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Modern Selling Skills

What would you characterize as Modern Selling Skills? - by Community Mailbox
it is interesting to me that modern selling skills uses a word that seems really old fashioned. doesn't the word "modern" sound like something that introduced us to black and white television. however it is still current. similarly quality,service, and price(in that specific order) never change. poor quality=no sale. poor service=nosale .low price with poor quality and service=no sale.i would always keep this as a "modern" selling approach. improve the quality of your sales skills every day. improve the service that you can provide you customers every day. pricing will always find its own level. - by larry ferguson
Modern selling skills, i.e., those which are new, are almost 100% driven by changes in distribution of products and services that continuously evolve, and which require additional skills to manage and facilitate the movement of those products and services.

For instance, those skills taught in SPIN selling emerged as complex selling in our business environment increased.

Some of those skills include change management, the ability to work in team situations, and the ability to present more complex products.

People skills have not changed as much and it would be very difficult to realize your potential without them. - by Gary A Boye
I would characterize 'Modern Selling Skills' as recognizing (paraphrasing Cluetrain Manifesto here):

"People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information from each other than vendors. There are no secrets. The networked market knows more that you do about your own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone."

'Modern Selling Skills' means participating in those online conversations not with your sales hat on, but with your consultant's hat on. - by DaveB
I would characterize 'Modern Selling Skills' as recognizing (paraphrasing Cluetrain Manifesto here):

"People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information from each other than vendors. There are no secrets. The networked market knows more that you do about your own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone."

'Modern Selling Skills' means participating in those online conversations not with your sales hat on, but with your consultant's hat on.
Interesting perspectives.

Why do you agree with "The networked market knows more than you do about your own products?" It would seem to be a very hasty generalization when you consider that the degree or level of product knowledge would vary greatly among people who sell. - by Gary A Boye
Interesting perspectives.

Why do you agree with "The networked market knows more than you do about your own products?"
I agree with it because personal experience has confirmed it over and over.

Case to point: I bought a new dishwasher. I went to an appliance store. This was not a big-box store or a large chain. The salesman could not tell me the differences in features between to models of dishwasher. And this was a Bosch dishwasher.

It is true that there are shopkeepers and sales people that know their stuff. When I find them I tend to buy exclusively from them. - by DaveB
I agree with it because personal experience has confirmed it over and over.

Case to point: I bought a new dishwasher. I went to an appliance store. This was not a big-box store or a large chain. The salesman could not tell me the differences in features between to models of dishwasher. And this was a Bosch dishwasher.

It is true that there are shopkeepers and sales people that know their stuff. When I find them I tend to buy exclusively from them.
It would seem to me that the dishwasher salesman is not representative of professionals who sell. If Watts Wacker was referring to that salesman as the "you" in the quote, I guess it would be correct. But having read the book, when he said "you"--meaning me the reader, he simply dialed a wrong number. By hasty generalization, I mean he should not try to speak for all of us. - by Gary A Boye
But having read the book, when he said "you"--meaning me the reader, he simply dialed a wrong number. By hasty generalization, I mean he should not try to speak for all of us.
I've pulled Cluetrain down off the shelf to get the actual text:

"People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information and support from one another than from vendors."

and

"There are no secrets. The networked market knows more than companies to about their own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone."

Obviously those are generalizations. Also, keep in mind that Cluetrain was published ten years ago, and was the result of three gifted futurists peering into the future and telling us what they thought the future would look like.

Still, I would challenge you Gary (respectfully of course) that the collective knowledge held by all your past, present, and future customers about your product or service exceeds your own. There are probably dozens (hundreds?) of unique, imaginative, and clever ways people have used your product that you are not aware of. Also, very few companies have a true picture of what the public truly thinks of them and their products.

Case to point: I'm working with a large regional medical imaging company right now. These guys are the to