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Cold call approach

Well I'm not sure if it's called this but whatever it's called when you walk into a business cold. The approach I use is very simple and I feel has worked for me. But I'm interested in how and what you guys use.

Just for the scenerio, lets say I'm selling printer paper and I have a deal where I can come in 30% lower than what they're paying now. My approach would be something like this.

1. Walk in and ask if there's a manager or owner available.
A. If there's resistance I usually just introduce myself and tell them what I can offer, possibly trying to get the managers name and take a card to call later.
B. If the manager/owner comes out or is the one I'm talking to then I give my pitch.

2. Hi, my name is __ ___ with __ __ we deal with __ __. Are you currently being service (what I ask with my current window cleaning biz). But this would change offering a product you know they are already buying. (very interested in hearing your guys)

3. If they say no thanks or they're satisfied with what they have sometimes I will leave a card but more times I just save the card and time and rush to the next business. I never try and talk them out of it, or deliver more pitch. I just think it's a waste of time and not only that but strikes a nerve. Nothing wrong with saying "thank you for your time, have a good day, then rush on to one of the next million businesses out there"

4. If they are interested then I usually quote them out or with selling a product I'm not sure what I'd do. I guess I'd fill out a quick quote sheet taking their info and what they use, then contact them with pricing later. Unless of course I have the prices then "which probably isn't going to be the case". What do you guys do?

I'd appreciate all input whether you feel your pitch is good or bad.

Thanks in advance,

Justin - by Justin Time
I think it's good. It states your value proposition, gives them permission to say 'no', and demonstrates credibility. - by DaveB
The first thing I'm curious to know is that, is price always a driving factor for why business owners choose XYZ printer paper?

I'd love this to be more of a conversation rather then a presentation. Getting the business owner involved. The last thing he wants is to think he had made a bad decision and coming in hard with your 30% discount might give me a perception of a lesser quality paper.

Another addition would be validating the office girl. She is the Director of First Impressions and has the power of letting people see the boss and stopping you before you start.

"Sorry to bother you ______, my name is _______ and I'm from the ______. How has your day been so far? The reason I'm hear is I might be able to save your company some money (if you're checky and confident you might say "and hopefully to help you with a raise"). Can I ask who is the boss in your establishment? I won't take much of his or your time, is it possible to see him now or shall I make an appointment for a time that suits you better?" - by MrCharisma
In general I think you have a good approach.
Myself I like to be a little more interesting in my opening statement. I agree that you shouldn't spend to much time on someone that isn't interested, but if you don't catch their interest at once, they will never be interested.

I try to do something unexpected or just ask a easy question like; Do you wish your window cleaning service would be more effective and cheaper at the same time?

That way I always get a way in and a fair chance to present my product. - by LookingDaniel
Do you wish your window cleaning service would be more effective and cheaper at the same time?
I think asking questions like this is great. It catches people's attention.

Another approach you can use is by getting the owner more involved. Get them talking more. You can do this by finding out more about who they are and what they're using and how it's working out for them.

Just say something like, "Hi, My name is _____ from _____ . I know you weren't expecting me soi I won't take too much of your time. I'm here today because I want to save you ___ on your ______(product or services). I'm confident I can help you out. What service are you using right now? ..... [ FROM HERE GO INTO PROFILING and then present your product and how it can save them money]." - by Faizalnisar
It is usually a great idea to note down the idea of the receptionist / tel atttendant, because the next time you visit them ot make a call, you can address the person (gate keeper) by name, which always softens them up. - by sranade
The first thing I'm curious to know is that, is price always a driving factor for why business owners choose XYZ printer paper?

I'd love this to be more of a conversation rather then a presentation. Getting the business owner involved. The last thing he wants is to think he had made a bad decision and coming in hard with your 30% discount might give me a perception of a lesser quality paper.

Another addition would be validating the office girl. She is the Director of First Impressions and has the power of letting people see the boss and stopping you before you start.

"Sorry to bother you ______, my name is _______ and I'm from the ______. How has your day been so far? The reason I'm hear is I might be able to save your company some money (if you're checky and confident you might say "and hopefully to help you with a raise"). Can I ask who is the boss in your establishment? I won't take much of his or your time, is it possible to see him now or shall I make an appointment for a time that suits you better?"
I'm very surprised your introduction is so negative! Door-to-door cold calling is not like working out of a home base.

When you say "Sorry to bother you," you are already placing yourself beneath the prospect, telling him or her that you are an intrusion.

"I might" be able to save you money? This is just another negative comment that also says "I may not."

"How has your day been so far?" Maybe his or her last call was from a creditor. Maybe he or she had a fight with the spouse. This is also "filler' language such as a grocery clerk asking, "how are you?" No one really wants to know. Since it is filler, the prospect knows you're in sales and the walls of resistance start going up.

"Can I ask?" This is another subservient comment. The person your talking to might be a narcissist who likes nothing better than to say "no."

"I won't take much of his or your time, is it possible to see him now or shall I make an appointment for a time that suits you better?"

More negative jargon and does not resonate someone who is excited with what he does but is an apologist.

If I hired you, it would be because I would feel sorry for you.

As a window cleaner, his intro should be short and sweet. There's not a lot to negotiate. IMO he has it handled. - by John Voris
Well I'm not sure if it's called this but whatever it's called when you walk into a business cold. The approach I use is very simple and I feel has worked for me. But I'm interested in how and what you guys use.

Just for the scenerio, lets say I'm selling printer paper and I have a deal where I can come in 30% lower than what they're paying now. My approach would be something like this.

1. Walk in and ask if there's a manager or owner available.
A. If there's resistance I usually just introduce myself and tell them what I can offer, possibly trying to get the managers name and take a card to call later.
B. If the manager/owner comes out or is the one I'm talking to then I give my pitch.

2. Hi, my name is __ ___ with __ __ we deal with __ __. Are you currently being service (what I ask with my current window cleaning biz). But this would change offering a product you know they are already buying. (very interested in hearing your guys)

3. If they say no thanks or they're satisfied with what they have sometimes I will leave a card but more times I just save the card and time and rush to the next business. I never try and talk them out of it, or deliver more pitch. I just think it's a waste of time and not only that but strikes a nerve. Nothing wrong with saying "thank you for your time, have a good day, then rush on to one of the next million businesses out there"

4. If they are interested then I usually quote them out or with selling a product I'm not sure what I'd do. I guess I'd fill out a quick quote sheet taking their info and what they use, then contact them with pricing later. Unless of course I have the prices then "which probably isn't going to be the case". What do you guys do?

I'd appreciate all input whether you feel your pitch is good or bad.

Thanks in advance,

Justin
After cold calling for over 20 years, I have learned that the introduction must be short. You have only seconds to lay the groundwork that leads to a sale.

IMO you have it right. Sales is not magic--its hard work and tenacity. I like how you race to the next prospect and not dwell on the "no."

The only suggestion I may have is to focus on dirty windows first, then clean ones. That process improves cold-call efficiency.
;bg - by John Voris
John, sometimes you have to pull apart some bad advice in order to display the difference between what works and what will work against you. I believe you did an excellent job in doing exactly that when you revealed the serious flaws in Mister Charisma's suggestions.

I agree that Justin had put together a workable approach and I'm pleased that you encouraged him on that. - by Gary A Boye
Lots of people have different approaches to the 'cold call or walk in'....but you have to learn if they even have a need for what you offer -- before you discuss what your product/service can do for them. Working to learn some valuable information from the front desk or receptionist can go a long way to move the opportunity along, if there is an opportunity at all. It can also prevent wasting time. - by Paulette Halpern
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