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Is Know-Like and Trust Essential?

Recently, marketing gurus are saying that the prospect must know, like and trust you before they buy. This is why you must get these messages across in all your marking material.

Can a website enable others to know you?

Can a website compel prospects to like and trust you?

What do you think? What has been your experience? - by John Voris
Recently, marketing gurus are saying that the prospect must know, like and trust you before they buy. This is why you must get these messages across in all your marking material.

Can a website enable others to know you?

Can a website compel prospects to like and trust you?

What do you think? What has been your experience?
Well, there's four questions--all good ones, but there is one vital question left out. It's this: Are the marketing gurus correct in saying that a prospect must know, like, and trust you before they buy? (In other words, are we working with a viable premise?)

The pure answer to that question is No.

However (and this is a BIG however.), the know, like, and trust model is still a workable model for salespeople if they choose. Author Bob Burg champions that model, and Burg is an intelligent contributor to sales education.

With that out of the way, I'll offer my thoughts to the topic's questions.

A web site can provide information about you, but "know you" is a stretch. It can provide a perception, but perception is not knowledge.

Can a web site compel prospects to like and trust you? Well, the word "compel" looks awful awkward here. So, I'll go thumbs down. Possibly influence works better, but here's the rub. I believe there would have to be some predisposition on the part of the visitor to achieve that. So let's say that a predisposition to like and trust you could be reinforced by the content in the site.

Back in 1995, I addressed a group of business owners on a newfangled thing called the Internet. I was one page ahead of the class. (Don't knock it--not a bad place to be.) I pulled a profound statement out of my sleeve--I was on a roll that night. I said that in order to fully benefit from the World Wide Web, you have to know both its impact AND its limitations.

If I were addressing a group today, I would feel comfortable in saying the very same thing--sixteen years later. - by Gary A Boye

The pure answer to that question is No.
Thanks Gary!

For me your key word is "predisposition." It shows up everywhere in daily life. Philosophers and scientists agree that a predisposition is always present before action, even when the person is unaware of its presence.

So let's say that a predisposition to like and trust you could be reinforced by the content in the site.

Logically there are also predispositions not to like and trust that can be reinforced.
I agree there are many limitations, the Internet can offer information but has difficulty with "knowledge." I believe the Internet can talk about knowledge but true knowledge must be formed in the mind of the reader as it interweaves with his or her experiences.

I say that because there are those who are projecting the demise of the professional sales rep due to the Internet. - by John Voris
.....there are those who are projecting the demise of the professional sales rep due to the Internet.
I'm not an aficionado of NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming), but I credit fellows like Richard Bandler and Michael Hall for teaching me a new word: Nominalization. It refers to the increasingly common practice of converting a verb to a noun and the result is that we give birth to an entity whether it really exists or not.

Those who teach writing often say "Writers write." I like to say sellers (salespeople, salesmen, saleswomen, sales professionals) sell.

The demise of the "professional sales rep(resentative) will always come on an individual basis--one by one- as a person stops selling and/or stops representing. Note the active verbs in use here.

Blame the internet, blame call reluctance, change of career, laziness, inability to shift gears or find drier tinder, or, for that matter, The Grim Reaper.

Things change and always will, That doesn't necessarily mean that change comes accompanied by a pair of handcuffs. - by Gary A Boye
Recently, marketing gurus are saying that the prospect must know, like and trust you before they buy. This is why you must get these messages across in all your marking material.

Can a website enable others to know you?
Our company website has a video that allows the person to watch it and see if they would like the kind of service we provide. Many people who call after visiting our web site comment on that aspect of our web page. In this case they know what to expect from us.