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do you use selling techniques?

What im asking in the title is Do you Use Techniques when you sell like do you think to your self im gona try this techninque on this customer or do you just go with the flow? Personally I just go with the flow As in i dont think to my self of any Techniques but do work on the customer to swing my way deepands on the person. But i would like to hear others do you go with the flow and just use your own ways or do you use Techniques? - by Sanddollar
Please provide an example of such a "technique". - by Agent Smith
for example like the "Pain Funnel" which i read on this Forums. Giving this Example some one knowing this Technique would you in moment of an intrview sale etc...think of technique to use? - by Sanddollar
What im asking in the title is Do you Use Techniques when you sell like do you think to your self im gona try this techninque on this customer or do you just go with the flow? Personally I just go with the flow As in i dont think to my self of any Techniques but do work on the customer to swing my way deepands on the person. But i would like to hear others do you go with the flow and just use your own ways or do you use Techniques?
Going with the flow is a technique. Done with skill, it can be strategically sound. When you say techniques, are you sure you don't mean tactics? If so, it would depend on the tactics, your overall philosophy of sales, and your personal selling strategy.

I don't probe pain. Instead, I probe risk, or more appropriately stated--loss. - by Gary Boye
I don't probe pain. Instead, I probe risk, or more appropriately stated--loss.
Is "loss" similar to "consequences"? - by Agent Smith
Is "loss" similar to "consequences"?
Risk and loss can be consequences - certainty and gain can be consequences. - by MitchM
Risk and loss can be consequences - certainty and gain can be consequences.
Can you give an example of probing for "loss'? - by Agent Smith
Is "loss" similar to "consequences"?
Loss is a form of consequence. Risk really is not. It is something you do that can effect an outcome (consequence). For an example--and to show the impact of both in a sales discussion, take a classic life insurance situation--buy-sell funding.

Most people don't harbor a daily awareness of their own mortality in spite of the fact that we all die and could die at any time. If you had a business partnership that both partners owned equally, in the event of a partner's death, the surviving partner would often want to own the entire business. However, if funds were not readily available to pay the deceased partner's estate for his/her interest--the business could be destroyed by stalemate or legal battles.

Okay--the risk is obvious--and many partners live under that risk. Risk doesn't destroy after all. Consequences destroy. The consequences (the loss of everything one has worked for) of not having funding (which life insurance could provide) could be devastating.

Probing the loss in the above scenario is a matter of examining existing buy-sell agreements, or lack thereof (worse yet) and determining the inadequacy of current funding--and then presenting the anticipated loss (consequences).

I chose a life insurance example because of its proximity to the concept of risk. Examining risk won't sell policies. Examining loss does. However, I could probably give an example of probing loss in almost all segments of selling. Think about the loss of market share a retailer could experience by not investing in a new product line that has been supported by major national advertising. - by Gary Boye
However, I could probably give an example of probing loss in almost all segments of selling.
Gary I purchase distressed residential properties from Banks and then turn around and sell those properties on the open real estate market. If I was working with a prospective buyer how would you suggest I probe the loss? (I'm trying to wrap my mind around this.) - by Agent Smith
Gary I purchase distressed residential properties from Banks and then turn around and sell those properties on the open real estate market. If I was working with a prospective buyer how would you suggest I probe the loss? (I'm trying to wrap my mind around this.)
Yes--I knew what you did from a previous post and it had crossed my mind as to how the topic would relate to your work.

In the area in which I live (WNY), cost of housing is remarkably lower that most areas of the country. So--my frame of reference is from people in the real estate business who I know and from several others that do what you do for a living. Locally, a big part of the market for reselling acquired distressed property is young couples looking for "starter homes". The people I know who buy and sell distressed property seem pretty sharp with regard to people skills. Most of them are also handy and they invest in fixing up the property and often do some of the work themselves. Like other successful real estate people I know, they seem to have a bond with their clients bordering on friendship to the point of sometimes playing a confessor role.

What they have shared with me is that the bricks and mortar factor in changing living quarters is secondary to the life changes that are both symbolized and symptomatic in the process.

So--with that said--I'll share one example in the context of your question about loss. A large percentage of young buyers of starter homes are lame duck buyers. What I mean is that they require help in funding the purchase. Much of the help comes from parents and in-laws. Let me digress by saying that a psychiatrist friend of mine once told me that, when it comes to family, the "cost" of help is often extremely high.

As a result of players in the game, the underlying drama of family dynamics, and specifically, existing roles of family members, play a part in these transactions. For instance, the change in relationship between father and daughter upon the daughter's marriage is a significant event in a man's life. As a father, I can testify to that. The help, often in dollars or participation in financing, often is tied to a natural desire for parents to sustain some type of patriarchal or matriarchal role. As a result, parents or in-laws often play a part in the buying process.

With that in mind, consider that the perceived loss (or unwelcome change) of those existing family bonds or roles can play a large part in the willingness of all concerned to make a deal happen. The parent must be heard and empathized with in these cases. The perceived loss of his/her role exists. Resistance on their part must bear risk in these cases. With that on the table, once probed, but not voiced, empathy and cooperation with these background decision makers will generally bear positive results for the seller.

That is one example drawn from my circle, and, perhaps the only one I can give you because I am not in real estate. But I do know that my description of family influence and dynamics is accurate. - by Gary Boye
But I do know that my description of family influence and dynamics is accurate.
I agree that family dynamics can play an important role in any deal.

Thank you for the example. :) - by Agent Smith
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