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Tips on getting past the "gate keeper"?

Just starting out with my new sales position, the main concern I have is how to get past the receptionist when I am making my calls?
I know that everyone has their own approach and what works for one person may not work for another person.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what generally works well for them? Or what type of approach can get me to the main decision maker, get the background on the decision maker, or just to "get my foot in the door?" - by rachelspaude
Just starting out with my new sales position, the main concern I have is how to get past the receptionist when I am making my calls?
I know that everyone has their own approach and what works for one person may not work for another person.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what generally works well for them? Or what type of approach can get me to the main decision maker, get the background on the decision maker, or just to "get my foot in the door?"
It has been said by many here including myself that homework is everything.

If you walked in the door knowing their business, how they function on a daily basis, their concerns and competition, that alone would tell the gate keeper: you are dedicated to high performance and you are truly concerned with their financial well-being. This also means you most likely will know how to help them where others would not.

I would try to know so much about my prospect that I would walk in like I was an ex-employee.

That was my approach. - by John Voris
Great tip. I will defiantly do my research.
I am also finding out that the best way to find out specifics about a company is to simply ask questions. If you are nice and considerate, normally the gatekeeper will give you the same in return.

I have a sweet, youthful voice since I am so young and I am going to take full advantage of it.

I also went to our own gatekeeper in our company to get some feedback from her. She told me that if she thinks the sales person on the phone is genuine and polite, she will put them through to a live person as appose to a voice mail. She also advised me that her biggest pet peeve is when the sales person tries to play game, or trick her into "sneaking" through. This is the worst way to try to approach a gatekeeper because all it will do is frustrate her and not want to help.

I will try a few other ways as well, but I think truthful, sincere and politeness is going to be the best fit for me.

thanks again! - by rachelspaude
Here's another tip: Drop the word "gatekeeper" from your vocabulary.

Selling is a people business. The administrative assistants, receptionists, and staff members, who are often labeled as "gatekeepers", are frequently the second most powerful people in an organization. Respect them--don't label them - by Gary A Boye
Here's another tip: Drop the word "gatekeeper" from your vocabulary.

Selling is a people business. The administrative assistants, receptionists, and staff members, who are often labeled as "gatekeepers", are frequently the second most powerful people in an organization. Respect them--don't label them
As usual Gary - Dead on.

"I am also finding out that the best way to find out specifics about a company is to simply ask questions. If you are nice and considerate, normally the gatekeeper will give you the same in return."

Good instincts. - by tw5270
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