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How do we get the truth from customers?

In my opinion:

Always leave customers a way out of the situation before they buy, if they feel too much pressure and feel as if they are in a hostage situation then youíll never get the truth from them, so always leave them a way out.

I know this sounds counter intuitive (we were always trained to persuade a little better or be a bit more savvy), I think the opposite is true. When you open up your hands and mind then things can flow in and out more easily. In my experience creating a free and open kind of environment where Iím there, genuinely with their needs as a priority and not mine, then my chances of getting the truth are greatly improved because they can feel its all about them and not about me making my numbers for the month.

If you donít get the truth then youíre unlikely to get the sale unless itís based on price and thatís not really where most of us want to be.

Any comments? - by Tony Dunne
I'm aligned with you on this.

I'll add:

Intrinsic honest questions are the building blocks of sales. When we ask honest questions, we reserve the right to receive honest answers.

Conversely, when we ask manipulative questions in the variety of types that are, unfortunately, too often taught, we forfeit the right to get the real truth from our prospects.

Honest, straightforward conversation often takes courage. The payoff is worth it. - by Gary A Boye
In my opinion:

Always leave customers a way out of the situation before they buy, if they feel too much pressure and feel as if they are in a hostage situation then youíll never get the truth from them, so always leave them a way out.

When you open up your hands and mind then things can flow in and out more easily. In my experience creating a free and open kind of environment where Iím there, genuinely with their needs as a priority and not mine, then my chances of getting the truth are greatly improved because they can feel its all about them and not about me making my numbers for the month.
Any comments?
Great insight that trainers often forget or purposely avoid in their zeal to reveal their "secrets" of selling. - by John Voris

Honest, straightforward conversation often takes courage. The payoff is worth it.
Gary,

You continue to amaze me.

This statement is actually far more revealing than a cursory inspection can discover.

Why does an honest straightforward conversation often take courage?

I believe that speaking from an artificial place creates a protective barrier that preventing the intrinsic from communicating between two people.

Honesty, lifts such impediments but also exposes the underbelly of our sense of identity leaving us feeling vulnerable. Others begin to "see" what we normally hide and at times this exposure calls for bravery.

The payoff is found in the natural mutual trust that vulnerability generates.

This tension may also be one reason why trainees may lean more toward emulating their trainers far too long, avoiding this sense of vulnerability. - by John Voris
You get the truth from people when people trust you and respect you. Trust and respect are not calculated decisions. Trust and respect are intuitive responses that people feel.

I observed hundreds of the best salespeople (the top 1%) on three continents. About 85% asked deep emotional questions to determine the level of trust and respect they would have with their prospects.

I suggest that the people we train read "Power vs. Force" by Dr. David Hawkins, a research psychiatrist who is a leading authority on intuition. - by JacquesWerth
You get the truth from people when people trust you and respect you. Trust and respect are not calculated decisions. Trust and respect are intuitive responses that people feel.

I observed hundreds of the best salespeople (the top 1%) on three continents. About 85% asked deep emotional questions to determine the level of trust and respect they would have with their prospects.

I suggest that the people we train read "Power vs. Force" by Dr. David Hawkins, a research psychiatrist who is a leading authority on intuition.

Yes, "Power vs. Force" is highly instructive especially for trainees. However, too often new recruits read similar material then are "brow-beaten" into using far more aggressive and highly manipulative techniques by the management.

What can we do about this?

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. - by John Voris
Yes, "Power vs. Force" is highly instructive especially for trainees. However, too often new recruits read similar material then are "brow-beaten" into using far more aggressive and highly manipulative techniques by the management.

What can we do about this?

Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
John's issue about how salespeople "... are "brow-beaten" into using far more aggressive and highly manipulative techniques by management" is a very important consideration.

I once had a conversation about sales with the Senior VP, Sales and Marketing, for one of the ten largest banks in America. His opinion was that sales is a sleazy activity that requires half-truths and convincing manipulation. Therefore, his bank sought to hire those kinds of salespeople.

Here's another example.
We trained one commercial lending officer who worked for a major bank. His revenues for the next year were more that 3 times greater than any of the other loan