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What's more important in selling?

That the prospect like, trust or respect you, and in what order? Or are all three equally important? - by salesjunior
That the prospect like, trust or respect you, and in what order? Or are all three equally important?
Of the three, TRUST (the confidence factor) is the most contributory to making sales. A prospect LIKING the salesperson would be second. Both of these factors are regulated by the prospect's feelings.

The third factor, RESPECT, comes out of a different place--one of attitude. It is easier to influence feelings than it is to influence attitude.

Any one of the conditions could be absent and a sale can still be made, of course.

CONDITIONS OF MUTUAL TRUST (feelings) and RESPECT (attitude) are ideal. When a salesperson reaches a point experientially of being able to identify such conditions, he/she would probably be functioning at an advanced level of selling and enjoying the success that goes with it. - by Gary A Boye
I believe trust is vital.

If the sales persons company folds, for whatever reason, all they have is their experience, contact database and track record. Without the trust of their previous prospects they are in for hard times ahead. - by Tony Pizii
That the prospect like, trust or respect you, and in what order? Or are all three equally important?
I'm sure someone won't be happy with my choices and here it goes;

#1 - Respect
We need to respect a person in their chosen profession otherwise we aren't going to listen to anything that comes out of their mouth. Do they dress approperate to their position? Do they have Interpersonal skills? Are they competent? How is their Attitude? Do they have knowledge in their field? All of these things in my opinion build respect and even in the initial encounter with a sales person we require some form of respect.

#2 - Like
When was the last time you spoke at length with someone you didn't like? Imagine it was a sales encounter, how would you react with a sales person you didn't like who continually asked you questions. What kind of answers would you give them?

#3 - Trust
Trust is huge, however; without the two above I doubt you will get to the point of the conversation where trust is in question. The big thing in my opinion trust comes down to is the intent of the sales person. - by MrCharisma
I'm sure someone won't be happy with my choices and here it goes;

#1 - Respect
We need to respect a person in their chosen profession otherwise we aren't going to listen to anything that comes out of their mouth. Do they dress approperate to their position? Do they have Interpersonal skills? Are they competent? How is their Attitude? Do they have knowledge in their field? All of these things in my opinion build respect and even in the initial encounter with a sales person we require some form of respect.
This is an interesting perspective to evaluate. There are several assumptions. First, I have to cast doubt on the statement that people don't listen to anything that comes out of the mouth of someone they don't respect. Another assumption is that a prospect is qualified to address "interpersonal skills" which is truly an area of specialization. If the prospect happens to be a human resources manager---then perhaps. "Competency", as a disqualifyer, could hardly be revealed until the sales engagement is underway--and again there is that assumption that a prospect is qualified to judge competency. Prospects aren't always experts. It is TRUST that compensates for that reality.

"Attitude?" Anyone who has been in sales long enough realizes that attitude is most often a default mechanism among prospects. If it is distracting to the sales engagement, it is the building of TRUST that will overcome that obstacle.

Put me first among those who disagree with your perspective on this. It just doesn't hold up to scrutinization. AND--it's an important topic here on SalesPractice. - by Gary A Boye
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