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Best way to get a Sales Job?

In my last interview for a sales position, I was encouraged to start off by asking the questions instead of just giving answers. The best approach would have been to have asked what the current needs of the company were and what it was about my resume that attracted their attention. After that I would go on and explain my fit or otherwise. I was told its called consultative selling.

Are there any other pointers anyone else might have in mind to land a sales position? - by jramz
In my last interview for a sales position, I was encouraged to start off by asking the questions instead of just giving answers. The best approach would have been to have asked what the current needs of the company were and what it was about my resume that attracted their attention. After that I would go on and explain my fit or otherwise. I was told its called consultative selling.

Are there any other pointers anyone else might have in mind to land a sales position?
Years ago I was a financial recruiter in San Fransisco and placed accountants in and out of Big 8 CPA firms and private industry.

By the time the hiring manager has reviewed your resume and called you in for an interview--you have met the minimum requirements.

Asking for the current company needs, tells the interviewer that their company is not just another job opportunity.--you really want to work there.

Asking, what about the resume that attracted their attention is like asking--what do you like about me. This shows insecurity. You should know.

For every person you ask about interviewing you will get anther answer and it will drive you crazy. There is no rigid set formula because each interviewer has their biases.

The interview is about you the person. What is your temperament, confidence level, assertiveness, curiosity level etc? Most importantly, would the interviewer like going out for coffee with you. Can you be fun and serious?

The only formula there is says, "just be yourself." Don't approach the interviewer with a pre-set formula. If you sell them an artificial version of yourself and your hired, that may show up in the future and cost you.

I hope this helps. - by John Voris
I would make the general suggestion to answer questions with specific examples of how you demonstrated the behavior or skill you are being asked about.

This, rather than providing general or theoretical responses, will show the interviewer that you have the specific skills they are looking for. With theoretical responses you are only demonstrating that you know what answer they are looking for, not that you can, and have done, what they are looking for.

A good interviewer should be asking questions about past behaviors, however it is my experience that most interviews are not conducted in this way. Where that is the case, take your responses in the direction of demonstrable and recent actions and you will find a greater resonance with the interviewer.

And of course, relax, try to have fun, dress well, and ask for the job. Often asking for the job where others haven't is enough to distinguish yourself as someone who is capable of asking for the sale.

Finally, what type of sales job are you looking for and where are you located. Perhaps I can help. - by thesalesgiant
I agree with everything John has mentioned above.

One thing I would like to add is over my time I have noticed that many people will talk about why they believe they should be chosen for a role without asking an important questions - what is important to the business?

A great sales person has a conversation rather then a presentation.

Whenever I apply for a role (which isn't very often) I will take a moment to ask "when recruiting for ______ position, what is important to you?"

From there I am able to gauge what is important to the business and then I can recommend the benefits of me to the specific role requirements that I've just been told. - by MrCharisma
I agree with everything John has mentioned above.

One thing I would like to add is over my time I have noticed that many people will talk about why they believe they should be chosen for a role without asking an important questions - what is important to the business?

A great sales person has a conversation rather then a presentation.

Whenever I apply for a role (which isn't very often) I will take a moment to ask "when recruiting for ______ position, what is important to you?"

From there I am able to gauge what is important to the business and then I can recommend the benefits of me to the specific role requirements that I've just been told.
I agree with your points on this, but I don't agree with the following: "A great sales person has a conversation rather then a presentation."

Mastering the components of presentation is an area which the majority of salespeople fall short on. I believe in the term "sales conversation" but the ability to present ideas, products, features, benefits, solutions is never an ability that a salesperson should bypass developing, regardless of how skilled they are in conversation.

You have to have a grasp on the static elements in sales to excel in the dynamic areas. - by Gary A Boye
I agree with