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Best Sales Trainings - Your Opinions

Sandler, Tony Robbins, Carnegie, SPIN, Green Light Selling, High-Probability Selling, Unconscious Selling, Consultative Selling (Brian Tracy et al), Motivational Selling and 100 ways to close (Ziglar, et al).

Each of these trainings has a philosophy - a way of approaching selling. I am looking for something new - something that isn't more of the same, something to challenge and shock me.

What are the trainings that have shocked you, schooled you, made you stop in your tracks and say "Damn, that is good!" I am especially looking for something other than the trainings above (or more "find a need and fill it - consultative sales" blah blah blah.)

Why do you suggest them?

Here's to a good conversation!

Mark - by asexymind
Before we get started:

Do you really believe that the examples you gave in your post are similar to one another? I am very familiar with those programs and see major differences in their focuses.

Of those above, how many have you consciously adopted to your own work before you made such negative judgments?

You mention that each has a philosophy. What would you consider to be the philosophy of High Probability Selling as compared to Brian Tracy's work? - by Gary A Boye
Gary, thanks for the response.

I certainly did not mean to demean or discount the programs above, nor imply they are all the same. In fact, I listed them because I have personally received serious value from each of them and I thought them to be representative of their type of training (each of which has a different focus/USP).

Rather, I am looking for something new to me. At this point, I am personally tired/bored of hearing sales 101 consultative selling over and over out of the next trainer's mouth. Give me something that makes me think! Give me something that shocks me, something cocky, that I haven't heard half a dozen or 3 dozen times!

By listing the training methodologies I am familiar with, I was hoping other members might 1. share their thoughts about their favorites, 2. turn me on to other trainings.

Example: when a friend turned me on to Sandler a few years ago, I learned a lot because it was different and powerful. It is so cocky and structured and contract focused. It brought out my competitive/dominant instincts. It got me thinking. I want more of that! :-)

Another example: Selling With Integrity by Sharon Drew Morgan. It is on the extreme end of the consultative selling spectrum, where you really act like a consultant. I found it challenging and provocative. It fundamentally changed the way I sell. I want more experiences like that, and am hoping this group can turn me on to their favorites - the one that think outside the standard box.

High Prob vs. Brain Tracy? The main difference I think of between the two is High Prob puts qualification first/front and center in the conversation (Next!), where BT is more traditional “close the appointment, build/find the need, then close the deal.” High probability focuses on finding clients who are ready to buy now, who understand and desire your offer as you summarize it. It suggests you spend less time trying to convert NO to YES, and more time looking for YESes. That is what makes it distinct/different for me, what makes it stand out, what makes me value it. What do you understand to be the central difference between them?

Again, thanks for the response. I hope to hear and offer some great ideas!

Mark - by asexymind
Do you think salespeople should change themselves to fit the sales process, or change the process to fit themselves? - by salesjunior
Do you think salespeople should change themselves to fit the sales process, or change the process to fit themselves?
Well, certainly successful salespeople work with well-defined goals. Once those goals are set and defined it's then a matter of determining what it's going to take to get where you want to go. If you determine that you already have the tools, why change anything?

If, on the other hand, you come to a realization that you can't get where you want to be with what you have, then it's time to consider change. One such change might be to choose and assimilate a new "process" of selling. If you do that, and you define yourself by what you do (your behavior), you ARE changing yourself as a byproduct as well as acquiring your new process.

The inherent danger is falling prey to the "Not Good Enough" syndrome which is the biggest deterrent to success in just about any human endeavor you can name. Tim Gallwey's works on The Inner Game address this very well, and remain some of the best material on coaching and performance ever published. - by Gary A Boye
Do you think salespeople should change themselves to fit the sales process, or change the process to fit themselves?
To leverage from asexymind:

“Example: when a friend turned me on to Sandler a few years ago, I learned a lot because it was different and powerful. It is so cocky and structured and contract focused. It brought out my competitive/dominant instincts. It got me thinking. I want more of that!”

Never in my 30 years of cold-calling did I ever feel competitive or like I was dominating another and certainly never powerful.

If a seminar leader had said, “ In order to sell you’ve got to get that competitive spirit,” I would have tried and failed trying to be someone I am not.


Now for asexymind, this prompted him to want more because it conformed with who he is.

Again from asexymind:

“Another example: Selling With Integrity by Sharon Drew Morgan. It is on the extreme end of the consultative selling spectrum, where you really act like a consultant.”

However, by taking on the idea that I was “consulting prospects” was a new technique that altered my demeanor and approach with them. What I had been doing before, now had polish and this sense of “polish” eventually became part of who I was at a deeper level.

As Gary says, selling involves a process or a way of “doing.” Most are flexible to change the way they “do” things.

This external way of “doing” will eventually be absorbed into a way of “being” in order to produce consistency of execution.

The balanced synthesis between “doing” and “being” is the recipe for unified and focused excellence. - by John Voris
Over the last 30-40 years, the ongoing research by Caliper suggests that the basic personality traits in a successful salesperson remain in almost equal measure - empathy, ego-drive, and frustration tolerance.

So, according to exhaustive research, you need to be able to

1. Put yourself in the clients' shoes,

2. You need to persuade people to your point of view, and

3. Be able to overcome all the frustrations in any sales context.

Moving on to behavior, the road to success can have many paths depending on a lot of factors.

Whatever the methodology, it's extremely critical to be able to uncover the real wants/needs of your propects. It's also critical to know how to sell your solution to the prospect. Moreover, you must actually know how to make your solution address the client's problems and solve them for real.

An overarching success factor is truly caring about the outcome of a relationship between the two companies. Caring deeply about a positive outcome for all (and knowing how to produce it) is the super-fuel of sales.

Nothing can beat the real deal.

But, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong.sn; - by magicman
Do you think salespeople should change themselves to fit the sales process, or change the process to fit themselves?
Please elaborate on what you mean by "the sales process". Thank you.

__________________
"Dealing with people is probably the biggest problem you face, especially if you are in business." - Dale Carnegie - by Jeff Blackwell
Please elaborate on what you mean by "the sales process". Thank you.
SPIN, Solution Selling, Consultative Selling etc. Some parts of the process as defined by the author we might feel uncomfortable with, such as the use of scripts, a closing technique, a type of behaviour etc. We might feel this part of the process is ineffective, manipulative, out-dated or unnatural for our personality style. This might just be our “gut feeling” and there may be no logical justification to reject it, regardless it puts a negative seed in our minds. We are then in the difficult situation of deciding whether to trust the process or trust our instincts. Which should we trust? For example should we trust a sales trainer who says we should Always Be Closing, or should we cherry pick the parts of his sales process that resonate with our beliefs, attitudes, behaviours etc and reject the parts that don’t, or should we put our trust in the “experts” and do exactly as they say. - by salesjunior
..should we trust a sales trainer who says we should Always Be Closing,....?
No, you should not.

IMO. - by Gary A Boye
SPIN, Solution Selling, Consultative Selling etc. Some parts of the process as defined by the author we might feel uncomfortable with, such as the use of scripts, a closing technique, a type of behaviour etc. We might feel this part of the process is ineffective, manipulative, out-dated or unnatural for our personality style. This might just be our “gut feeling” and there may be no logical justification to reject it, regardless it puts a negative seed in our minds. We are then in the difficult situation of deciding whether to trust the process or trust our instincts. Which should we trust? For example should we trust a sales trainer who says we should Always Be Closing, or should we cherry pick the parts of his sales process that resonate with our beliefs, attitudes, behaviours etc and reject the parts that don’t, or should we put our trust in the “experts” and do exactly as they say.
There are many analogies to sales but my favorite is Dating.

How would you ask a woman out on a date?

How would you be with her on that date?

Certainly there are "unsaid" rules. There is universally unacceptable behavior but would you follow an outline?

Would you use a script--especially if someone else wrote it?

"...should we cherry pick the parts of his sales process that resonate with our beliefs, attitudes, behaviours etc and reject the parts that don’t..."

That is what experienced sales people do.

If they do attend a sales seminar it is in the hopes to find just one grain of new information they can use. Some say just 1% of new information could be worth the entrance fees.

The point is, sales is a human experience. There are no solid, immovable, fast rules for all of sales only guidelines that are often broken . - by John Voris
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