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Strategies to overcome call reluctance

Some days I have trouble getting in the groove of making calls. It's not laziness, but call reluctance. Anyone have any strategies or motivational thoughts to overcome call reluctance?

Thanks! - by Danomyte
Some days I have trouble getting in the groove of making calls. It's not laziness, but call reluctance. Anyone have any strategies or motivational thoughts to overcome call reluctance?

Thanks!
Is calling what you do for a living? - by Gary A Boye
Some days I have trouble getting in the groove of making calls. It's not laziness, but call reluctance
How do you think about call reluctance? - by Jeff Blackwell
Yes. And when you ask that question, it makes me feel rather silly for starting this post in the first place. As this is my living, it should be enough to motivate me to give it all I've got.

I still find myself reluctant to get in the "zone" of making calls. - by Danomyte
As this is my living, it should be enough to motivate me to give it all I've got.
How do you know to use that standard? - by Jeff Blackwell
How do you know to use that standard?
I guess I don't. My real motivator is becoming successful in sales. My job is pure prospecting, which I know is an important aspect of sales. I get motivated having great conversations, but my fear of rejection and the constant feeling that I'm "bothering" people takes its toll. I can't seem to just shut it off. - by Danomyte
I guess I don't. My real motivator is becoming successful in sales. My job is pure prospecting, which I know is an important aspect of sales. I get motivated having great conversations, but my fear of rejection and the constant feeling that I'm "bothering" people takes its toll. I can't seem to just shut it off.
(1) How do you think about call reluctance?

(2) How do you think about rejection? - by Jeff Blackwell
(1) How do you think about call reluctance?
I guess I'm having a hard time understanding the question. Maybe you could elaborate?

I think about call reluctance as an obstruction to having a productive day. Something I know is a hinderance to successful prospective, but psychologically, it's been difficult to overcome at times.

(2) How do you think about rejection?
Rejection is something that I have a thick skin for when it happens (it's rare that I get offended), but it also reinforces the idea that I may be an annoyance to busy folks and causes reluctance to get the day started.

Don't get me wrong - I feel like our products really help people and fulfill a need. - by Danomyte
I guess I'm having a hard time understanding the question. Maybe you could elaborate?
When you think about call reluctance and/or rejection you are mentally referencing "something" (e.g., event) in "someway" (e.g., observer vs. participant). What you think about and How you think about it directly impacts the reality you experience. With that in mind...

(1) How do you think about call reluctance?

(2) How do you think about rejection? - by Jeff Blackwell
When you think about call reluctance and/or rejection you are mentally referencing "something" (e.g., event) in "someway" (e.g., observer vs. participant). What you think about and How you think about it directly impacts the reality you experience. With that in mind...

(1) How do you think about call reluctance?

(2) How do you think about rejection?

Hi Jeff
Are you saying that it would be better to think about the event as an " observer " and not as a " participant." ?
By doing this our perception of call reluctance/ rejection would change and as a result how we " feel " about call reluctance/ rejection would change.
This could then be a very effective way to deal with call reluctance/ rejection.

Am I understanding your answer correctly ?

Positive Regards - by salesdog
Are you saying that it would be better to think about the event as an "observer" and not as a "participant"?
I am not suggesting that one way of re-presenting "something" in your mind is better than another. I am suggesting that there are different ways and that they affect the reality we experience.

For instance, it is possible that when an individual thinks of a "snake" he/she (1) recalls the memory of a small green rubber toy with poorly painted eyes that he/she played with as a child and re-experiences the feelings of enjoyment he/she felt from the good times with this toy while someone else (2) recalls the memory of searching for Garter snakes under cardboard boxes and plywood in vacant parcels and re-experiences the feelings of adventure he/she felt doing so while someone else (3) recalls the memory of crossing the path of a dangerous and coiled rattlesnake threatening to strike and re-experiences the feelings of fear he/she felt during this event.

In these examples "something" was being referenced in "someway" (e.g., visual, kinesthetic). As mentioned earlier, What you think about and How you think about it directly impacts the reality you experience. - by Jeff Blackwell
Jeff, you seem to have some ideas on this. My fear seems to be based on running out of leads or blowing a sales encounter.

Those seem to be my big hurdles. - by Outerspace
Jeff, you seem to have some ideas on this. My fear seems to be based on running out of leads or blowing a sales encounter.

Those seem to be my big hurdles.
Those fears come from focusing on results rather than activity. - by Gary A Boye
Jeff, you seem to have some ideas on this. My fear seems to be based on running out of leads or blowing a sales encounter.

Those seem to be my big hurdles.
I suspect that your emotion of fear comes from "imagining" yourself running out of leads or blowing a sales encounter and "imagining" the consequences of "it" happening.

If you do that then you will imagine yourself right into a State where you feel as-if "it" actually happened. "It" becomes your reality and the resulting State impacts your perception of available options and acceptable behaviors.

I suspect you are dwelling in the wrong direction (the what) in a way (the how) that leads you into less than resourceful states which in turn leads you to less productive behaviors. - by Jeff Blackwell
Some days I have trouble getting in the groove of making calls. It's not laziness, but call reluctance. Anyone have any strategies or motivational thoughts to overcome call reluctance?

Thanks!
Hi!

I supported my wife and 2 children from door-to-door cold-call sales for a 30 year period.

I can say, both Gary and Jeff are offering excellent advice.

I interpret Jeff as suggesting that your attitude about rejection is the issue. By focusing on negative results, you are engaged in a self-fulfilling prophesy.

Gary is saying that just by focusing on results alone, your attention is taken away from the essential sales activity.

Taken together, focusing on results can produce self-sabotage and layering that with a negative outlook you have a perfect recipe for creating rejection. - by John Voris
Some days I have trouble getting in the groove of making calls. It's not laziness, but call reluctance. Anyone have any strategies or motivational thoughts to overcome call reluctance?

Thanks!
Here is a trick I used for myself to avoid feelings of rejection and reduce anxiety.

Each morning I would say to myself:

"I am not going to sell anything. I don't care if I sell anything. All I want to do is meet people. I want to get to know them and their company. I will sell tomorrow but not today. Today, its all about having a good time and introducing my products to people." Of course "tomorrow" never came but the sales did.

Again, the only purpose of this was to shift my focus on the "activity" as Gary said, and avoid being aware of the results I was producing.

Ironically this worked for all 30 years of cold-calling. It is a different kind of negativity that generated very powerful and positive results.

I was not saying I can't sell, or no one wants to buy from me, or I don't want to enter that next door and bother others.

I acted as if I was only promoting the company. Nothing more.

If I could or could not sell didn't cross my mind. I didn't wonder if others wanted to buy from me because I was not selling! Why not go through that door, I'm just dropping off a brochure.

In fact, people would stop me and wonder what I was up to. "A salesman not selling?" Hey, what do you have? Let me see that list. Some saw my lack of trying to sell them pleasantly refreshing, impressing them as someone with unusually potent confidence.

This attitude of "not needing to sell," was so impressive, it appeared to them as if I represented a company that was so profitable, getting another sale--really didn't matter to them or me.

The sales staff members who did not last long, focused on the sale, worried about meeting the quota, and I was later told, appeared to BEG. Yes, with desperation in the agent's voice, naturally prospects took that as begging. That is a real turn-off.

Just a thought--I hope it helps. - by John Voris
Jeff, Gary and John are all giving you excellent advice.

The fact is it is you who is creating the feeling and you are doing it inside your head.

I want to offer another alternative probably closer to John's approach.

I want you to imagine how you want to feel when making the sales calls. What emotions do you want. (Notice I say emotions not just emotion) Then imagine a time in the past when you felt that emotion very strongly. Make sure the memory is vivid. What did you see, hear and feel at the time. Make sure you are in the experience. Then open your eyes, look at your phone and pick it up.

For example say you wanted to feel excited about making the calls. Think of a time when you were really excited. Maybe when you were about to get delivery of a new car or when you were young and eagerly anticipating the arrival of Santa on Christmas eve. Really relive the experience looking as it were through your own eyes. The open your eyes and pick u the phone.

You could do the same process with the emotions as fun or confidence etc.

This is working in a different way to what has been suggested. Instead of changing your thinking we are programming a new way of feeling about the experience.

Some will say that this is only a bandaid but trust me it works. I have used it with my clients on a number of occasions. - by Greg Woodley
Jeff, Gary and John are all giving you excellent advice.

The fact is it is you who is creating the feeling and you are doing it inside your head.

I want to offer another alternative probably closer to John's approach.

I want you to imagine how you want to feel when making the sales calls. What emotions do you want. (Notice I say emotions not just emotion) Then imagine a time in the past when you felt that emotion very strongly. Make sure the memory is vivid. What did you see, hear and feel at the time. Make sure you are in the experience. Then open your eyes, look at your phone and pick it up.

For example say you wanted to feel excited about making the calls. Think of a time when you were really excited. Maybe when you were about to get delivery of a new car or when you were young and eagerly anticipating the arrival of Santa on Christmas eve. Really relive the experience looking as it were through your own eyes. The open your eyes and pick u the phone.

You could do the same process with the emotions as fun or confidence etc.

This is working in a different way to what has been suggested. Instead of changing your thinking we are programming a new way of feeling about the experience.

Some will say that this is only a band-aid but trust me it works. I have used it with my clients on a number of occasions.
This is very good as well.

In our examples we are dealing with a variation of self-induced hypnosis.

For me, you are telling people to envision a positive emotional moment in the past and bring it forward as if it is present.

I am telling people to focus on promoting your product as if selling didn't matter.

Also, if either method is done enough, they move from a band-aid to being absorbed as a subconscious "way of being."

This is like driving a car with movements so repetitive we are able to build "body memory" to the point that we can day-dream while driving 65 miles an hour.

All of life is a "head-game." Why not shift the rules around as you go along?

Again, good advice. - by John Voris
I interpret Jeff as suggesting that your attitude about rejection is the issue. By focusing on negative results, you are engaged in a self-fulfilling prophesy.
Hi John. :)

I am suggesting that What ("something" real or imagined) we think about and How (re-presented "someway" in our minds) we think about "it" are components of our internal realities and directly influences our perceived options, actions and outcomes. - by Jeff Blackwell
Hi John. :)

I am suggesting that What ("something" real or imagined) we think about and How (re-presented "someway" in our minds) we think about "it" are components of our internal realities and directly influences our perceived options, actions and outcomes.

Hey Jeff,

Absolutely!

Attitudes generate "what we think", based on our beliefs of what is true. This directs "how we think" about those beleifs.

Yes, thinking reveals the components of our internal interpretation of reality, rendering actions and outcomes the effects of who we are and not the cause.

Unfortunately, much of your insight is ignored in Traditional Sales Training.

As been said before, sales is a mental human engagement.

There should be Sales training courses on this issue alone.

Advice from seasoned experience always contributes. - by John Voris
Those fears come from focusing on results rather than activity.
That is a really good way to express that sentiment. It's really been helping me. - by Outerspace
I suspect that your emotion of fear comes from "imagining" yourself running out of leads or blowing a sales encounter and "imagining" the consequences of "it" happening.

If you do that then you will imagine yourself right into a State where you feel as-if "it" actually happened. "It" becomes your reality and the resulting State impacts your perception of available options and acceptable behaviors.

I suspect you are dwelling in the wrong direction (the what) in a way (the how) that leads you into less than resourceful states which in turn leads you to less productive behaviors.
Jeff, thanks, both your comments and Gary's have made a big difference. - by Outerspace
Here is a trick I used for myself to avoid feelings of rejection and reduce anxiety.

This attitude of "not needing to sell," was so impressive, it appeared to them as if I represented a company that was so profitable, getting another sale--really didn't matter to them or me.

The sales staff members who did not last long, focused on the sale, worried about meeting the quota, and I was later told, appeared to BEG. Yes, with desperation in the agent's voice, naturally prospects took that as begging. That is a real turn-off.

Just a thought--I hope it helps.

I think I found something I needed but was not aware of. I think this will make a big difference for me. Thank YOU. - by SEOmarketing
Everyone has those days guy. I retired last year from Xerox after 28 years and can promise you... everyone has days where they just can't seem to find their rythum. It's natural. Hang in there and remember;...on a cold call (or warm call)...ALWAYS leave something behind besides simply your business card. ALWAYS leave a "brochure"...even if they tell you they just bought a new unit yesterday!! You never know where that brochure will end up. Always make sure the brochure has your name and number on it. NEVER LEAVE SOMEONE'S OFFICE WITHOUT LEAVING BEHIND A BROCHURE! If your company complains about the "cost" of brochures... YOU'RE WORKING FOR THE WRONG ORGANIZATION! Best of luck to you!! - by Kenny12554
I would have to agree that maybe it is rejection that is leading to your call reluctance. To boost your cold calling methods, you need to think out a creative but compelling message first. As you said that it is your form of living, you need to just do it! No room for reluctance if you really want to make sales. - by josegordon123
You might to really do some serious "soul searching" and try and hone in on exactly "where" this reluctance is coming from? Cold calls are what you make them. If the reluctance continues over a prolonged period of time, perhaps sales is NOT your cup of tea. But if it is just a "now and then" thing...that sounds pretty typical. Again, you HAVE to decide and understand what it is that makes YOUR product or service superior to your competition...and then make that a part of your presentation. Remember too... your "competitors" have the SAME reluctance occasionally.

Good luck!! - by Kenny12554
Everyone has those days guy. I retired last year from Xerox after 28 years and can promise you... everyone has days where they just can't seem to find their rythum. It's natural. Hang in there and remember;...on a cold call (or warm call)...ALWAYS leave something behind besides simply your business card. ALWAYS leave a "brochure"...even if they tell you they just bought a new unit yesterday!! You never know where that brochure will end up. Always make sure the brochure has your name and number on it. NEVER LEAVE SOMEONE'S OFFICE WITHOUT LEAVING BEHIND A BROCHURE! If your company complains about the "cost" of brochures... YOU'RE WORKING FOR THE WRONG ORGANIZATION! Best of luck to you!!
This is very true. Regardless of who you are or where you sell or what you sell, or how long you have been selling, we are always on a roller-coaster ride of selling.

No one can sell anything to everyone all the time.


- by John Voris
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