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Types of Closing

I am trying to write about 5 different closing techniques and I am having a heard time trying to differentiate between a couple of them. This is what I have so far.

Direct Close - presenting the client with the material and asking them if they would like to purchase it
Assumptive Close - letting the client know that certain types of products will be included in their sale
Turn Over Close - getting another associate to help you with the sale if you are unable to complete the sale itself

I am unable to put my finger on:
Either/Or Close -
Urgency Close -

I am not sure how to present these and could use any advice that anyone is willing to share. Also, if you notice an easier way to explain types of closes already defined, that would be great! Any feedback is appreciated. Thanks! - by TDeveloperA
I'll comment on what you ave written in an attempt to provide you with a better understanding:

Direct Close - presenting the client with the material and asking them if they would like to purchase it
This is not a close. Closing is a Progression of Consent. This is a Closing Question.
Assumptive Close - letting the client know that certain types of products will be included in their sale.
That is part of the presentation, not closing per se. An "assumptive close" refers to an attempt to force a sale by proceeding with elements of the transaction without the prospect's direct consent. I can say that the developers of SalesPractice do not recommend that practice.
Turn Over Close - getting another associate to help you with the sale if you are unable to complete the sale itself.
Not a close. Simply a maneuver to engage help. Usually it involves introducing symbolic authority in the form of another person.

Either/Or Close -
Refers to a Closing Question where you give a choice between two buying options. Also called an Alternate Advance. It's a form of "assumptive" closing.
Urgency Close -
Refers to the insertion of a time sensitive proposition. It could be real, imagined, or a falsehood. The cardinal rule is to never insert urgency unless it exists. To attempt otherwise will often destroy credibility.
- by Gary A Boye
I'll comment on what you ave written in an attempt to provide you with a better understanding:

Direct Close - presenting the client with the material and asking them if they would like to purchase it
This is not a close. Closing is a Progression of Consent. This is a Closing Question.
Assumptive Close - letting the client know that certain types of products will be included in their sale.
That is part of the presentation, not closing per se. An "assumptive close" refers to an attempt to force a sale by proceeding with elements of the transaction without the prospect's direct consent. I can say that the developers of SalesPractice do not recommend that practice.
Turn Over Close - getting another associate to help you with the sale if you are unable to complete the sale itself.
Not a close. Simply a maneuver to engage help. Usually it involves introducing symbolic authority in the form of another person.
Either/Or Close -
Refers to a Closing Question where you give a choice between two buying options. Also called an Alternate Advance. It's a form of "assumptive" closing.
Urgency Close -
Refers to the insertion of a time sensitive proposition. It could be real, imagined, or a falsehood. The cardinal rule is to never insert urgency unless it exists. To attempt otherwise will often destroy credibility.
Thank you for the great feedback! Would you suggest then that these are all considered closing questions? - by TDeveloperA
Thank you for the great feedback! Would you suggest then that these are all considered closing questions?
Well, the key is to remember that Closing is not an event. It's a progression. Unfortunately, it's often misinterpreted as an event such as a Closing Question.

I would say from reading your original post that your examples are more in the realm of closing questions--or techniques. Closing is more strategic than tactical. It's a matter of step-by-step putting things in place--thus a Progression of Consent. A series of minor commitments, that synergistically combine for an ultimate consummation of agreement, is another way of describing the process. - by Gary A Boye
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