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Do you believe this to be true about buyers?

What are your thoughts about the following:
Most buyers ask the wrong questions. They do that because they don’t know the right questions.
- by Gary A Boye
What are your thoughts about the following:
Most buyers ask the wrong questions. They do that because they don’t know the right questions.
What is a "buyers wrong question?" If the buyer asks the wrong questions, shouldn't the sales person look in his toolbox for the right questions.. or actually maybe that's a skill now... but whatever... What is the salesguy doing?

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
Could be a good topic. - by Ace Coldiron
What are your thoughts about the following:
Most buyers ask the wrong questions. They do that because they don’t know the right questions.
Great observation Gary and so true. We all have to start somewhere. - by Jeff Blackwell
It seems to me that we have to define what the "right" and "wrong" questions are. We have:

1. Questions that the prospect asks, presumably because they're important to the prospect (or maybe because they don't know what else to do, or they're bored). These are "the right" questions from the prospect's perspective.

2. Questions that the salesperson wish the prospect would ask, because the salesperson thinks those are the key questions that the prospect should want answered. These are the "right questions" from the salesperson's perspective.

3. Questions that both the prospect and the salesperson want to be asked and answered. These certainly are "the right" questions.

4. Questions that would be helpful to be asked and answered, but are not on the radar screen of either the salesperson or prospect. These are the right questions, too.

Having said that, I agree with the spirit of your question, Gary. I think the answer is probably "I believe this to be sometimes true."

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
It seems to me that we have to define what the "right" and "wrong" questions are. We have:

1. Questions that the prospect asks, presumably because they're important to the prospect (or maybe because they don't know what else to do, or they're bored). These are "the right" questions from the prospect's perspective.

2. Questions that the salesperson wish the prospect would ask, because the salesperson thinks those are the key questions that the prospect should want answered. These are the "right questions" from the salesperson's perspective.

3. Questions that both the prospect and the salesperson want to be asked and answered. These certainly are "the right" questions.

4. Questions that would be helpful to be asked and answered, but are not on the radar screen of either the salesperson or prospect. These are the right questions, too.

Having said that, I agree with the spirit of your question, Gary. I think the answer is probably "I believe this to be sometimes true."

Skip Anderson
When someone has a real need, like a broken waterline, or toilet or stove, something YOU have to fix and haven't fixed before and are looking for answers and instruction as to what to buy, how it works, how it installs are in my opinion the "right kind of questions".

Questions that advance understanding of the product or process between seller and buyer are to me the right questions.

Much Aloha.... :cool: - by rattus58
Isn't it my responsibility to guide the client to ask the proper questions and then answer the questions?

My person opinion is the only wrong question is the one that is not asked. - by rich34232
I met such case as well.Sometimes maybe the buyer is not the guy who use it. - by heweimei
Buyers don't ask good or the right or important quesitons because they don't know what to ask - they have limited understanding of things. I did terrible research until I turned 50 then I began researching so I could buy with some answers and questins ready.

When a seller begins to ask me great questions trying to understand what I want first I'm very attentive hoping this is the place to buy.

MitchM - by MitchM
In my experience, there are only two reasons customers ask questions....(1) they don't know, and they want to know if you know, and (2, more likely) they know...they want to know if you know. Not knowing, and being forthcoming about it, does not diminish your credibility, but B.S'ing them does. - by David Mack
In my experience, there are only two reasons customers ask questions....(1) they don't know, and they want to know if you know, and (2, more likely) they know...they want to know if you know. Not knowing, and being forthcoming about it, does not diminish your credibility, but B.S'ing them does.
A third and common reason is that they are "coached" or "programmed" by others in their life, past or present, who have given them questions to ask. For that reason, many questions are out of context. It is important for those who are learning sales to be aware of that common behavour. A study of transactional analysis can help. - by Gary A Boye
They ask the questions they "think" they should ask.

These are mostly just rituals that have evolved as customers 'wised up' to pushy salepeople who have a reputation for ripping people off.

Want an example?

Customer buying a used car asks 'how many previous owners?'

The actual answer doesn't really matter (I mean in reality it doesn't matter....the car could have had 5 extremely thoughtful and careful owners....or just 1 owner who abused it every day)

So the answer deoan't really matter but ritual dictates t