Home > Consumer Behavior > Consumer wants and the disposition to action.

Consumer wants and the disposition to action.

"To want a particular product is to have a disposition toward using, consuming, or possessing that product. Wants are always identified in terms of a disposition to some action. Thus, if someone wants a car he or she is a 'suspect' for buying a car since having the want means a disposition toward possessing the car. This in turn, suggest the possibility of future buying."-John O'Shaughnessy

Do you believe the statement above is accurate? - by Community Mailbox
I believe it is accurate. - by Gary A Boye
"To want a particular product is to have a disposition toward using, consuming, or possessing that product. Wants are always identified in terms of a disposition to some action. Thus, if someone wants a car he or she is a 'suspect' for buying a car since having the want means a disposition toward possessing the car. This in turn, suggest the possibility of future buying."-John O'Shaughnessy

Do you believe the statement above is accurate?
Yes, I believe that statement is accurate. - by Jeff Blackwell
I would agree and would add a 4th and that is afford the product and action can be received. - by rich34232
...and would add a 4th and that is afford the product and action can be received.
I do not believe that is accurate. There are many reasons why someone may "want without buying" (e.g.; latent wants, passive wants, exclusionary reasons). - by Jeff Blackwell
Jeff I would agree with your statement concerning wants without buying.

Thus, if someone wants a car he or she is a 'suspect' for buying a car since having the want means a disposition toward possessing the car. This in turn, suggests the possibility of future buying."-John O'Shaughnessy

I can want all I want if I cannot afford it the quote of: This in turn, suggests the possibility of future buying" is not accurate.I have not met any sales person that works for something 2-4 years down the road. I have met many that work with me now and will sell me something and work for future sales relationships after the first. That is a different topic.

What is future buying, tomorrow, a year from now, 2 years from now?

I am of a belief that there must be 4 criteria for a sale to happen. This does not and will not guarantee that a sale happens with me. They are want, need, can use and can afford. I can guarantee this if I do not hit all four of these criteria with my clients I will not get a sale. - by rich34232
I am of a belief that there must be 4 criteria for a sale to happen. This does not and will not guarantee that a sale happens with me. They are want, need, can use and can afford. I can guarantee this if I do not hit all four of these criteria with my clients I will not get a sale.
Rich, I don't agree. Many purchases are made that do not stem from need. Many products purchased do not get used for a variety of reasons, one of which would be an ill conceived purchase in the first place. With regard to affordability, millions of people have made purchases that they could not afford which is a big reason for the rampant incidence of men and women struggling with uncontrollable debt today.

This is not a reflection on your personal qualifying process which is your right to choose as mine is for me. But those qualifications do not hold up as a general assessment of criteria for purchases to take place, which is more in line with this discussion. - by Gary A Boye
I can want all I want if I cannot afford it the quote of: "This in turn, suggests the possibility of future buying" is not accurate.
I do not agree that the quote is inaccurate.

Here are two additional quotes that may provide insight. Both are by John O'Shaughnessy, "Why People Buy" (1987).
  • "When price is an exclusionary reason, the consumer does not have and cannot get the money to buy the product."
  • "Marketing is usually ineffective in removing the barrier of exclusionary reasons as the consumer is already "sold" on the product but obligations and incapacities prevent acting on the want. However, although the consumer is not a buying prospect, he or she remains a buying suspect in case circumstances change."
- by Jeff Blackwell
Occam's Razor Time:

People will mostly do what they want to do if they are able to do it.

The want of not doing is also a want.

Buying is a form of doing.

The want that drives the doing (buying) is not necessarily the want of the product or service.

The want that drives the not doing is not necessarily because of a lack of want for the product or service. - by Gary A Boye
Occam's Razor Time:


Buying is a form of doing.

The want that drives the doing (buying) is not necessarily the want of the product or service.

The want that drives the not doing is not necessarily because of a lack of want for the product or service.
Gary--Excellent point.

It is a perfect Occam moment. ;bg

Having the "want" move the action is a unique perspective.

Objects are symbols of meaning--that is what we are after. It is the "want" that is moving the action with the product or service being the catalyst to fulfillment.

It is as if we are all on stage to play out our drama and objects and services are the props we use in that expression.

And to "want" does not necessarily indicate any lacking whatsoever. (Motivation texts falsely point to lacking as an essential factor).

Another dimension of the sale is owning the decision fulfilling the "want" both separate from the actual "thing" bought.

Thanks for additional component to the dynamics of the sale.

IMO this level and depth of insight is what makes salespractice a unique opportunity. - by John Voris
Having the "want" move the action is a unique perspective.
In what way is that perspective unique John?

And to "want" does not necessarily indicate any lacking whatsoever. (Motivation texts falsely point to lacking as an essential factor).
What does "lacking" mean to you? - by Jeff Blackwell
In what way is that perspective unique John?

What does "lacking" mean to you?
The sale lives in the drive to "want" the projected experience rather than the "thing" wanted.

This is seldom covered in sales training material. They usually focus on features and benefits that the "thing" offers. This is why sales people often give everything the prospect says they want, only to see them walk away and say they will call back.

Where's the disconnect? The disconnect occurs in the misdirected focus.

When people buy, they are more concerned with "owning" the decision they made, than what they purchased. This explains why people in grocery stores are so protective of their carts: they own the decisions that lay within it. They certainly don't own the items, at least not yet. - by John Voris
The sale lives in the drive to "want" the projected experience rather than the "thing" wanted.
Do you perceive this to be different than "The want behind the want"?
When people buy, they are more concerned with "owning" the decision they made, than what they purchased. This explains why people in grocery stores are so protective of their carts: they own the decisions that lay within it. They certainly don't own the items, at least not yet.
Please elaborate. - by Jeff Blackwell
Gary, disagree or agree in my profession if it does not meet the 4 criteria I have stated there is no sale and that is a guarantee. The need becomes I need to have it. I tend to think cannot afford it means the customer cannot get the money for it. How a person decides to spend their budget or a condition prevents a person to pay or not pay their bills are another thing. I can address the can use, if a person does not use or there is no purpose to have the product or service the sales person in my estimation sold the customer a product and or service that should not have been sold. I am not talking about retail clothing store or shoes, hardware items.

Jeff the first quote aligns with my statement.

As you all well know and should not have to be stated not everything is 100% and will not guarantee a sale. I would hope that this would be a known fact. I will stand by my core beliefs in my profession in the service industry.
- by rich34232
The average human beings has hundreds of 'desires' (wants) flowing through their central nervous system every single day, as many desires and urges to possess as related thoughts that flow through their head.

Most are fleeting, quickly replaced by the next following urge, desire, want, or craving to occur as thoughts change every few seconds or minutes.

A recent Harvard University study found that most people's attention wanders off into various thoughts at least 46.9% of their waking day. These thoughts carry psychological and physiology-affecting content, often comprised of wants and desires, most of which resulting in no action whatsoever than the mere repeating of the mechanical thought process day after day, year after year, unto the grave.

Thus, the mere possession of a want is NO guarantee of disposition to action.

However, someone who DOES purchase MAY likely have possessed a desire.

HOWEVER, much buying is done without a prerequisite want, but after having a want inspired by a crafty salesperson or alluring vendor display.

When it comes to the products & services I offer, there's no impulse buying, thus a good 'suspect' comes to me (in relation to 'wanting') just so:

A) If the want is a consistent psychological event (a continually occurring desire) and...

B) If the consistent desire is for MY particular type of product or service, and...

C) If the physiological impulse is intense and strong enough to induce the action of seeking, THEN...

...THAT person is a legitimate 'suspect' for the sales process for what I do. - by DynamicMentalFitness
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