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Mastering the Science of Sales

From your experience, in what way is sales a science? - by Community Mailbox
From your experience, in what way is sales a science?
That's a great question.

My answer is that it is only a science as observed consciously by those who would have chosen to be scientists in that field of study.

I would say Neil Rackham (SPIN SELLING) would be in that category. Also, less than a handful who post here. Among some other "trainers". perhaps Morgen, Werth, and the late David Sandler. That doesn't mean that their conclusions have been necessarily correct--only that they have taken a scientific approach through a form of scientific method--deductive and inductive so to speak.

Some poeple might think that so-called "principles" of selling validate it as a science. But most principles are arbitrarily chosen.

Most people practice it as a job. A smaller segment practice it as an art. - by Gary A Boye
I think we are using the term 'science' loosely, but I've often referred to the approach taught to me by my sales mentor, Michael Goodman, as 'science'.

It is a science in that there are immutable truths and that certain practices or activities produce repeatable results.

Is it art or is it science? Some in this profession are artists. They were born with talents that make them great. Being great at something that is primarily an artistic endeavor is something that cannot be achieved via training. I will never be a great painter or musician.

So for what it's worth, it's a science because you can train someone to be a great sales professional. - by DaveB
So for what it's worth, it's a science because you can train someone to be a great sales professional.

Dave Barnhart
Do you believe, Dave, that a person who is not gifted as an artist in sales could then only achieve greatness in sales through someone else's training?

I have another question, solely as inquiry. It has to do with your use of the word "great." Seldom do other professionals who are successful enjoy the label of great. For instance, accountants, bankers, engineers, programmers, tool and die makers, plumbers, county clerks, nurses, etc., etc.

Why that pedestal? - by Gary A Boye
Do you believe, Dave, that a person who is not gifted as an artist in sales could then only achieve greatness in sales through someone else's training?

I have another question, solely as inquiry. It has to do with your use of the word "great." Seldom do other professionals who are successful enjoy the label of great. For instance, accountants, bankers, engineers, programmers, tool and die makers, plumbers, county clerks, nurses, etc., etc.

Why that pedestal?
I know great pilots.... that is because they make repeatable good landings. I know great shots, because they make repeatable good scores... basketball, baseball, there are lots of great professionals. I've no idea why you've centered on this. Great demands individual achievement.. great leader, someone who stands out in their field.

However, it's hard to be great when you're part of a collective. The professions you've mentioned don't lend themselves real well to "greatness" and UNIONs won't permit it, involved with many of the professions you suggest.

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
Do you believe, Dave, that a person who is not gifted as an artist in sales could then only achieve greatness in sales through someone else's training?

I have another question, solely as inquiry. It has to do with your use of the word "great." Seldom do other professionals who are successful enjoy the label of great. For instance, accountants, bankers, engineers, programmers, tool and die makers, plumbers, county clerks, nurses, etc., etc.

Why that pedestal?
To answer your first question, Gary, If I am not naturally gifted then I am not going to get to the top via sheer determination. Determination AND some training are required.

To answer your second question, we tend to use the word "top" instead of "great", don't we? - by DaveB
Does anyone have examples of certain sales practices or activities that produce repeatable results that would qualify "Sales" as a "Science"? - by Jeff Blackwell
I've no idea why you've centered on this.
I will tell you EXACTLY why I have brought that topic up.

There is an inordinate amount of people who visit SalesPractice, introduce themselves enthusiastically with aspirations about getting help in their new career, putting food on the table, paying their bills, and building a career in sales. They don't get training in sales at school, their employers offer little help, and they need guidance so they can further their lives. And they LEAVE this site in a matter of days--disappear into the woodwork. As another highly repected member has stated, it