Home > Cold Calling > Cold Calling to Eliminate Prospects?

Cold Calling to Eliminate Prospects?

I am relatively new to sales and I am starting to think that the purpose of my calls should be to elminate prospects and not set appointments.

What I mean by this is that it seems that in my company's sales culture there is a push to get into see a customer no matter what. This will often result in an appointment but many of these appointments end up being a total waste of time.

I am wondering if I were to just take the approach of asking questions that would allow a prospect to eliminate themselves might be better than just blindly pushing for an appointment.

Anyone who takes this approach? - by kenpo1980
I am relatively new to sales and I am starting to think that the purpose of my calls should be to elminate prospects and not set appointments.

What I mean by this is that it seems that in my company's sales culture there is a push to get into see a customer no matter what. This will often result in an appointment but many of these appointments end up being a total waste of time.

I am wondering if I were to just take the approach of asking questions that would allow a prospect to eliminate themselves might be better than just blindly pushing for an appointment.

Anyone who takes this approach?
Good question. There are at least two things to consider based on what you have said.

First, it's risky from a job security standpoint to go against the flow of a company's "culture", particularly if you are new.

Second, the philosophy of prospecting by disqualifying "prospects" is viable, and contained in some advanced sales systems. But--again you're new--and such systems require considerable orientation and training.

However, that said, you may be on the right track. Not enough information here to evaluate. - by Gary A Boye
Thanks for the response. I have actually picked up on this idea from sales books I have read so I have to admit that I didn't think it up out of the blue;sm

As far as my comment on my corporate culture it's not that they really care how many appointments we have but my new manager, and my prior manager, seem to be of the belief that any appointment was a good appointment.

The problem with this logic is that I don't get paid based on appointments so every moment I spend with a customer who has no interest in buying what I am selling in immediate future is kind of waste of my time, especially since I operate off a monthly quota and I have to report numbers weekly.

Obviously I don't want to burn bridges and I do want to make prospects aware that they can call me when they are interested but it seems that those people aren't worth meeting with right now.

I am seriously thinking of just becoming more upfront in my prospecting so that I only spend my limited appointment times with those prospects that are at least open to what I am offering instead of setting appointments under a pretense of an "account review" or some other nonsense.

I know a lot of sales people tend to try to use a bit of trickery to get seen by customers but my take is that if your product is really offering them a strong enough benefit they will want to meet. - by kenpo1980
Kenpo1980, what would be your criteria for disqualification? - by Jeff Blackwell
That's a great question and something that I have to think through a bit but I think this really comes down to whether the customer wants to meet with me after I have laid out the value proposition of what I am offering.

If after I break everything down and the customer makes clear that they will not be spending any more money under any circumstances than there is no reason for me to waste my time with that individual. - by kenpo1980
That's a great question and something that I have to think through a bit but I think this really comes down to whether the customer wants to meet with me after I have laid out the value proposition of what I am offering.

If after I break everything down and the customer makes clear that they will not be spending any more money under any circumstances than there is no reason for me to waste my time with that individual.
In my opinion, disqualifying prospects that do not meet your company's minimum requirements (number of employees, annual revenues, etc.) or some similar "disqualifying" criteria is not the same as disqualifying prospects because they do not want to meet with you after you have laid out the value proposition of what you are offering. Do you see a difference? - by Jeff Blackwell
Thanks for the response Jeff!

So let me ask you then, do you think there are other situations that would allow or justify the elimination of prospects?

Actually, you really have me thinking a bit about my question and maybe the issue isn't a matter of elminating prospects but of coming up with better questions that qualify or disqualify prospects. And I guess much of this requires at least a formal process of discovery to really know whether a prospect should be eliminated. - by kenpo1980
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