Home > Closing > No objection, no sale.

No objection, no sale.

So, I'm running into this type of customer a lot. They agree to everything, but don't buy. They never really voice an actual objection that can be overcome. "Price is good. Payments are fine. Down payment is great. Etc." Yet they don't buy. Their heads shake up and down like a bobblehead doll, but I can't close them. Am I doing something wrong, or were these people destined to not be closed all along? Are they tire-kickers and I'm not qualifying properly? How do I solve this problem in my sales? - by wesbound
Chances are that many of those prospects DO want to buy the car but they just don't want to buy from YOU.

Why do I say that?

Well--two things come to mind. The first is a fundamental of selling. People PREFER to buy from people they like.

The other thing that comes to mind is that I've read your posts for going on three years--like I read everyone's posts. One thing that stands out is the apparent DISLIKE you have for "buyers." You have parroted on more than one thread that you believe "buyers are LIARS." Not a very nice thing to say about anyone. You refer to some as "tire kickers" and make demeaning metaphors about bobbing heads. You mentioned here on another thread that you are quick to challenge buyers' bull****.

Well, the bottom line is as old as human nature itself. There is a tendency among people (buyers are people, btw) to LIKE other people who like us. Buyers pick up on how you feel about them.

The end results, which have parlayed your career into too many No Sales to achieve whatever goals you have, is that prospects will take information from someone they don't like (call it unpaid consulting), and go buy from someone they do like.

Don't think for a minute that they are not buying cars.

Hope that helps. - by Gary A Boye
Ouch. It is true buyers buy from people they like. You've got to be likable. The best way to do this is to be relaxed, helpful, cheerful, knowledgeable, and by being this way, the customer will want to help you in return. They came to you to buy something, help them do that. - by mercV12
Chances are that many of those prospects DO want to buy the car but they just don't want to buy from YOU.

Why do I say that?

Well--two things come to mind. The first is a fundamental of selling. People PREFER to buy from people they like.

The other thing that comes to mind is that I've read your posts for going on three years--like I read everyone's posts. One thing that stands out is the apparent DISLIKE you have for "buyers." You have parroted on more than one thread that you believe "buyers are LIARS." Not a very nice thing to say about anyone. You refer to some as "tire kickers" and make demeaning metaphors about bobbing heads. You mentioned here on another thread that you are quick to challenge buyers' bull****.

Well, the bottom line is as old as human nature itself. There is a tendency among people (buyers are people, btw) to LIKE other people who like us. Buyers pick up on how you feel about them.

The end results, which have parlayed your career into too many No Sales to achieve whatever goals you have, is that prospects will take information from someone they don't like (call it unpaid consulting), and go buy from someone they do like.

Don't think for a minute that they are not buying cars.

Hope that helps.
Let me ask you a question...how many automobiles have you sold in your life? I'm guessing what you are doing in your above-mentioned post is what is known in psychology as projection. Let's get one thing straight, I am doing my best to improve. If you don't want to help, don't. I am asking a legitimate question. The exact customer I am describing is called "Aggreable Al" by Zig Ziglar in his book on closing. Would you rather I use that term instead of "bobblehead?" It makes no difference to me, but if you honestly think that there aren't tire-kickers and buyers don't lie to salesman in the car business, you are mistaken. Care to take a stab at answering my question now? - by wesbound
Let me ask you a question...how many automobiles have you sold in your life? I'm guessing what you are doing in your above-mentioned post is what is known in psychology as projection. Let's get one thing straight, I am doing my best to improve. If you don't want to help, don't. I am asking a legitimate question. The exact customer I am describing is called "Aggreable Al" by Zig Ziglar in his book on closing. Would you rather I use that term instead of "bobblehead?" It makes no difference to me, but if you honestly think that there aren't tire-kickers and buyers don't lie to salesman in the car business, you are mistaken. Care to take a stab at answering my question now?
It will be fun to address your queries and statements one at a time.

I spent only 19 months in the auto business prior to entering one of my own businesses. Within six months, I was the top volume salesman in a dealership with over forty salespeople including new, used, and trucks. (Fleet was a separate department.) I was assigned the position of F and I manager and during that portion of my stay at that dealership, I increased back end profit dollars by a little over 200%.

My major in college was psychology and I can tell you I don't fit the "projection" mold. However, I have seen many people fail miserably demonstrating traits that I addressed on this thread.

With regard to your improvement journey, as moderator here I am aware that you are asking the exact same questions you were asking in 2009 and describing buyers the same way at that time too. Does that tell you something?

I don't question the legitimacy of your question. I object to your premise about buyers, and I stated a few days ago that demeaning statements about the buying public ARE NOT WELCOME HERE.

Zig Ziglar was a retail cookware salesman before he became an author. I have no knowledge that he ever tried to sell cars.

Finally, I am less inclined to help you than I am to share knowledge about what works and what doesn't work in selling, pursuant to SP's mission of being a highly informative site.

On the other hand, if these messages serve as a wake up call to even one of the wesbounds of the world who continue to struggle while they resist looking inward for the cause of their frustrations, it would serve as an inch forward for SPs intent to provide sales education.

Unfortunately, your own lack of success which you share got caught in the crossfires. It happens. You're one of many. Hopefully you'll find your way out of it.

Here's to the members that DO succeed and enjoy our profession--and to those who share their victories here. - by Gary A Boye
Excellent response Gary.

People must like you in order to buy from you and the only way for them to like you is if you sincerely like them.

Selling is about finding ways to help people solve their problems and fulfill their needs. I don't know of anyway to be even remotely interested in doing this if you don't like the people you are selling to.

There is something fundamentally wrong about a selling approach that tries to do something to a prospect rather than for a prospect. For one who tries to do the former there is no situational advice that can help because all the difficulties they have in selling are symptoms of their failure to approach selling from the perspective of the later.

Regards - by thesalesgiant
I disagree.

We analyzed studies on Buying Decision Factors by 9 universities, market researchers, and trade associations.

The two most important buying decision factors are:
1. Trust in the salesperson and/or their company.
2. Respect for the salesperson.
One of those two factors occurred at the top by over 90% of the respondents.

Whether the respondents like the salesperson ranked at number 12 and is a top factor for less than 4% of the respondents. - by JacquesWerth
I disagree.

We analyzed studies on Buying Decision Factors by 9 universities, market researchers, and trade associations.

The two most important buying decision factors are:
1. Trust in the salesperson and/or their company.
2. Respect for the salesperson.
One of those two factors occurred at the top by over 90% of the respondents.

Whether the respondents like the salesperson ranked at number 12 and is a top factor for less than 4% of the respondents.
Perhaps the statement you are disagreeing with is mine where I said that people prefer to buy from people they like.

Did the analyzed studies address preference? - by Gary A Boye
The studies I referred to were statistical rather than specific. So, it's safe to assume that, in the unlikely event that all other factors were the same, people would rather buy from the salesperson they like. - by JacquesWerth
I revisited this thread and realized that there are at least two conversations going on.

I don't think people will readily buy from someone they DISLIKE which, to me, is the polar opposite of LIKE.

NOT LIKING a person does not mean DISLIKING a person. It could be neutral, where certainly the important factors of TRUST and RESPECT are more easily magnified. - by Gary A Boye
i think they go hand in hand.. you dont like someone you dont trust especially in a sales situation..you buy from who you like because you trust them. - by libbycop
i think they go hand in hand.. you dont like someone you dont trust especially in a sales situation..you buy from who you like because you trust them.
I can think of people I like who I don't trust.
I have bought from people I don't like.
I doubt I would buy from something I dislike. - by Gary A Boye
Let me ask you a question...how many automobiles have you sold in your life? I'm guessing what you are doing in your above-mentioned post is what is known in psychology as projection. Let's get one thing straight, I am doing my best to improve. If you don't want to help, don't. I am asking a legitimate question. The exact customer I am describing is called "Aggreable Al" by Zig Ziglar in his book on closing. Would you rather I use that term instead of "bobblehead?" It makes no difference to me, but if you honestly think that there aren't tire-kickers and buyers don't lie to salesman in the car business, you are mistaken. Care to take a stab at answering my question now?
I know the above response was addressed to Gary, but I'll take the liberty to respond to it, also.

Many years ago, without any background in the car industry, I bought an 80% interest in a small car agency that was insolvent. My investment was used for operating expenses while we turned the company around. We increased sales by 160 percent in the first year and our net profits were in the top 25% of NADA averages.

The key to the turnaround was that we did not use any of the typical sales tactics of car dealers. We had a one price policy with no haggling. The commission scale was level. We spent very little time with prospects who were price shoppers or tire kickers.

We treated each other, and all prospects, with trust and respect. Over 50% of our employees did not comply and were fired. Prospects who did not reciprocate were politely encouraged to visit our competitors. Profit margins in all departments were higher than average.

Unfortunately, the sales practices of car industry have not evolved. - by JacquesWerth
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