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The Sandler Rules

I'm curious how many members of this sales community have read The Sandler Rules: 49 Timeless Selling Principles and How to Apply Them. - by Gary A Boye
I have not.

MitchM - by MitchM
I have not.

MitchM
Super post, Mitch! Thanks for sharing. - by Gary A Boye
lol - I know - I answered the question didn't I. No one else has been so bold to say yes or no!

MitchM - by MitchM
lol - I know - I answered the question didn't I. No one else has been so bold to say yes or no!

MitchM
At this point I'd take a maybe.

But seriously, the reason I asked the question is because that book had gone to number one ranking among business books at Amazon in less than a week. So maybe the question behind the question is do people who search sales education on Amazon differ from people who visit here--and vice versa? Over the years I would say that there is not that much book discussion on SalesPractice.

I grew up in a publishing family and I think that hardwired my predisposition towards the printed word. I certainly don't believe everything I read, of course. I did read the Sandler Rules book and I personally would give it a high score. Author, btw, is David Mattson. - by Gary A Boye
Hi Gary
I have not read the book but I will now.Thanks for your advice.

Positive Regards - by salesdog
At this point I'd take a maybe.

But seriously, the reason I asked the question is because that book had gone to number one ranking among business books at Amazon in less than a week. So maybe the question behind the question is do people who search sales education on Amazon differ from people who visit here--and vice versa? Over the years I would say that there is not that much book discussion on SalesPractice.

I grew up in a publishing family and I think that hardwired my predisposition towards the printed word. I certainly don't believe everything I read, of course. I did read the Sandler Rules book and I personally would give it a high score. Author, btw, is David Mattson.
I am certainly aware of Sandler but prefer this venue over such texts.

I also think you hit a very insightful correlation between your expereince here, with the lack of book discussions, and the popularity of Sandler with the public at large and the sales success rates between both camps.

For me, these books and courses all tend to generate a one-size-fits-all mentality. They form a single model from which to draw rules, laws, secrets, stages, cycles, and all the rest, that almost exclusively resonates with the author, along with their sales environment and personality. That's why he or she wrote the book. It worked for them but that may have absolutely nothing to do with me.

In fact, there has been many times that 'book" advice was actually counterproductive in the real world of selling---this is why I am here--the real world laced with actual events to be shared.

Also, seasoned sales people know that when facing a prospect there is really one unique identity facing another unique identity. In that moment there is no specific formula as the conversation is forever shifting.

Often when I did try to apply this type of advice from books, it seems like I was holding "The Boxing Federation How-To Manuel" in one hand while climbing in the ring with the other.

However, when starting out in sales, such sources are very valuable in building a solid sales foundation to work from and to change to your particular style.
- by John Voris
"the question behind the question is do people who search sales education on Amazon differ from people who visit here--and vice versa?" -- GB

I don't know about that as I don't buy many books and never has bought one from Amazon - I'l a print oriented man always have been print oriented although I appreciate audios and now videos also. I rarely buy anything though - I read daily on line and check out books from the library being civic minded, quaint and old fashioned, and cheap.

MitchM - by MitchM
At this point I'd take a maybe.

But seriously, the reason I asked the question is because that book had gone to number one ranking among business books at Amazon in less than a week. So maybe the question behind the question is do people who search sales education on Amazon differ from people who visit here--and vice versa? Over the years I would say that there is not that much book discussion on SalesPractice.

I grew up in a publishing family and I think that hardwired my predisposition towards the printed word. I certainly don't believe everything I read, of course. I did read the Sandler Rules book and I personally would give it a high score. Author, btw, is David Mattson.
Why do I avoid books on selling?

One last point on the subject: the Borges Fable.

A cartographer drew a map of the Empire. It was so detailed and accurate that when unfolded, it covered the entire territory. This is an allegory of absurd simulation.

With today's sophistication, many business abstract ideas placed in books are no longer a map of any real territory but are "simulations", morphed from an earlier "virtual" rendition of a preceding territory.

Such "simulation" models of the "virtual," are without any real origin: they are hyper-real. Yet, we are sold on the idea that beneath them are marks of a real Empire, holding the solutions to our problems. Then later with experience, we discover there was never a territory in the first place.

What happened when I read these books years ago and sales failed to improve? Naturally, I assumed I was the one avoiding reality. - by John Voris
Successful people create their own reality and understand that when they read what others write about theirs. Use everything to create your own maps, market, prospect list - charter new places not yet invented. - by MitchM
I would be interested to find out from someone who has read it. I have read thousands of sales books and never made it to this one.

My curiosity is whether the book outlines the principles that Sandler use to sell their franchise system or if it acts as a lead generation tool into their franchise system. - by peter-odonoghue
I would be interested to find out from someone who has read it. I have read thousands of sales books and never made it to this one.

My curiosity is whether the book outlines the principles that Sandler use to sell their franchise system or if it acts as a lead generation tool into their franchise system.
The book is not written in outline form. It discusses self-contained aspects of selling as viewed through the lens of that particular philosophy of selling. For those, like yourself, who have or intend to read thousands of sales books, The Sandler Rules would be well placed among the first five to begin with. - by Gary A Boye
The book is not written in outline form. It discusses self-contained aspects of selling as viewed through the lens of that particular philosophy of selling. For those, like yourself, who have or intend to read thousands of sales books, The Sandler Rules would be well placed among the first five to begin with.
A friend sent me the Sandler Training Series through email. This may or may not be the same as the book. However, it consists of anecdotes expanding on real sales experiences and lessons learned by a hypothetical person called Bob.

While the series is so extensive, even a seasoned sales rep can learn something, most stories are about sensible tactics and someone heavily experienced may find it too simplistic.

A well-known example of simplicity is the story about the rookie car salesman who ignored an old man in disheveled coveralls meandering between the rows of cars. He didn't want to waste time on such a loser.

As the insulted old man started walking off the lot, the manager with a look of horror on his face, ran out to catch him but was too late. He turned to the rookie who didn't know what the fuss was all about and asked, "Do you know who he was? No, said the rookie. That was the 3rd richest man in the county looking to upgrade his corporate fleet--he's worth millions. (The story has had many variations over the decades)

Lesson: don't judge a book by the cover.

It's good lesson for the rookie and we all at times get caught on this one but seasoned sales reps also know that giving equal time to apparent "non-buyers" will cause your bottom line to plummet. Marketing is a multi-million dollar industry for some reason.

As I recall the book, "Selling to Vito," does the opposite. It is all about focusing only on the most likely buyer.

I think the truth lies in the middle.

That being said, I agree with Gary that on the whole, it is a more believable and therefore, a more viable approach to teaching sales than most publications. - by John Voris
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