Home > Education > What Do You Think About This Remark?

What Do You Think About This Remark?

Over coffee last week, a friend remarked that he believed that in order to learn success in selling, it is a great help to study failure and the often hidden reasons behind it.

Thoughts? - by Gary A Boye
I agree to a point. It's important to learn where we went wrong, but success is based more on confidence, and over-analyzing our mistakes often has the opposite effect. - by Phateless
Analyzing mistakes and failure syndromes to uncover underlying negative and self defeating conditions is one of the most confidence producing things you can do.

The question "What's missing?" doesn't begin with "What's there?" for a good reason: what's missing is the cause of failure.

Then comes, "Also, what do I believe I am doing well?" is important.

The best of 2010 to you.

MitchM - by MitchM
I agree to a point. It's important to learn where we went wrong, but success is based more on confidence, and over-analyzing our mistakes often has the opposite effect.
I did not say our own failures--I said failure. - by Gary A Boye
Analyzing mistakes and failure syndromes to uncover underlying negative and self defeating conditions is one of the most confidence producing things you can do.

The question "What's missing?" doesn't begin with "What's there?" for a good reason: what's missing is the cause of failure.

Then comes, "Also, what do I believe I am doing well?" is important.

The best of 2010 to you.

MitchM
,
Mitch, "success" is often spoken about as a commodity. Why can't we address failure that way? As I said to the other member, I'm referring to failure as such--not specifically our own.

Do you agree with the remarks that my friend made while we were having coffee? Does it help greatly to study the causes for failure in selling as a tool for determining the reasons for success?

Certainly you have seen others fail in your trade. - by Gary A Boye
Thanks, Gary - you always help me focus - I personified "failure" to me, myself and I.
---------------------
Mitch, "success" is often spoken about as a commodity. Why can't we address failure that way? As I said to the other member, I'm referring to failure as such--not specifically our own.

Do you agree with the remarks that my friend made while we were having coffee? Does it help greatly to study the causes for failure in selling as a tool for determining the reasons for success?

Certainly you have seen others fail in your trade.
------------------
Yes it does help greatly to study the causes of failure in selling as a tood for determining the reasons for success, Gary, unless my immediate reply is missing something subtle yet to be uncovered.

For example, if one of the causes of failure is not talking with enough people with precision and clarity, then to personify that to myself I ask: Am I communicating with enough people with precision and clarity?

What say you, Gary?

MitchM - by MitchM
Thanks, Gary - you always help me focus - I personified "failure" to me, myself and I.
---------------------
Mitch, "success" is often spoken about as a commodity. Why can't we address failure that way? As I said to the other member, I'm referring to failure as such--not specifically our own.

Do you agree with the remarks that my friend made while we were having coffee? Does it help greatly to study the causes for failure in selling as a tool for determining the reasons for success?

Certainly you have seen others fail in your trade.
------------------
Yes it does help greatly to study the causes of failure in selling as a tood for determining the reasons for success, Gary, unless my immediate reply is missing something subtle yet to be uncovered.

For example, if one of the causes of failure is not talking with enough people with precision and clarity, then to personify that to myself I ask: Am I communicating with enough people with precision and clarity?

What say you, Gary?

MitchM
Mike, Stephen Covey's words, "Seek first to understand, then to be understood." have been profoundly valuable to me. I believe it applies to when we talk to ourselves and address our own needs, too. Think of my coffee klatcher's remarks in that vain. In other words, when we understand root causes of failure, we can much better avoid them in our own lives. - by Gary A Boye
Gary
I learn more from studying my failure. I am not sure what hidden reasons are. Most of the time when I do fail it is obvious why I failed. Once I take the time to discover why, I then can name quite a few points that I missed during my process that helped me to fail.

When I have trained others or have had ride along with others they seem to have difficulty understanding or discovering where I have failed. As an example I visited with an older client who lived two condo units down from the unit where the work was needed. The client arrived on a scooter and I asked him to come in with me. I went to the problem area and noticed him walking with a heavy limp. While in the home I explained how I do an inspection of the home and asked him to follow me around the unit.
I priced up the solution and asked this client to come in the home and sit at the table where we would be comfortable. My solution covered all the details the basic repair, complete rebuild and a replacement. The client said this is too high and I asked how much too much. He said he was willing to pay a couple hundred dollars. My basic repair was 325. The complete rebuild was closer to 500 and a replacement was 900.

I did my rapport building, relationship building and giving value prior to the price and solution presentation. The client would not budge. When we left I ask the person who did the ride along what I did wrong. He said nothing the old guy was a cheap *******. This made me laugh and it had nothing to do with the client being cheap.

Here is what I did wrong and where I could have been better.
I was later than our agreed time and he did not receive a phone call that explained I would be running late. His time was not valued by our comp