas that your product or service might benefit this client. You are then able to review and recommend ways that your product or service would fit, fix, enhance, and benefit your client, and through these discussions, tieing back to exploration discoveries if necessary, to come to agreement that certain suggested courses of action would suit your clients desire to benefit by your offering.

Anyway... it's something like this that we've adopted in our office.
Exploration
Indentification
Recommendations
Agreement(s)

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
I agree that you shouldn't come with the mindset that you're pitching or selling at this point. Instead, you probably want to have a set of questions that probe to see if any problems exist that you can solve, or if they are trying to get results that you can produce.

What value have you brought to your past customers? Did they improve their sales within a certain segment of the market? If so, you might ask the customer 'are you trying to attract new customers from the Magnolia neighborhood?' If they say no, then ask them where they are trying to improve their presence. If they say yes, then tell them an example of how you've done this for other customers. The one prerequisite to this approach is that you understand the value you bring to your customers and are able to demonstrate that. Only demonstrate it once you know what value the customer is looking for. - by goodselling
1. It is more important to IDENTIFY conditions of mutual trust and respect than to develop them at this early stage.
2. It takes more than a sentence to develop credibility. What you DO, not what you say, is what's important.
3.Your prospect cares about himself, not XXX. Also, he doesn't care about what you'd "like". If you want to show something, then ASK PERMISSION. Why is it so many people miss that?
Ok Ace, I see we will have to be standing on the same lily pad to make this work.
The perspective I am working from here is that our sales pal needs to discover people that will be interested in his coupon business, has a limited opportunity to do so and in poor conditions many times for an ideal selling environment. All prospecting is about discovering people interested in what we have while simultaneously managing their defenses and building a relationship.

Some salespeople push beyond the customers interest and I believe are doing a disservice to not only themselves but the whole field of professional selling. Still, if you ask a whole roomful of people who they think of first when they hear the word salesperson, the overwhelming and rather derogatory response is used car salesman. It is because so many sales people ignore the customers agenda early on and push their agenda onto the customer. This is promoted by business owners who don't really understand sales regularly and messes up the corporate sales effort.

To open a conversation with any new prospect, the sales person is obligated to explain what their purpose is. This is commonly referred to as the value proposition but has a hundred different names beyond. At the same time, recognizing a buyer may be defensive about the agenda the sales person is on, giving that prospect/buyer some kind of simple permission to say no reduces the defensive emotional energy in the moment long enough for the buyer to consider, if he/she is prone to, the value to themselves of the value proposition. If the buyer sees any value in the value proposition to themselves, they will want to know that the seller is at least credible enough to spend any time moving further. If not, they disconnect from the sales cycle, often without really letting the seller know right away. This will waste the sales persons time so knowing sooner rather than later has value to the sales person.

In this opening moment, as in ANY new relationship, the 3 elements that will make it work will always be Trust, Credibility and Interest. As you go down the road with the buyer you will develop a far greater sense of all three elements but you will maximize the short moment if you build them in from the very beginning.
Trust comes from simple understanding by the buyer that you will not overrun them with your sales agenda.
Credibility comes from a very simple reference to happy and hopefully recognized customers
Interest is solely based on the buyers interest in your value to him.

A simple question as asked for in the original post will cover all 3 with something like,
"The reason I stopped by was to discover whether the coupon structure I have used to generate revenue for the X, Y, & Z would bring you as much new business as it has them. I wasn't even sure if you would want to take on new business so I thought I would simply ask you."

Permission to say no is in the last sentence, Credibility is in reference to current customers X, Y & Z, and interest is in the value proposition "new revenue." The whole thing is said in less than 20 seconds and whatever comes out of the buyers mouth next tells you their level of interest or likelihood to buy.

While there are a hundred roads to Indianapolis, there is one that is best suited for what I am trying to accomplish. In this sales environment, I am quite comfortable this will work well. You can take a different road if you like but recognizing Trust, Credibility and Interest will never be wrong.

This by the way comes from a process called the Solomon Sales Platform developed by a guy who isn't well known on the national stage yet but will be.

Regards,
Dave B - by DaveB
Ok Ace, I see we will have to be standing on the same lily pad to make this work.
The perspective I am working from here is that our sales pal needs to discover people that will be interested in his coupon business, has a limited opportunity to do so and in poor conditions many times for an ideal selling environment. All prospecting is about discovering people interested in what we have while simultaneously managing their defenses and building a relationship.

Some salespeople push beyond the customers interest and I believe are doing a disservice to not only themselves but the whole field of professional selling. Still, if you ask a whole roomful of people who they think of first when they hear the word salesperson, the overwhelming and rather derogatory response is used car salesman. It is because so many sales people ignore the customers agenda early on and push their agenda onto the customer. This is promoted by business owners who don't really understand sales regularly and messes up the corporate sales effort.

To open a conversation with any new prospect, the sales person is obligated to explain what their purpose is. This is commonly referred to as the value proposition but has a hundred different names beyond. At the same time, recognizing a buyer may be defensive about the agenda the sales person is on, giving that prospect/buyer some kind of simple permission to say no reduces the defensive emotional energy in the moment long enough for the buyer to consider, if he/she is prone to, the value to themselves of the value proposition. If the buyer sees any value in the value proposition to themselves, they will want to know that the seller is at least credible enough to spend any time moving further. If not, they disconnect from the sales cycle, often without really letting the seller know right away. This will waste the sales persons time so knowing sooner rather than later has value to the sales person.

In this opening moment, as in ANY new relationship, the 3 elements that will make it work will always be Trust, Credibility and Interest. As you go down the road with the buyer you will develop a far greater sense of all three elements but you will maximize the short moment if you build them in from the very beginning.
Trust comes from simple understanding by the buyer that you will not overrun them with your sales agenda.
Credibility comes from a very simple reference to happy and hopefully recognized customers
Interest is solely based on the buyers interest in your value to him.

A simple question as asked for in the original post will cover all 3 with something like,
"The reason I stopped by was to discover whether the coupon structure I have used to generate revenue for the X, Y, & Z would bring you as much new business as it has them. I wasn't even sure if you would want to take on new business so I thought I would simply ask you."

Permission to say no is in the last sentence, Credibility is in reference to current customers X, Y & Z, and interest is in the value proposition "new revenue." The whole thing is said in less than 20 seconds and whatever comes out of the buyers mouth next tells you their level of interest or likelihood to buy.

While there are a hundred roads to Indianapolis, there is one that is best suited for what I am trying to accomplish. In this sales environment, I am quite comfortable this will work well. You can take a different road if you like but recognizing Trust, Credibility and Interest will never be wrong.

This by the way comes from a process called the Solomon Sales Platform developed by a guy who isn't well known on the national stage yet but will be.

Regards,
Dave B
I think your methodology will work, as do other methodologies---and that's a good thing. I disagree with your premises, as I've stated--and not just because it is one more bulleted list in a field overrun with them. However I'm sure there are many people out there on the national stage whose premises I disagree with. I know what works for me and I know what sells coupon programs because one of the businesses I share ownership in has become very successful in that industry. WE use a different methodology and we look at the trust and respect issues with a very experienced eye. - by Ace Coldiron
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