Home > Social Influence > Is Know-Like and Trust Essential?

Is Know-Like and Trust Essential?

Recently, marketing gurus are saying that the prospect must know, like and trust you before they buy. This is why you must get these messages across in all your marking material.

Can a website enable others to know you?

Can a website compel prospects to like and trust you?

What do you think? What has been your experience? - by John Voris
Recently, marketing gurus are saying that the prospect must know, like and trust you before they buy. This is why you must get these messages across in all your marking material.

Can a website enable others to know you?

Can a website compel prospects to like and trust you?

What do you think? What has been your experience?
Well, there's four questions--all good ones, but there is one vital question left out. It's this: Are the marketing gurus correct in saying that a prospect must know, like, and trust you before they buy? (In other words, are we working with a viable premise?)

The pure answer to that question is No.

However (and this is a BIG however.), the know, like, and trust model is still a workable model for salespeople if they choose. Author Bob Burg champions that model, and Burg is an intelligent contributor to sales education.

With that out of the way, I'll offer my thoughts to the topic's questions.

A web site can provide information about you, but "know you" is a stretch. It can provide a perception, but perception is not knowledge.

Can a web site compel prospects to like and trust you? Well, the word "compel" looks awful awkward here. So, I'll go thumbs down. Possibly influence works better, but here's the rub. I believe there would have to be some predisposition on the part of the visitor to achieve that. So let's say that a predisposition to like and trust you could be reinforced by the content in the site.

Back in 1995, I addressed a group of business owners on a newfangled thing called the Internet. I was one page ahead of the class. (Don't knock it--not a bad place to be.) I pulled a profound statement out of my sleeve--I was on a roll that night. I said that in order to fully benefit from the World Wide Web, you have to know both its impact AND its limitations.

If I were addressing a group today, I would feel comfortable in saying the very same thing--sixteen years later. - by Gary A Boye

The pure answer to that question is No.
Thanks Gary!

For me your key word is "predisposition." It shows up everywhere in daily life. Philosophers and scientists agree that a predisposition is always present before action, even when the person is unaware of its presence.

So let's say that a predisposition to like and trust you could be reinforced by the content in the site.

Logically there are also predispositions not to like and trust that can be reinforced.
I agree there are many limitations, the Internet can offer information but has difficulty with "knowledge." I believe the Internet can talk about knowledge but true knowledge must be formed in the mind of the reader as it interweaves with his or her experiences.

I say that because there are those who are projecting the demise of the professional sales rep due to the Internet. - by John Voris
.....there are those who are projecting the demise of the professional sales rep due to the Internet.
I'm not an aficionado of NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming), but I credit fellows like Richard Bandler and Michael Hall for teaching me a new word: Nominalization. It refers to the increasingly common practice of converting a verb to a noun and the result is that we give birth to an entity whether it really exists or not.

Those who teach writing often say "Writers write." I like to say sellers (salespeople, salesmen, saleswomen, sales professionals) sell.

The demise of the "professional sales rep(resentative) will always come on an individual basis--one by one- as a person stops selling and/or stops representing. Note the active verbs in use here.

Blame the internet, blame call reluctance, change of career, laziness, inability to shift gears or find drier tinder, or, for that matter, The Grim Reaper.

Things change and always will, That doesn't necessarily mean that change comes accompanied by a pair of handcuffs. - by Gary A Boye
Recently, marketing gurus are saying that the prospect must know, like and trust you before they buy. This is why you must get these messages across in all your marking material.

Can a website enable others to know you?
Our company website has a video that allows the person to watch it and see if they would like the kind of service we provide. Many people who call after visiting our web site comment on that aspect of our web page. In this case they know what to expect from us.

Can a website compel prospects to like and trust you?

I am not sure that it compels the customer to like us however it sets the stage for us to champion that cause when we do what the person expects us to do. The "like" in this case is liking our policy and performance prior to us actually showing what we do.

When we do perform what they have seen and then go over the expectation the trust and like aspect is strengthen. It informs the person we practice what we preach.

The internet web site by itself does not compel the customer to trust and like us however it does inform him or her; what to expect from us and when we deliver on those promises it helps.

When the tech does not perform to the web sites instruction trust and like disappears.
- by rich34232
Our company website has a video that allows the person to watch it and see if they would like the kind of service we provide. Many people who call after visiting our web site comment on that aspect of our web page. In this case they know what to expect from us.

I am not sure that it compels the customer to like us however it sets the stage for us to champion that cause when we do what the person expects us to do. The "like" in this case is liking our policy and performance prior to us actually showing what we do.

When we do perform what they have seen and then go over the expectation the trust and like aspect is strengthen. It informs the person we practice what we preach.
The internet web site by itself does not compel the customer to trust and like us however it does inform him or her; what to expect from us and when we deliver on those promises it helps.

This is most important for me. A website alone can only inform.

When the tech does not perform to the web sites instruction trust and like disappears.
IMO you make excellent distinctions.

The liking for the Service and Policy are processes that can only make an indirect comment on those people performing those processes.


However, when you physically execute in person, customers have a real experience with people, and "know, like and trust" moves from an ideology to understanding.

It seems reasonable to conclude that with the web generating information only, "know, like and trust" can only be applied to the web image resulting from brand building. - by John Voris
I, like Gary, do not think that K,L & T is essential but it sure has helped me a lot over the years.

I think it's possible to generate this over the web but it's not easy. I have struggled to do it myself for the very reasons you mention John. I have no trouble demonstrating that face-to-face because I can respond to the person in front of me and my expertise and intent comes out.

But I know others have created K,L & T on the Net. There are some people killing it on-line and I know they have big, avid, almost cult like tribes who love and follow them. Some of these personas that people relate to would be fake, I'm sure, but I know of a few that are absolutely genuine having met these people in person. - by Greg Woodley
I agree that developing a web persona is absolutely necessary. This persona can be used across the web--social media, on your own site, etc.

Unless there's a personal touch of some sort, people aren't going to trust you right off the bat. - by salesandsales
Well, there's four questions--all good ones, but there is one vital question left out. It's this: Are the marketing gurus correct in saying that a prospect must know, like, and trust you before they buy? (In other words, are we working with a viable premise?)

The pure answer to that question is No.

However (and this is a BIG however.), the know, like, and trust model is still a workable model for salespeople if they choose. Author Bob Burg champions that model, and Burg is an intelligent contributor to sales education.

With that out of the way, I'll offer my thoughts to the topic's questions.

Can a web site compel prospects to like and trust you? Well, the word "compel" looks awful awkward here. So, I'll go thumbs down. Possibly influence works better, but here's the rub. I believe there would have to be some predisposition on the part of the visitor to achieve that. So let's say that a predisposition to like and trust you could be reinforced by the content in the site.

I said that in order to fully benefit from the World Wide Web, you have to know both its impact AND its limitations.
Hey Gary,

You went straight to the issue: "Are the marketing gurus correct in saying that a prospect must know, like, and trust you before they buy?" They are saying this is essential!

That was ultimately my point and I agree with your answer--NO!

If the premise is false every point that follows is questionable.

Yet, from this false premise, books are being written and trainees are again focusing on distracting issues obstructing their real goals.

I purposely used the word "compel," to illicit a negative response. (Thanks) I believe the web is a tool among the rest with each contributing to the flow of decision making--that's it.

I also agree that the web is basically a mode of information and "know" is definitely a stretch.

I have bought from people I did not Know
I have bought from people I did not Like

I have also bought from people I did not trust rather, I trusted the system they represented and relied on my potential remedies.

Gurus are pushing the Know-Like-trust scenario with courses, workshops and other training material. - by John Voris
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