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Manufactured Consent

Walter Lippmann who was on President Woodrow Wilson's Committee on Public Information (Public Relations) once said,

"If the public escapes its marginalization and passivity, we face a 'crisis of democracy' that must be overcome...and to prevent this catastrophe, we must manufacture their consent."

That is, have the government trigger the present belief systems of the masses through the media in such a way as to mold and secure public consent.
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Would you say that rather than manipulating, coercing or pressuring your prospect to buy, you are listening for bits of information so you can manufacture their consent?

- by John Voris
Walter Lippmann who was on President Woodrow Wilson's Committee on Public Information (Public Relations) once said,

"If the public escapes its marginalization and passivity, we face a 'crisis of democracy' that must be overcome...and to prevent this catastrophe, we must manufacture their consent."

That is, have the government trigger the present belief systems of the masses through the media in such a way as to mold and secure public consent.
__________________________________________________

Would you say that rather than manipulating, coercing or pressuring your prospect to buy, you are listening for bits of information so you can manufacture their consent?

I would say that it does not fall in the realm of personal selling as we discuss it here.

It could happen between two people. Marriage relationships offer many examples. But as a function of selling, it would warrant little focus if any. - by Gary A Boye
I would say that it does not fall in the realm of personal selling as we discuss it here.

It could happen between two people. Marriage relationships offer many examples. But as a function of selling, it would warrant little focus if any.
Hey Gary,

I need just a tad more explanation.

;bg - by John Voris
Hey Gary,

I need just a tad more explanation.

;bg
Sure.

The example you gave in explanation of manufactured consent, a term that rarely would find its way into discussions on selling, is far removed from what salespeople do for a living.

But let's look at your question:

Would you say that rather than manipulating, coercing or pressuring your prospect to buy, you are listening for bits of information so you can manufacture their consent?
You phrased the question, i.e. "rather than", in an either/or form. If not this--then that. It left out "neither."

Many people, especially the successful ones, don't manipulate, coerce, or pressure their prospects en route to a sale. Neither do they manufacture consent.

Consent comes from the buyer. What we call "closing" is facilitating a progression of consent. - by Gary A Boye
Sure.

The example you gave in explanation of manufactured consent, a term that rarely would find its way into discussions on selling, is far removed from what salespeople do for a living.

But let's look at your question:

You phrased the question, i.e. "rather than", in an either/or form. If not this--then that. It left out "neither."

Many people, especially the successful ones, don't manipulate, coerce, or pressure their prospects en route to a sale. Neither do they manufacture consent.

Consent comes from the buyer. What we call "closing" is facilitating a progression of consent.
Thanks.

Now, could "closing" share qualities of "manufacturing?"

Also, by "manufacture" I don't mean to "make up" out of thin air. Rather, to gather true feelings and real information from the prospect, and arrange them in a way that generates consent.

Could this rendition of "manufacture" be closer to fitting with the "close" process? - by John Voris
Could this rendition of "manufacture" be closer to fitting with the "close" process?
John, let me illustrate my thoughts on this by drawing a word picture.

If you and I were sitting in a local Starbucks nursing lattes, and you introduced the topic of Manufactured Consent, my own participation in the topic might include McCarthyism, Dr Phil, the reported health benefits of dark chocolate, World War ll, what may or may not have taken place at the Gulf of Tonkin, or Donald Trump's passion for his new found hobby of vital statistics.

I doubt I would have attached the term to sales or sales education in spite of the fact that those are the fields I work in. - by Gary A Boye
John, let me illustrate my thoughts on this by drawing a word picture.

If you and I were sitting in a local Starbucks nursing lattes, and you introduced the topic of Manufactured Consent, my own participation in the topic might include McCarthyism, Dr Phil, the reported health benefits of dark chocolate, World War ll, what may or may not have taken place at the Gulf of Tonkin, or Donald Trump's passion for his new found hobby of vital statistics.

I doubt I would have attached the term to sales or sales education in spite of the fact that those are the fields I work in.
First, I agree. However, this is another example of language getting in the way of communication.

In some circles, McCarthyism etc., would also be considered a "sales job" on the public.

However, IMO we are only a "sentence" apart in the big book of Agreement.

You said,

"Consent comes from the buyer. What we call "closing" is facilitating a progression of consent.

Strictly speaking," closing" and "manufacturing" are conceptually different terms. However, I was trying to draw a comparison between "manufacturing" in the same tone and flavor as "facilitating a progression of consent."

In this context, I was using "manufacturing" in the sense of building a computer or making house paint. That is, taking what is present and through transformation, a final product is generated. For Lippmann it was the "will of the people." For us the sale is the final outcome.

Instead of using "manufacture consent" other phrases may be more appropriate such as: generate consent, build consent, enable consent etc.

This was prompted because many new to sales cannot shake the idea that they are manipulating the prospect. If they see the process in a different light, they may not be so hard on themselves. - by John Voris
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