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Follow-Up Situation Specific Question

Hi all! First just let me preface in that I probably wouldn't need to ask this question had I handled my initial prospect meeting better but here is the scenario:

Did demonstration of our upgraded service to an existing customer a couple of weeks ago. The demonstration went well, so well that the customer went out of his way to praise how great it was and I could tell he was excited. At the end of the demonstration he said to send him so pricing options and that I could follow-up in a few days. I followed-up and I got the old " I saw your email come in but I have been so busy I haven't had time to check." Please follow-up again.

My concern here is that when I follow-up again he will say the same thing and I want to know how to respond in a non-abrasive/confrontational way to get a yes or no answer.

Also, any suggestions on how to avoid these types of situations in the future would be great.

Thanks!! - by kenpo1980
Hi all! First just let me preface in that I probably wouldn't need to ask this question had I handled my initial prospect meeting better but here is the scenario:

Did demonstration of our upgraded service to an existing customer a couple of weeks ago. The demonstration went well, so well that the customer went out of his way to praise how great it was and I could tell he was excited. At the end of the demonstration he said to send him so pricing options and that I could follow-up in a few days. I followed-up and I got the old " I saw your email come in but I have been so busy I haven't had time to check." Please follow-up again.

My concern here is that when I follow-up again he will say the same thing and I want to know how to respond in a non-abrasive/confrontational way to get a yes or no answer.

Also, any suggestions on how to avoid these types of situations in the future would be great.

Thanks!!
The purpose of follow up is NOT to get a yes or no answer. Follow up is not a reactive process--it's proactive. You need to Set The Stage at the initial contact for the follow up. As stated before, follow up should always be Promise Generated. That means you promise to be back in touch usually with further information. Working reactively leaves you totally out of control. - by Gary A Boye
The purpose of follow up is NOT to get a yes or no answer. Follow up is not a reactive process--it's proactive. You need to Set The Stage at the initial contact for the follow up. As stated before, follow up should always be Promise Generated. That means you promise to be back in touch usually with further information. Working reactively leaves you totally out of control.

I like your idea of Promise Generated. That gives it greater power rather than a casual comment that sounds more like a "maybe." This approach cloaks what your doing with an air of confidence in the eyes of the prospect by being in control and dispensing instructions.

Also, like the teacher expecting homework from a student, the prospect (student) is more likely to anticipate and even prepare for your call.

I think that is very good advice. ;bg - by John Voris
Thanks for the responses guys. So would it follow that you should never need to follow-up if you have done your initial presentation correctly?

In other words, if the prospect sees the value of what you presented and believes it will do whatever is promised than they should be willing to give a yes or no answer at that time.

Or put another way, should follow-up only be necessary for me to provide the prospect additional information that will help them make a decision or for them to do something on their end which will allow them to make decision?

I guess the answer to this question also probably varies based on the sales cycle of the product in question. - by kenpo1980
Thanks for the responses guys. So would it follow that you should never need to follow-up if you have done your initial presentation correctly?
You learn and grow by DETERMINING the right question(s).

In your case, you could add to that: Asking The Right People.

If I was in your shoes, I would want to know the ratios between first contact, second contact, and third contact closes which were (are) experienced by my coworkers, predecessors, and management's projections (experientially formulated).

You will either get answers, or find that you're working in a system that has no strategic plan in place. As a newcomer to sales, such circumstances would be challenging, perhaps even crippling. - by Gary A Boye
Hi,

Is there a possibility your service (or product, generically) is not a priority requirement for the prospect? (IMPORTANT, but NOT URGENT?)

It may have excited the prospect to know such a service exists (and is even priced right), but the requirement is long term? Was there any other indicator to suggest otherwise? If not, it may help to know its priority for the prospect (- perhaps should have been found out during the first call itself).

Just exploring a possibility.

Ganesan. - by ezynes
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