Home > Social Influence > We Would Like Your Opinion

We Would Like Your Opinion

Has anyone read the book "Influence" by Robert B. Cialdini? Or, have you heard the opinions of others on the book?

It seems it's all the rage among marketeers in England. He offers "Six Weapons of Influence" that he claims corporations use in their advertising and sales techniques. - by John Voris
Hello John.

Yes, I have read the book. What was your take on the material? - by Jeff Blackwell
Hello John.

Yes, I have read the book. What was your take on the material?

Well, I'm really looking for other views. We have been asked to use our system in assessing "Influence." In our dedication to fairness, we are searching for assorted perspectives. - by John Voris
I read the book about five years ago. I felt it focused more on persuasion than influence. They are two different things. Certainly Influence pertains to positioning oneself favorably. That is strategic. Persuasion involves tactics more than strategy. I don't recall gaining anything from the book. - by Gary A Boye
I have read the book, as well his other recent title "Yes" and did gain some insights into the psychology of influence.

Specifically, there is some interesting research on the effective use of social proof, how to use progressive commitments to leverage the tendency toward consistency, and labeling and the influence of impressions.

I have found it interesting material to support the fundamentals of professional selling and offer my students a look behind the curtain of sales practices to see the buying psychology at work in the words and actions. This has been helpful in motivating sales students to learn and use the practices I teach because they gain insight into why they are being taught.

These are not books that will teach you how to influence, but offer some insight into how influence occurs. - by thesalesgiant
I have read the book, as well his other recent title "Yes" and did gain some insights into the psychology of influence.

Specifically, there is some interesting research on the effective use of social proof, how to use progressive commitments to leverage the tendency toward consistency, and labeling and the influence of impressions.

I have found it interesting material to support the fundamentals of professional selling and offer my students a look behind the curtain of sales practices to see the buying psychology at work in the words and actions. This has been helpful in motivating sales students to learn and use the practices I teach because they gain insight into why they are being taught.

These are not books that will teach you how to influence, but offer some insight into how influence occurs.
In your view, is "social proof" behavior dictated by social conformity as stated or conforming behavior resulting from shared interests? - by John Voris
I read the book about 10 years ago.

It helped me understand some things I was already doing in my selling or had noticed while selling.

It made some concepts clearer and highlighted the magnitude of the influence they exerted which was far bigger than I had imagined.

As an example, I worked for an importing company and we always marveled at how customers would open up to technical visitors from overseas. Then I read "Influence" and it's reference to "The Milgram Experiment" and I understood better the impact of authority on an interaction. - by Greg Woodley
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.